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3

-O not -o. That is, upper case not lower case. Anyway, you can just leave it out altogether. Default is -O0. In case it's not clear, -o has a different meaning. It determines the compilation output name. So you should keep that in your command line. Add -O to change the optimisation level (or leave it out for default). So in fact, your original build ...


0

To complement the other answers, here is a do-it-yourself, what-is-gcc-doing example. Let us write a simple testcase: int f(int i){ return __builtin_popcount(i); } and compile it with gcc -c test.c -fdump-tree-all. This creates several files, starting with test.c.003t.original: ;; Function f (null) ;; enabled by -tree-original { return ...


0

This seems to have changed in gcc-5. With gcc-4.9.2, gcc -march=native -Ofast -Q --help=params starts with: predictable-branch-outcome Maximal estimated outcome of branch considered predictable while with gcc-5.1.0, I see: predictable-branch-outcome default 2 minimum 0 maximum 50 The change appears to be from this commit.


0

Why not you just try to write a shell script(such as this) and build with it:) #!/bin/bash make ./random > input ./toy < input gprof toy > toy_report gprof random > random_report don't forget $chmod +x YOUR_SCRIPT_NAME.sh and "shell_cmd" : "./YOUR_SCRIPT_NAME.sh"


0

The code is skipping white spaces. Try: myfile >> noskipws; while(myfile >> x) g << x;


1

__builtin_popcount is a gcc-specific extension. It acts like a function with the declaration: int __builtin_popcount (unsigned int x); If you had an actual function with that declaration, and its declaration were visible, then you could pass an argument of any numeric type to it. Since the declaration is a prototype, any argument you pass would be ...


0

The problem is that the code you're trying to compile assuming that any target CPU that's not a PowerPC must be an x86 processor. The code simply doesn't doesn't support the SPARC CPU. Fortunately the code doesn't seem to be critical, it's apparently only used to seed a random number generator, which is then used to create random C programs. I'd replace the ...


0

Tanks, I have resolv the problem change Makefile.ini after read this page: https://www.mail-archive.com/debian-bugs-dist@lists.debian.org/msg1278320.html


0

You can set the CC environment variable to specify the C compiler, and CXX to specify the C++ compiler.


1

Yes. You can pass signed int as well — assuming negative number is represented as 2's complement (which is most on the modern systems). If the number is positive, then it is as good as unsigned int. If you pass a negative number however, say -1, it will convert into a very large number of type unsigned int, but it will not change the bits-pattern ...


0

Looks like the GCC 5.1 release added exactly the warning I was looking for: -Wsuggest-override        Warn about overriding virtual functions that are not marked with the override keyword. Compiling with -Wsuggest-override -Werror=suggest-override would then enforce that all overrides use override.


0

The simplest, in my opinion, would be to do a make clean and then a make. This is of course assuming that you want all source files to be recompiled due to the change in compiler flags. But you seem to not like this method. If you want to modify the makefile, you can add the name of your makefile to every rule for compiling source files, for example: ...


1

It won't recompile because you don't have the makefile itself listed as a dependency. dep: $(CPPS) Makefile $(CC) $(CFLAGS) $(INC) -M $(CPPS) > dep That said, if you're feeding in make flags from the command line (e.g. CFLAGS=-O3 make all), make has no way of detecting that you've changed those and forcing a full build.


2

In your code very basic floating point maths is involved. And I bet if you turn optimizations on (even -O1) it gets optimized out because those values are constant expressions and so calculable at compile-time. SSE is used (movss, mulss) because it's the threshold of floating point calculus, if we want. SSE2 has no scope here. In order to find room for ...


0

The fix go into Project > Properties > C/C++ Build > Settings > Binary >Parsers : Make sure "Mach-O 64 Parser is selected" I made sure this was correct, and still recieved an error, so I would say the best solution is to do this step...then, BUILD the project, then press the "play" button and it should work (that is what fixed my problem)


2

To answer the question in the title, the instruction data32 data32 data32 data32 nopw %cs:0x0(%rax,%rax,1) is a 14-byte NOP (no operation) instruction that is used to pad the gap between the foo function and the main function to maintain 16-byte alignment. The x86 architecture has a large number of different NOP instructions of different sizes that can ...


2

The functions foo() is an infinite recursion without termination. Without optimization, gcc generates normal subroutine calls, which include stacking the return address at least. As the stack is limited, this will create an stack overflow which is _undefined_behaviour_. If optimizing, gcc detects foo() does not require a stack frame at all (there are no ...


3

You see an operand forwarding optimization of the cpu pipeline. Although it is an empty loop, gcc tries to optimize this as well :-). The cpu you are running has a superscalar architecture. It means, that it has a pipeline in it, and different phases of the executions of the consecuting instructions happen parallel. For example, if there is a mov eax, ebx ...


3

Optimization shouldn't affect the program's operations. Therefore, no type of optimization should affect network I\O used by the program, and anything else for that matter. If your program sends 10 kilobytes, it will send the same even after optimization. Optimization may affect the way structs are aligned among other things (like the size of the code, ...


2

Since this answer is still "unanswered," after talking with some people from Lounge<C++>, I think I can say that it's pretty obvious from the comments that this is due to an implementation error either on MinGW/MinGW-w64's or pthread's part at the time. Using gcc 4.9.1, MinGW-W64, the problem does not appear anymore. In fact, the program above appears ...


0

You are not return-ing anything from long long iterative (long long i). You should place a return statement at the end of every non-void function, otherwise, you get UB (undefined behaviour). However, the function may still "return" something. It will "return" whatever ends up in the processor register used to return values from functions, which may be what ...


0

Your iterative loop is also suboptimal, it uses more assignments than needed. This would be enough: int sum = fib1 + fib2; fib1 = fib2; fib2 = sum; And of course you could assign fib1/fib2 the initial values at the start instead of first initializing to 0 and then assigning.


0

Recursion will be slower than iterative or tail recursion version (which usually gets optimized to an iterative version). Examples of both are in this thread: Fibonacci Computation Time


0

If you really want to know the final order I would recommend you to create a class whose constructor logs the current timestamp and create several static instances of the class in each of your cpp files so that you could know the final order of initialization. Make sure to put some little time consuming operation in the constructor just so you don't get the ...


1

The error message says that function power is not defined. I am sure that somewhere in the book there is the definition of the function or there is an exercise that requires that you write the function yourself. It can be written simply. For example for positive n the function can look like int power(int m, int n) { int result = 1; for ( ; n; --n ...


0

There is nothing called power() defined in standard C library. If you want a power() function, you have to write your own before using it. If you want a library function, it is called pow(), defined in math library. Include the header file math.h, without having need to forward define the prototype. Also, don't forget to link against the math library using ...


1

The problem is with your code, not with your compilers or setup. The types of problems you are describing are examples of undefined behaviour that result from rather bad programming or coding techniques (in fact, some of them are fairly hard to achieve, without going out of your way to write very flawed code). The thing is, compilers are not required to ...


0

GCC's standard library does exactly what you told it, bugs and all. Most of the time, it behaves as you expected, and you don't realize that the bugs are there. Don't be fooled by the fact the program appears to work, it may still have bugs. Visual Studio has two variants of the standard library. In Release builds, it acts the same as GCC. It does ...


0

MSVC has "checked iterators" for std::vector, which perform a number of useful checks. You can turn on some of these types of checks in GCC by compiling with -D_GLIBCXX_DEBUG. If you want your access to always be bounds-checked, then you need to use std::vector::at(). Often, for performance reasons, it is better to ensure bounds checking outside of your loop ...


0

This depends on how the different memory sections are set up (typically in a linker script). For instance, the linker script for an STM32F4 may define the stack base as: __stack = ORIGIN(RAM) + LENGTH(RAM); Then the linker script variables can be accessed in C code with extern uint32_t __stack; void foo() { uint32_t stack_base = &__stack; }


3

E5-2680 is a Sandy Bridge CPU and both the latency and the reciprocal throughput for SQRTSD is 10 to 21 cycles/instr. So in loop or not, you should measure something close to the observed 21.8 cycles. The sqrt function in GLIBC simply checks the sign of the argument and arranges for the non-negative branch to get executed speculatively via branch prediction, ...


0

The problem is with 'readTSC()' function. To make sure you may inter change 'strategy I' with 'strategy II'. Now you will see that 'Strategy II' has taken more time. I think readTSC() function need more time when it runs at the first time.


3

It looks to me that Strategy I, uses sqrtsd instruction. This is because ucomisd instruction does not set the parity flag and the code jumps directly to L4. The for loop, Strategy II uses call sqrt to compute the square root. This may be an optimized version of sqrt, achieved through approximation, thus faster than the call to sqrtsd. Another important ...


1

I recently dealt with the problem. Inspired by this, I create the following macro __COMPACT_PRETTY_FUNCTION__: std::string computeMethodName(const std::string& function, const std::string& prettyFunction); #define __COMPACT_PRETTY_FUNCTION__ computeMethodName(__FUNCTION__,__PRETTY_FUNCTION__).c_str() //c_str() is optional std::string ...


2

there are advantages to using 'stack frames', but that does use more stack space to save the stack frame pointer. You can tell the compiler to not use stack frames. This will (generally) slightly increase the code size but will reduce the amount of stack used. you can only use char and short for values rather than int. It is poor programing practice, ...


0

Optimize binaries for space with -Os, not -O3, strip symbols with -s, and get rid of the stdc++ libraries you are linking in (std=c++14), that's not even a C++ program!


15

It's using the library sqrt function for error handling. As an optimization, it first tries to perform the square root by the inlined sqrtsd instruction, then checks the result against itself using the ucomisd instruction which sets the flags as follows: CASE (RESULT) OF UNORDERED: ZF,PF,CF 111; GREATER_THAN: ZF,PF,CF 000; LESS_THAN: ...


4

You library -or any code in idiomatic C- has several kinds of memory usage : binary code size, and indeed -Os should optimize that heap memory, using C dynamic allocation, that is malloc; you obviously should know how, and how much, heap memory is allocated (and later free-d). The actual memory consumption would depend upon your particular malloc ...


0

Apparently, there was a bug which causes the scanner transition table yy_nxt to be incorrectly written to the header file if %option full is present. This should be fixed in the latest version of flex (2.5.39). If you don't want to upgrade your version of flex, a simple workaround would be to avoid using %option full. You may well find that the speed ...


2

Regarding this line: if (firstName[20] == 'Vojta'){ firstName is an array and its' value was set via the scanf(). Therefore, first name will contain a terminating NULL char ('\0') therefore, the contents of firstName, if the user entered 'Vojta' would be 'V', 'o', 'j', 't', 'a', '\0' followed by 14 garbage characters Because of the trailing '\0' ...


9

Point 1 Use strcmp() to compare strings. Point 2 Change scanf("%s%s", firstName, lastName); to scanf("%19s %39s", firstName, lastName); and do check the return value of scanf() to ensure sucess. However, it's better if you use two scanf() seperately to take two inputs, that will be less error prone. Also, as a suggestion , you can read about ...


0

Versions of the solver built with different compilers can take different paths during the optimization process which can result in the behavior you observe. Things that can affect this are: differences in floating-point semantics (possibly caused by -ffast-math), different implementations of sort (qsort is normally not a stable sort) - this is mentioned by ...


0

The type Tcl_Interp doesn't have a member called result. Add -DUSE_INTERP_RESULT to CPPFLAGS when building with tcl support


2

The first line of startup_gcc.c is #include "setup.c"; do you see a problem? Don't build setup.c separately if you do this. Reading the error message multiple definition of '__cca' will help; computers rarely lie. You can compile this twice. Also, your .flashcca output section in the linker script has no input files and this should be fixed. For example, ...


0

In your C declaration, the section() attribute specifies an input section name for the linker. The .mydata name, specified in the SECTIONS part of the linker script is the name of an output section. In .mydata you tell the linker to place all the symbols from the "*(.data)" input sections into the .mydata output section, but your C attribute uses the name ...


0

The printf library in some small implementations does not include floating point support. Perhaps the dummy call is somehow causing a more complete (and larger) library to be used?


0

run-rime: Qt application will need ssleay32.dll, libeay32.dll (if on Windows) to run (place it near executable, or it may find it in system32 directory, again, if we are speaking of Windows). linked: Qt application will contain all needed OpenSSL code inside executable, so no external .dll/.so needed. On Linux, it might be more "natural" to use system-wide ...


0

The libstdc++6 package you have installed is not even in Ubuntu! ii libstdc++6:amd64 5-20150329-1ubuntu11 amd64 GNU Standard C++ Library v3 From packages.ubuntu.com: trusty (14.04LTS) (libs): GNU Standard C++ Library v3 4.8.2-19ubuntu1: amd64 i386 utopic (libs): GNU Standard C++ Library v3 4.9.1-16ubuntu6: amd64 i386 vivid (libs): GNU ...


3

By unspecified means the compiler is: free to make any decision it likes and is not required to document it. And implementation-defined means, the compiler is free to make any decision, and is required to document it.. If you consider this class (slightly modified your version): class X { private: int b; int z; public: char c; int ...


1

I change this: x86_64=set([0,1,5,8,9,10,11,12,16,25,63,158,219,231]) for this: x86_64=set([0,1,5,8,9,10,11,12,16,21,25,63,89,158,219,231]) in sample2.py, and It works.



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