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while(getline(level, transferLine).good()); This loop has an empty controlled statement. So the loop reads the lines but doesn't do anything with them, until on loop termination when only the last read line will be put to the vector. while(getline(level, transferLine))//; remove this semi-colon { int counter = 0;//might want to consider the ...


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This is the answer to several iterations of this question, so it may seem a little out of whack with what is being asked above. The problem is that you are using std::getline to read up to the ':' character. You then use the overloaded operator >> for std::string, to do another read into the same string name overwriting it. This time it reads to the ...


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You are not using correct function. Instead of cin.getline() you should use std::getline(cin, myText) cin.getline() expects a pre-allocated char*, and your myText is not. It is also very hard to somehow manage to preallocate a buffer long enough for std::basic_istream::getline(), so this function is almost never useful at all.


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You can use seekg to jump to any position in the file. file.seekg(-1,ios_base::end); // go to one position before the EOF char c; file.get(c); // Read current character if(c=='\n'){ cout<<"yes"<<endl; // You have new_line character } So we jump to one position before the EOF and read the last character. If ...


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When you do cin >> age, a newline remains in the input buffer. On the second call to getline(), it sees this newline and terminates immediately, without taking any input. To resolve this, use cin.ignore(); between the cin and getline() statements.


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The problem is that std::getline takes exactly one character as a delimiter. It defaults to a newline but if you use another character then newline is NOT a delimiter any more and so you end up with newlines in your text. The answer is to read the entire line into a string using std::getline with the default (newline) delimiter and then use a string stream ...


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The problem with getline is that it reads lines and puts them into a std::string, but strips new line characters. What you will need is to use binary mode reading functions. The most difficult task is to make it find all possible new lines combinations and also work with various file sizes, and finally make it look elegant. Below is my try at how to do it. ...


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There are three different methods to indicate the new line. Two characters CR LF (\r\n): DOS, OS/2, Microsoft Windows, Symbian, DEC RT-1 1 One character CR (\r): Commodore, Apple II, Mac OS (until version 9), Microware OS-9 One character LF (\n): Unix, BeOS, AmigaOS, MorphOS, RISC OS, GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, Multics Dont use getline(), it will eat new line ...



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