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A couple of problems. You are trying to reference one control in two different places: in the paintObject1 control you added to the form, and the same control in the paintObjectDiagram class. Even if you add a new PaintObject class to the PaintObjectDiagram class, it still doesn't "add" the control to the form's control collection. The PaintObjectDiagram ...


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Internally GDI+ uses a fixed point coordinate representation for some operations. You may be running into a 24 bit limit for the integer portion of the coordinates. The work around is to avoid the translation: no one can see anything drawn at those coordinates. If you are doing the translation in order to render to a printer or bitmap, you will need to scale ...


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I'd suspect that your size calculation is off. Looking at my C++ code, I have this calculation based on the information in the enhanced metafile header where hEMF is the handle of the metafile. We then draw the image using a Graphics directly to the screen using those dimensions. Hope this or the MSDN link helps a little. Sorry it's not more complete. ...


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This is normal behaviour. You must change your drawing order to get it right. Since you draw the text onto a semi-transparent surface its anti-aliasing pixels will be semi-transparent, too, but somwehre in-between the text color and the background of the first image. Now, if you draw the result onto another image you will have uniform transparent pixels ...


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I ended up having to rework everything to be Inch Unit based. The font simply doesn't have an easy way of scaling between the units and the Inch Unit turned out to be the easiest solution.


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If you must use GDI+ then let it handle the scaling using this method can leverage hardware acceleration if available as opposed to drawing into bitmaps. But agreed with other poster there are better frameworks for this have a look at XNA. public partial class Form1 : Form { public Form1() { InitializeComponent(); var gameTick = new ...


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You could just use the DrawImage of the Graphics object to paint your 320x200 bitmap on a rectangle of any size. By setting the interpolation mode on the graphics object first, you can control the way the image is painted when resized. Different interpolation modes should give different visual results and chances are you will be satisfied with one of ...


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I don't see anywhere in your code where the GameLoop method is called. Your code worked for me after I changed the 30 to 30d and added this in the end of the Form's constructor: new Thread(GameLoop) {IsBackground = true}.Start();


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Here is your problem: long interval = (long)TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1 / 30).TotalMilliseconds; You are making an integer division, the result will be 0. Fix it like this, to turn it into a floating point operation: long interval = (long)TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1 / 30.0d).TotalMilliseconds; Your code has other problems, like busy waiting in the while ...


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When you replace sourceImage with the reference from CropBitmap, the original file is still open. You will have to Dispose of it after reading it from the file, open a new Bitmap and save it overwriting the existing one. private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e) { Bitmap sourceImage = new Bitmap("images/sourceImage.jpg"); Bitmap ...


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See the documentation for this constructor. Specifically the section that reads: The file remains locked until the Bitmap is disposed. You must dispose the sourceImage before saving a new one. So, use different variables: var sourceImage = new Bitmap("images/sourceImage.jpg"); var croppedImage = CropBitmap(sourceImage, 0, 0, sourceImage.Width, 50); ...


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It's simple: Graphics graph = Graphics.FromImage(bitmap); graph.Clear(Color.Yellow); // set color for background


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This topic is rather old but I just had the same problem and spent many hours to find a solution that preserves the transparency in the PNG file. Since the problem can be easily solved in Java... sun.awt.shell.ShellFolder sf = sun.awt.shell.ShellFolder.getShellFolder(file); ImageIcon icon = new ImageIcon(sf.getIcon(true)); FileOutputStream bos ...


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//Here is corrected code without memory leak and ReleaseDc return 1 #include <Windows.h> #include "resource.h" using namespace std; LRESULT WINAPI WinProc(HWND hWnd,UINT uMsg,WPARAM wParam,LPARAM lParam); HWND hWnd = 0; HDC hdc = 0; int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInst, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow) { MSG msg; ...


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The un-solution: Don't use Graphics. If your application runs SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false) at startup (which it should, because it yields better text rendering), you should use TextRenderer.MeasureText instead of MeasureString, because otherwise you will use GDI+ for measuring and GDI for drawing which will create discrepancies between actual ...


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Caching System.Drawing objects is a mistake. They are very cheap to create, very expensive to keep around. They are allocated on a special heap that all processes on a desktop need to share. The heap size is limited to 65535 objects. Creating objects like a brush or a pen takes roughly a microsecond, miniscule compared to the cost of the operation you ...


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It seems like the limitation. If I use DrawPath instead of DrawLines, it works correctly.


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Hans Passant was correct. The issue was a bitmap that was being duplicated, though it's still not clear to me why this was causing the garbage collector to apparently fail to do its job. I have some back-end classes in this program which take images from cameras and convert the bitmaps to the appropriate format (for example, the YUV422 to RGB conversion I ...


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When you are loading an imagefrom a Stream, You have to keep the stream open for the lifetime of the image, see MSDN Image.FromStream. I think the exception is caused because the memory stream gets closed even before the image gets disposed. You can change your code like this byte[] bitmapData = new byte[imageText.Length]; MemoryStream streamBitmap; ...


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+1 to mistika Adobe specification contains description of PSD clipping path. The last revision is dated by Oct 2013 and looks like Adobe is currently working on it. At least I have feeling that new stuff was added. If you are looking for a code using PSD format, take a look into libpsd. That’s a nice open source, pretty easy to read. Sometimes more ...


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how to locally refer to the image (it is set to always copy) You can add the image to a resource file and then reference that Image from there within the code. (See link http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/7k989cfy%28v=vs.90%29.aspx) How to get the image centered in the square, and how to keep the image stationary when the square moves? This ...


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The ControlPaint class has many useful tools for painting common control-related graphical elements. It includes a DrawFocusRectangle method, which should do what you are looking for. From the MSDN: Draws a focus rectangle on the specified graphics surface and within the specified bounds. ... A focus rectangle is a dotted rectangle that Windows uses ...


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I read few sites and come up with solution as, using (System.Drawing.Graphics graphics = CreateGraphics()) { System.Drawing.Size size = TextRenderer.MeasureText(graphics, id, e.Appearance.Font); if (size.Width > e.Column.Width) { int charFit = (int)(((double)e.Column.Width / (double)size.Width) * (double)id.Length); if ...


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Stepping through the code I saw that RGB.LockBits was the one increasing the RAM usage. I added a GC.Collect() every ten calls (once per second) and now things are fine. What you're saying is basically that a normal garbage collection will reclaim everything, and the issue is that the garbage collector isn't executed when you expect it to. Are your ...


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You must apply the transformation BEFORE drawing the line! var g = Graphics.FromImage(bitmap); g.ScaleTransform(10, 10); using (pn = new Pen(Color.Wheat, -1)) { g.DrawLine(pn, 0, 0, 10, 10); } Transformations are applied to the transformation matrix of the graphics object (g.Transform). Also make use of the using statement in order to dispose the ...


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@Alan Jackson's answer is almost perfect - but his first (and most up-voted) comment suggests that endpoints are not correctly handled. To ensure the point is on the segment, simply create a box where the segment is a diagonal, then check if the point is contained within. Here is the pseudo-code: Given Line ab, comprised of points a and b, and Point p, in ...


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You're loading the file into memory from the hard disk each time you call .FromFile(). Store the image in your Ground class on instantiation (or whenever, just not when you are calling it in Draw()) and this should be fixed.


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I've created a small solution to compare the drawing speed, you can try it yourself on your own machine. Link to solution


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The problem is solved by adding the following: g.TextRenderingHint = System.Drawing.Text.TextRenderingHint.SingleBitPerPixel;


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Try to create a symlink /opt/mono-3/lib/libgdiplus.so pointing to /usr/lib/libgdiplus.so.


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Your transform matrix is the inverse of what it needs to be. You can tell because your TransformPoints call is going from World to Device coordinates, but your mouse input is already in Device coordinates.



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