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197

Calculate the distance between two coordinates by latitude and longitude, including a Javascript implementation. West and South locations are negative. Remember minutes and seconds are out of 60 so S31 30' is -31.50 degrees. Don't forget to convert degrees to radians. Many languages have this function. Or its a simple calculation: radians = degrees ...


54

I've got XML for US state polygons here. I use them like this. I deliberately kept the detail fairly light to reduce the loading time and end up with a map that's reasonably responsive in slow browsers. I don't have anything for Canada.


49

You've got a serious case of the magic numbers in the code. The expression: (60 * 1.1515 * 1.609344 * 1000) appears twice, but there's not much explanation of it. With some help: 1.609344 is the number of kilometres in a mile; 60 is the number of minutes in a degree; 1000 is the number of metres in a kilometre; and 1.1515 is the number of statute ...


45

Look for haversine with Google; here is my solution: #include <math.h> #include "haversine.h" #define d2r (M_PI / 180.0) //calculate haversine distance for linear distance double haversine_km(double lat1, double long1, double lat2, double long2) { double dlong = (long2 - long1) * d2r; double dlat = (lat2 - lat1) * d2r; double a = ...


38

I think the return measurement depends upon the Spatial Reference Identifiers (SRIDs) of your geography data type. The default is 4326 which is in meters. There' a table in the DB you can check Select * from sys.spatial_reference_systems


31

If you need to take the curvature of the earth into account, the Great-Circle distance is what you're looking for. The Wikipedia article probably does a better job of explaining how the formula works than me, and there's also this aviation formulary page that covers that goes into more detail. The formulas are only the first part of the puzzle though, if ...


29

Most geolocation services allow you to download a database full of IP Address to city or country maps. Some also provide web service apis for free (limited number of requests) or a paid subscription. MaxMind has one such service that you can use which is free to determine the user's location. Their minFraud service allows 500 free queries per day. A ...


28

This algorithm is known as the Great Circle distance.


28

C# Version of Haversine double _eQuatorialEarthRadius = 6378.1370D; double _d2r = (Math.PI / 180D); private int HaversineInM(double lat1, double long1, double lat2, double long2) { return (int)(1000D * HaversineInKM(lat1, long1, lat2, long2)); } private double HaversineInKM(double lat1, double long1, double lat2, double long2) { double dlong = ...


26

The Haversine formula assumes a spherical earth. However, the shape of the earh is more complex. An oblate spheroid model will give better results. If such accuracy is needed, you should better use Vincenty inverse formula. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vincenty's_formulae for details. Using it, you can get a 0.5mm accuracy for the spheroid model. There ...


18

It's because in Python, all the trig functions use radians, not degrees. You can either convert the numbers manually to radians, or use the radians function from the math module: from math import sin, cos, sqrt, atan2, radians # approximate radius of earth in km R = 6373.0 lat1 = radians(52.2296756) lon1 = radians(21.0122287) lat2 = radians(52.406374) ...


17

I was able to use Geotools 2.4 to get something that works, based on some example code. double utmZoneCenterLongitude = ... // Center lon of zone, example: zone 10 = -123 int zoneNumber = ... // zone number, example: 10 double latitude, longitude = ... // lat, lon in degrees MathTransformFactory mtFactory = ...


15

This is very easy to do with geography type in SQL Server 2008. SELECT geography::Point(lat1, lon1, 4326).STDistance(geography::Point(lat2, lon2, 4326)) -- computes distance in meters using eliptical model, accurate to the mm 4326 is SRID for WGS84 elipsoidal Earth model


15

In fact Entity Framework 5 components that are shipped with .NET Framework 4.5 do support spatial types. Take a look at this walkthrough. EDIT With EF6 you can use spatial types on both .NET Framework 4 and .NET Framework 4.5


15

Apparently the region names used by visualization API are somewhat incorrect (e.g. Sindh is referenced as Sind in the API). However, the most recent ISO 3166 country + subdivision codes seem to work where the names don't. Here is the complete map for Pakistan: function drawMap() { var data = google.visualization.arrayToDataTable([ ['Province'], ...


14

Geography is the type that is intended for plotting points on the earth. If you have a table that stores Google Maps points like this: CREATE TABLE geo_locations ( location_id uniqueidentifier NOT NULL, position_point geography NOT NULL ); then you could fill points in it with this stored procedure: CREATE PROCEDURE ...


14

If all you want to do with SqlGeography is track points and take advantage of SQL Server 2008's spatial indices, you can, as others have noted, hide your spatial data column from Linq to SQL and use UDFs or stored procedures. Suppose that you have a table AddressFields that includes Latitude and Longitude fields. Add that table to your DBML file, and write ...


12

I'd probably use a modified* version of k-means clustering using the cartesian (e.g. WGS-84 ECF) coordinates for your points. It's easy to implement & converges quickly, and adapts to your data no matter what it looks like. Plus, you can pick k to suit your bandwidth requirements, and each cluster will have the same number of associated points (mod k). ...


12

It depends on how accurate you need it to be, if you need pinpoint accuracy, is best to look at an algorithm with uses an ellipsoid, rather than a sphere, such as Vincenty's algorithm, which is accurate to the mm. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vincenty%27s_algorithm


12

This is the kind of calculation that numpy is really good at. Rather than looping over the entire large set of coordinates, you can compute the distance between a single point and the entire dataset in a single calculation. With my tests below, you can get an order of magnitude speed increase. Here's some timing tests with your haversine method, your dumb ...


11

It's also worth noting that MaxMind allow you to download their geolocation database as a CSV file: http://www.maxmind.com/app/geolitecity


11

Yes you can but the geometry datatype is more forgiving than the geography in my experience. So there is some data you might have in geometry that you can't convert. This article from Spatial Ed was very helpful explaining how to fix data problems and also has some sample queries to convert from Geom to Geog.


11

Spatial types are not supported by Linq to SQL. Support is not "not great" - it's nonexistent. You can read them as BLOBs, but you can't do that by simply changing the column type in Linq to SQL. You need to alter your queries at the database level to return the column as a varbinary, using the CAST statement. You can do this at the table level by adding ...


11

Java Version of Haversine Algorithm based on Roman Makarov`s reply to this thread public class HaversineAlgorithm { static final double _eQuatorialEarthRadius = 6378.1370D; static final double _d2r = (Math.PI / 180D); public static int HaversineInM(double lat1, double long1, double lat2, double long2) { return (int) (1000D * ...


10

I get this sort of information from the Aviation Formulary. In this case: Distance between points The great circle distance d between two points with coordinates {lat1,lon1} and {lat2,lon2} is given by: d=acos(sin(lat1)*sin(lat2)+cos(lat1)*cos(lat2)*cos(lon1-lon2)) A mathematically equivalent formula, which is less subject to ...


10

This is a little bit tricky, but it is certainly possible. Let's start by calculating the bearing from one point to another. Given a starting point, a bearing, and a distance, the following function will return the destination point: CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[func_MoveTowardsPoint](@start_point geography, ...


10

Here it is in C# (lat and long in radians): double CalculateGreatCircleDistance(double lat1, double long1, double lat2, double long2, double radius) { return radius * Math.Acos( Math.Sin(lat1) * Math.Sin(lat2) + Math.Cos(lat1) * Math.Cos(lat2) * Math.Cos(long2 - long1)); } If your lat and long are in degrees then divide by 180/PI to ...


10

I am in the same boat, and thanks to your start I got it working (inserting and reading spatial data). For anyone else who is interested, firstly the GisSharpBlog.NetTopologySuite.Geometries.Point class is in NetTopologySuite.dll which is part of the nHibernate.Spatial download. Secondly, as per James point, make sure you set the SRID to 4326. And lastly, ...


10

As stated by Google Charts developer docs, it is not supported for all countries (if you try this for US, you will see it is working, although I could not make it paint Alabama. If you try Canada, Ontario is not painted). resolution: 'provinces' - Supported only for country regions and US state regions. Not supported for all countries; please test a ...


9

I suggest JCoord. It allows you to convert between various cartographic coordinate schemes using a very simple API. Iy you're feeling saucy, have a look at the source code; it's pages and pages of dense trigonometry. Splendid stuff. There's also a javascript version called JSCoord.



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