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11

GENSYM creates uninterned symbols. When the macro runs normally, this isn't a problem, because the same uninterned symbol is being substituted throughout the expression. But when you copy and paste the expression into the REPL, this doesn't happen. #: tells the reader to return an uninterned symbol. As a result, each occurrence of #:G2867 is a different ...


11

The code, after being printed and read back, is no longer the same code. In particular, the two instances of #:G2867 in the printed representation would be read back as two separated symbols (albeit sharing the same name), while they should be the same in the original internal representation. Try setting *PRINT-CIRCLE* to T to preserve the identity in the ...


9

Symbols can be interned in a package or not. A symbol interned in a package can be looked up and found. An uninterned symbol can't be looked up in a package. Only one symbol of a certain name can be in a package. There is only one symbol CL-USER::FRED. You write: So as far as i know the uninterned symbols are the symbols for which the evaluator does't ...


8

Auto-gensym'd symbols are only valid within the syntax-quote that defines them and they don't work in unquoted code because that is not part of the syntax quote. Here the symbol x# gets replaced by it's gensym because it is within the scope of the syntax quote: core> `(let [x# 1] x#) (clojure.core/let [x__1942__auto__ 1] x__1942__auto__) And if you ...


5

Don't test how it works (its expansion), test that it works. If you test the particular expansion, you are chained to that implementation strategy; instead, just test that (m1 2 inc) returns 3, and whatever other test cases are necessary to comfort your conscience, and then you can be happy that your macro is working.


4

Your method (calling gensym) is the right one. However in some cases you can get by with a clever use of doto, -> or ->>. See: `(let [x# 1] (doto x# ~@(repeat 3 `println)))


3

I think you can avoid gensym here at all. I don't see how you can "pollute" environment by not using gensym. Example without gensym: (defmacro def-handler [& addresses] `(defn handler [~'request] (case (~'request :uri) ~@(mapcat (fn[x] [(str "/" x) (list x 'request)]) addresses) "/" (home ~'request) (status-response 404 (str ...


1

The problem with your macro code is that the dynamic symbol which is part of quasiquoting can't be use outside quoted part i.e in the unquote/unquote-splicing code. However the other way is possible, that is you do gensym in the macro execution part and use that inside quasiquoting part as shown below: (defmacro def-handler [& addresses] ...



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