Hot answers tagged

659

Shuffle any (I)List with an extension method based on the Fisher-Yates shuffle: private static Random rng = new Random(); public static void Shuffle<T>(this IList<T> list) { int n = list.Count; while (n > 1) { n--; int k = rng.Next(n + 1); T value = list[k]; list[k] = list[n]; ...


347

var distinctItems = items.GroupBy(x => x.Id).Select(y => y.First());


328

Use the Insert method: ti.Insert(0, initialItem);


225

var distinctItems = items.Distinct(); To match on only some of the properties, create a custom equality comparer, e.g.: class DistinctItemComparer : IEqualityComparer<Item> { public bool Equals(Item x, Item y) { return x.Id == y.Id && x.Name == y.Name && x.Code == y.Code && x....


139

Type type = pi.PropertyType.PropertyType; if(type.IsGenericType && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(List<>)) { Type itemType = type.GetGenericArguments()[0]; // use this... } More generally, to support any IList<T>, you need to check the interfaces: foreach (Type interfaceType in type.GetInterfaces()) { if (...


139

I would suggest writing an extension method for this: public static IEnumerable<T> Select<T>(this IDataReader reader, Func<IDataReader, T> projection) { while (reader.Read()) { yield return projection(reader); } } You can then use LINQ's ToList() method to convert that into a ...


135

If we only need to shuffle items in a completely random order (just to mix the items in a list), I prefer this simple yet effective code that orders items by guid... var shuffledcards = cards.OrderBy(a => Guid.NewGuid());


84

Try the following var list = arrayList.Cast<int>().ToList(); This will only work though using the C# 3.5 compiler because it takes advantage of certain extension methods defined in the 3.5 framework.


64

The easiest way to get a new list would be: List<long> unique = longs.Distinct().ToList(); Is that good enough for you, or do you need to mutate the existing list? The latter is significantly more long-winded. Note that Distinct() isn't guaranteed to preserve the original order, but in the current implementation it will - and that's the most ...


61

Use Enum's static method, GetNames. It returns a string[], like so: Enum.GetNames(typeof(DataSourceTypes)) If you want to create a method that does only this for only one type of enum, and also converts that array to a List, you can write something like this: public List<string> GetDataSourceTypes() { return Enum.GetNames(typeof(DataSourceTypes)...


56

Give this a try: foreach (PropertyInfo propertyInfo in obj.GetType().GetProperties()) { // do stuff here } Also please note that Type.GetProperties() has an overload which accepts a set of binding flags so you can filter out properties on a different criteria like accessibility level, see MSDN for more details: Type.GetProperties Method (BindingFlags) ...


51

Extension method for IEnumerable: public static IEnumerable<T> Randomize<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source) { Random rnd = new Random(); return source.OrderBy<T, int>((item) => rnd.Next()); }


48

There's a handy little method File.WriteAllLines -- no need to open a StreamWriter yourself: In .net 4: File.WriteAllLines(speichern, ausgabeListe); In .net 3.5: File.WriteAllLines(speichern, ausgabeListe.ToArray()); Likewise, you could replace your reading logic with File.ReadAllLines, which returns an array of strings (use ToList() on that if you ...


47

I'm bit surprised by all the clunky versions of this simple algorithm here. Fisher-Yates (or Knuth shuffle) is bit tricky but very compact. If you go to Wikipedia, you would see a version of this algorithm that has for-loop in reverse and lot of people don't really seem to understand why is it in reverse. The key reason is that this version of algorithm ...


44

AllDogs.Where(d => d.Id == "2").First().Name = "some value"; However, a safer version of that might be this: var dog = AllDogs.Where(d => d.Id == "2").FirstOrDefault(); if (dog != null) { dog.Name = "some value"; } As Reed stated, we can just go straight to First or even FirstOrDefault here: AllDogs.First(d => d.Id == "2").Name = "some value"; ...


37

You can use this extension method for enumerables containing more complex types: IEnumerable<Foo> distinctList = sourceList.DistinctBy(x => x.FooName); public static IEnumerable<TSource> DistinctBy<TSource, TKey>( this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector) { var knownKeys = new HashSet<...


31

I have seen systems that use Reflection and attributes on Properties or fields to maps DataReaders to objects. (A bit like what LinqToSql does.) They save a bit of typing and may reduce the number of errors when coding for DBNull etc. Once you cache the generated code they can be faster then most hand written code as well, so do consider the “high road” ...


29

It's because you used Function instead of Sub. Since a Function returns a value, the compiler considers that the equals sign (=) is used as a comparison, not an assignment. If you change Function to Sub, the compiler would correctly consider the equals sign as an assignment: TempList.ForEach(Sub(obj) obj.Deleted = True) If you had a multiline lambda; you ...


28

There is a much easy way: public XmlDocument GetEntityXml<T>() { XmlDocument xmlDoc = new XmlDocument(); XPathNavigator nav = xmlDoc.CreateNavigator(); using (XmlWriter writer = nav.AppendChild()) { XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(List<T>), new XmlRootAttribute("TheRootElementName")); ser.Serialize(...


27

Using the sort method and lambda expressions, it is really easy. myList.Sort((a, b) => String.Compare(a.Name, b.Name)) The above example shows how to sort by the Name property of your object type, assuming Name is of type string.


27

Try List.ofSeq in the Microsoft.FSharp.Collections namespace. # List.ofSeq : seq<'T> -> 'T list It's not specifically for System.Collections.Generic.List<T>, but for IEnumerable<T> (seq<'T> in F#) types in general, so it should still work. (It's also not strictly built into the F# language, but neither is ...


24

If you have linq available you can do var ListOfA = ListOfB.Cast<A>().ToList();


24

If there is something that is throwing off your Distinct query, you might want to look at MoreLinq and use the DistinctBy operator and select distinct objects by id. var distinct = items.DistinctBy( i => i.Id );


24

After adding an item to a list, you can replace it by writing list[someIndex] = new MyClass(); You can modify an existing item in the list by writing list[someIndex].SomeProperty = someValue; EDIT: You can write var index = list.FindIndex(c => c.Number == someTextBox.Text); list[index] = new SomeClass(...);


22

I have written the following method using this case. First, add the namespace: System.Reflection For Example: T is return type(ClassName) and dr is parameter to mapping DataReader C#, Call mapping method like the following: List<Person> personList = new List<Person>(); personList = DataReaderMapToList<Person>(dataReaderForPerson); ...


21

Adding the Required attribute to a list-style property doesn't really do what you want. The will complain if the list isn't created, but won't complain if the list exists with 0 item in it. However, it should be easy enough to derive your own data annotations attribute and make it check the list for Count > 0. Something like this (not tested yet): [...


21

The following works and as per StaxMan's advice no longer uses the deprecated static collectionType() method. public class SoApp { /** * @param args * @throws Exception */ public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception { System.out.println("Hello World!"); String s = "[{\"user\":\"TestCity\",\"role\":\"TestCountry\...


20

(I assume here that Bar and Baz are both subtypes of Foo.) List<? extends Foo> means a list of elements of some type, which is a subtype of Foo, but we don't know which type. Examples of such lists would be a ArrayList<Foo>, a LinkedList<Bar> and a ArrayList<Baz>. As we don't know which subtype is the type parameter, we can't put ...


19

One big difference is that List<Employee> can be expanded (you can call Add on it) or contracted (you can call Remove on it) whereas Employee[] is fixed in size. Thus, Employee[] is tougher to work with unless the need calls for it.


19

Executive summary MyList.Free is sufficient. Detailed answer The TList<T> generic container owns its contents. When you free the container, the contents are also disposed of. Now, if T is an unmanaged reference, either a pointer or a class, then the list owns the reference. It does not own that which the reference refers to. So if you have TList&...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible