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6

Is it possible to read a binary file line by line? Every file is, in principle, binary, because that's just how computers work. Now, saying "I'm trying to read it line-by-line" clearly means you're treating it as a text file – "line" is a text concept. The file is very large and therefore is in binary format. That's top-notch bullshit. Size ...


3

From the getline manual page`: If *lineptr is set to NULL and *n is set 0 before the call, then getline() will allocate a buffer for storing the line Since you pass a NULL pointers as the n argument, the call will not allocate a buffer for you. You need to explicitly pass a pointer to a variable of size_t that has been initialized to zero: char *nfile ...


3

The issue is in the getline call. The second parameter passed in is NULL which is incorrect. Rather it should be like this: size_t n = 0; getline(&nfile,&n,stdin); As per the man page for getline, states: ssize_t getline(char **lineptr, size_t *n, FILE *stream); If *lineptr is set to NULL and *n is set 0 before the call, then getline() ...


2

The code std::cin>>name; is equivalent to operator>>(std::cin, name); this calls the function (declared in <string>): template <class CharT, class Traits, class Allocator> std::basic_istream<CharT, Traits>& operator>>( std::basic_istream<CharT, Traits>& is, std::basic_string<CharT, ...


2

cin is for reading, so stream direction is inverse: cin >> param1 >> param2;


2

The input operator >> separates on white-space. Instead you might want to use std::getline to read the semicolon separated fields. Something like std::string id_string, money_string; while (std::getline(ClientsFile, id_string, ';') && std::getline(ClientsFile, name, ';') && std::getline(ClientsFile, money_string)) { ...


2

Your text file contains some unicode homoglyph for - rather than an actual -. This is clear since 181+'-' is 0xe2, the lead byte for a 3-byte character.


2

If argv[1] were "-i", then strcmp would return 0. But it's not. Look closely and you will see that it is "–i", which is a different character. (It's longer and multibyte.)


2

If your file is structured into lines, and each line is terminated with a \n then it is a text file. Every file is binary underneath, and text files are just a special kind of binary file. So, given that, the code you've shown is likely to work fine for files of any size. You should really remove the ios:binary, but I don't expect it to make any ...


2

Your std::cin::ignore calls are not helping you. They are only needed after an input that does not extract the end-of-line character (>>). std::string first_name; std::string last_name; int age; std::cout << "Enter first name: "; std::getline(std::cin, first_name); // end of line is removed std::cout << "Enter last name: "; ...


1

According to the documentation of std::basic_istream::ignore(), this function behaves as an Unformatted Input Function which mean it is going to block and wait for user input if there is nothing to skip in the buffer. In your case both of your ignore statments are not neccessary since std::getline() will not leave the new line character in the buffer. So ...


1

I recommend removing the ignore function calls: std::string name; std::cout << "Enter name: "; std::getline(cin, name); unsigned int age; std::cout << "Enter age: "; std::cin >> age;


1

cin is a model of a std::istream. With any istream the result of stream >> x is a reference to the istream itself. The istream contains some flags to indicate the success or failure of the previous operations. istream is also convertible to bool. The value of the bool will be true if the previous operations were successful and false otherwise (for ...


1

Yes, that does not work, because cin then waits for the second parameter. You'd need to use getline() and parse the string manually. One possibility is to do this: string params, param1, param2; getline(cin, params); istringstream str(params); str >> param1 >> param2; Note that the param2 will be empty then if only one param passed, because ...


1

It looks like you file has some other line endings than you expect. It could have a \r while you expect it to have \n. If that is the case then std::getline tries to read whole 30GB file in to line std::string. I suggest you check what line ending you have in your file, to verify above. If that is the case then you can use line reading function from this ...


1

When you do cin >> age, a newline remains in the input buffer. On the second call to getline(), it sees this newline and terminates immediately, without taking any input. To resolve this, use cin.ignore(); between the cin and getline() statements.



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