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14

The 'frame' command will give you what you are looking for. (This can be abbreviated just 'f'). Here is an example: (gdb) frame \#0 zmq::xsub_t::xrecv (this=0x617180, msg_=0x7ffff00008e0) at xsub.cpp:139 139 int rc = fq.recv (msg_); (gdb) Without an argument, 'frame' just tells you where you are at (with an argument it changes the frame). More ...


14

Steps to debug coredump using gdb : Some generic help: gdb start GDB, with no debugging les gdb program begin debugging program gdb program core debug coredump core produced by program gdb --help describe command line options 1- First of all find the directory where the corefile is generated. 2- Then use "ls -ltr" command in the directory to find the ...


12

In theory you should be able to debug a GCC-built program with lldb and an LLVM-built program with gdb. In both cases you should compile with -g. This is because both compilers generate object files in the same format (e.g., on Linux, both will generate ELF files with DWARF debug info) and both debuggers know how to parse that format. In practice, both ...


11

It works when I change to sudo gdb executableFileName! :)


11

You need to do while (current != NULL) instead of current->next != NULL since the last element in the list will cause segfault.


10

Two things: The compiler may reserve space for intermediate expressions to which you did not give names in the source code (or conversely not allocate space for local variables that can live entirely in registers). The list of stack slots in the binary does not have to match the list of local variables in the source code. On some platforms, the compiler ...


9

On Intel, JMP, CALL, etc. are relative to the program counter of the next instruction. The next instruction in your case was at 0x4003be, and 0x4003be + 0x2004a2 == 0x600860


9

Use the string specifier: print /s x


9

In addition, since info locals does not display the arguments to the function you're in, use (gdb) info args For example: int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { argc = 6*7; //Break here. return 0; } argc and argv won't be shown by info locals. The message will be "No locals." Reference: info locals command.


8

You can delete all break points using del <start_breakpoint_num> - <end_breakpoint_num> To view the start_breakpoint_num and end_breakpoint_num use info break


8

Try this: set pagination off set $count=0 while ($pc != 0xyourstoppingaddress) stepi set $count=1+$count end print $count Then go get a cup of coffee. Or a long lunch.


8

I don't know if such a feature exist, but as a hack, you could LD_PRELOAD something that adds a handler on SIGSEGV that calls gdb: cat >> handler.c << 'EOF' #include <stdlib.h> #include <signal.h> void gdb(int sig) { system("exec xterm -e gdb -p $PPID"); abort(); } void _init() { signal(SIGSEGV, gdb); } EOF gcc -g -fpic ...


8

What is the recommended way to make sure that every access or write to array (allocated on stack) is actually valid (i.e. not provoking undefined behaviour) ? What if use clang on Linux with the options -fsanitize=addressand -fsanitize=undefined? It is also available in gcc: http://gcc.gnu.org/gcc-4.8/changes.html. clang with the option ...


8

I.1 Codesigning the Debugger The Darwin Kernel requires the debugger to have special permissions before it is allowed to control other processes. These permissions are granted by codesigning the GDB executable. Without these permissions, the debugger will report error messages such as: Starting program: /x/y/foo Unable to find Mach task port ...


7

first of all, push ebp and then mov ebp, esp are two instructions that are common at the beggining of a procedure. ESP register is an indicator for the top of the stack - so it changes constantly as the stack grows or shrinks. EBP is a helping register here. First we push content of ebp on stack. then we copy ESP (current stack top adress) to ebp - that is ...


7

This lldb command should do the trick: target stop-hook add --one-liner "frame variable" Example: (lldb) b print_all_variables Breakpoint 2: where = stophook`print_all_variables + 10 at main.c:14, address = 0x0000000100000eca (lldb) target stop-hook add --one-liner "frame variable" Stop hook #1 added. (lldb) c Process 4838 resuming (int) a = 10 (int) b ...


7

That's because you're on a 64 bit machine, $esp is a 32 bit register. You'll want to do x/s $rsp


7

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault. 0x0000000000400bbb in GivePeriod (Cx=-0,75, Cy=-0, Iteration_Max=650000, precision=0,00033329999999999997) at m.c:137 137 orbit[0][0]=0.0; double orbit[Iteration_Max+1][2]; 650001 * 2 * 8 (bytes/double) = 10400016 That's probably bigger than your maximum stack size;1 on linux you can check that ...


7

In case you want to see the local variables of a calling function use select-frame before info locals E.g.: (gdb) bt #0 0xfec3c0b5 in _lwp_kill () from /lib/libc.so.1 #1 0xfec36f39 in thr_kill () from /lib/libc.so.1 #2 0xfebe3603 in raise () from /lib/libc.so.1 #3 0xfebc2961 in abort () from /lib/libc.so.1 #4 0xfebc2bef in _assert_c99 () from ...


7

This happens if actually a "pure virtual" function was called, which results in a crash. A pure virtual function is one declared: virtual void pureVirtualFunction() = 0; Usually the compiler will detect if you omit to implement a pure virtual function. But there can be situations where it can't. Call of Pure Virtual Function in Base Constructor One of ...


7

Second part is easily explained (as Flortify correctly stated): GDB shows original memory contents, not the breakpoint "bytes". In default mode it actually even removes breakpoints when debugger suspends and re-inserts them before continuing. Users typically want to see their code, not strange modified instructions used for breakpoints. With your C code you ...


7

How come the heap is that big when all I did was allocating space for a single int? I did a simple test on Linux. When one calls calloc glibc calls at some point sbrk() to get memory from OS: (gdb) bt #0 0x0000003a1d8e0a0a in brk () from /lib64/libc.so.6 #1 0x0000003a1d8e0ad7 in sbrk () from /lib64/libc.so.6 #2 0x0000003a1d87da49 in ...


7

My understanding is that the compiler/linker includes only the member functions present in the source code and those are the ones I can use in gdb. Your understanding is incorrect / incomplete. std::vector is a template class. Without explicit instantiation, the compiler is required to instantiate only the methods called (usually a subset of methods ...


6

The solution is to cast the pointers before dereferencing them. For example, picking up where we left off above: (gdb) x/s **((char ***) (0xc + $ebp)) 0xbfffedc8: "/var/tmp/SO-attempt-to-dereference-generic-pointer/example" (gdb) x/s *(*((char ***) (0xc + $ebp)) + 1) 0xbfffee03: "first" (gdb) x/s *(*((char ***) (0xc + $ebp)) + 2) 0xbfffee09: "second" ...


6

lldb's expression parser doesn't currently have the equivalent of gdb's foo.c::function meta-symbol to encode a function from a specific source file. Please feel free to file a bug requesting this at bugreporter.apple.com. It will get duped to the one I filed a while ago, but dups are votes for features, and we haven't gotten around to this one yet ...


6

You can try to do it like this: First start nodes with gdbserver on remote hosts. It is even possible to start it without a program to debug, if you start it with --multi flag. When server is in multi mode, you can control it from your local session, I mean that you can make it start a program you want to debug. Then, start multiple inferiors in your gdb ...


6

Macros are handled by the pre-processor. The compiler doesn't even know about them. However, if lucky, gcc's option -g3 would do the job and generate code allowing gdb to expand a macro. From the gdb documentation (emphasis by me): -glevel [...] Level 3 includes extra information, such as all the macro definitions present in the program. ...


6

You are calling std::string::append, that ultimately results in delete getting called. If we go through the steps involved in std::string::append, it might make more sense why delete gets called. Say you have: std::string s("abc"); s.append("def"); When you create s, memory has to be allocated to hold "abc". At the end of s.append("def");, there has to ...


6

It's because the size of int and the size of int16_t are different. The size of int is (usually) 32 bits (four bytes) while int16_t is 16 bits (two bytes). So when you write an int to a int16_t variable you write two bytes too many, and leads to undefined behavior (and in this case will "smash" the stack). The problem is more specifically because you call ...


6

How does gdb access another process virtual memory on Linux? Is it all done via /proc? On Linux for reading memory: 1) If the number of bytes to read is fewer than 3 * sizeof (long) or the filesystem /proc is unavailable or reading from /proc/PID/mem is unsuccessful then ptrace is used with PTRACE_PEEKTEXT to read data. These are these conditions in ...



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