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28

fgets() As everyone else said, the canonical alternative to gets() is fgets() specifying stdin as the file stream. char buffer[BUFSIZ]; while (fgets(buffer, sizeof(buffer), stdin) != 0) { ...process line of data... } What no-one else yet mentioned is that gets() does not include the newline but fgets() does. So, you might need to use a wrapper ...


26

In order to use gets safely, you have to know exactly how many characters that you will be reading so you can make your buffer large enough. You will only know that if you know exactly what data you will be reading. Instead of using gets, you want to use fgets, which has the signature char* fgets(char *string, int length, FILE * stream). It was never ...


20

If you really want use it. Here is answer From: http://www.gamedev.net/community/forums/topic.asp?topic_id=523641 If you use a reasonably recent version of gcc, you can use: #pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "your option here" For example, if those headers produce a "floating point comparison is unsafe" error, you would use: #pragma GCC diagnostic ignored ...


15

The problem is you are getting a newline character on your input from the user. while they are entering "y" you are actually getting "y\n". You need to chomp the newline off using the "chomp" method on string to get it to work as you intend. something like: speak_or_no = gets speak_or_no.chomp! while speak_or_no == "y" #..... end


11

The prototype for gets() is: char* gets(char *s); Note that the function DOES NOT read just a single character and place it in s; it actually reads an entire string into s. However, since gets() does not provide a way of specifying the maximum number of characters to read, this can actually read more characters into s than there are bytes allocated for ...


11

Because gets doesn't do any kind of check while getting bytes from stdin and putting them somewhere. A simple example: char array1[] = "12345"; char array2[] = "67890"; gets(array1); Now, first of all you are allowed to input how many characters you want, gets won't care about it. Secondly the bytes over the size of the array in which you put them (in ...


9

fgets. To read from the stdin: char string[512]; fgets(string, sizeof(string), stdin); /* no buffer overflows here, you're safe! */


8

I would heed the warning and replace gets. This is clear enough for me: BUGS Never use gets(). Because it is impossible to tell without knowing the data in advance how many characters gets() will read, and because gets() will continue to store characters past the end of the buffer, it is extremely dangerous to use. It has been used ...


8

Ruby will automatically treat unparsed arguments as filenames, then open and read the files making the input available to ARGF ($<). By default, gets reads from ARGF. To bypass that: $stdin.gets


7

When you input an option with the scanf() call, you type 2 keys on your keyboard, for example, 3 and ENTER. The scanf() consumes the '3' but leaves the ENTER hanging in the input buffer. When, later, you do gets() that ENTER is still in the input buffer and that's what gets() gets. You have two options: clear the input buffer after each scanf() clear the ...


7

This happens because: ch=getchar(); read either y or n from the input and assigns to ch but there a newline in the input buffer which gets read by the gets in the next iteration. To fix that you need to consume the newline following the y/n the user enters. To do that you can add another call to getchar() as: ch=getchar(); // read user input getchar(); ...


6

Use fgets() instead of gets() char buffer[BUFSIZ]; /* gets(buffer); */ fgets(buffer,sizeof(buffer), stdin); The gets() function does not check the length of buffer and can write past the end and alter the stack. This is the "buffer overflow" you hear about.


6

Try: scanf("%d\n", &a); gets only reads the '\n' that scanf leaves in. Also, you should use fgets not gets: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/fgets/ to avoid possible buffer overflows. Edit: if the above doesn't work, try: ... scanf("%d", &a); getc(stdin); ...


6

No, you can't do that way. You could use only static buffer or use "cpp-way", which is: std::string str; std::getline(std::cin, str);


6

gets is deprecated because it's unsafe, as what you already quoted, it may cause buffer overflow. For replacement, C11 provides an alternative gets_s with a signature like this: char *gets_s(char *s, rsize_t n); Note that C11 still recommends fgets to replace gets. Whether putting gets in the standard is controversial in the first place, but the ...


6

No, arrays in C are not dynamic, what you see is undefined behavior because of buffer overflow. And this is the reason you should NOT use gets(), use fgets() instead, which would prevent buffer overflow like this.


5

The answer is simply that no-one has written the code in GCC to produce that warning. As you point out, a warning for the specific case of "%s" (with no field width) is quite appropriate. However, bear in mind that this is only the case for the case of scanf(), vscanf(), fscanf() and vfscanf(). This format specifier can be perfectly safe with sscanf() and ...


5

scanf doesn't consume the newline and is thus a natural enemy of fgets. Don't put them together without a good hack. Both of these options will work: // Option 1 - eat the newline scanf("%d", &a); getchar(); // reads the newline character // Option 2 - use fgets, then scan what was read char tmp[50]; fgets(tmp, 50, stdin); sscanf(tmp, "%d", &a); // ...


5

You can use select to see whether you can safely gets from the socket, see following implementation of a TCPServer using this technique. require 'socket' host, port = 'localhost', 7000 TCPServer.open(host, port) do |server| while client = server.accept readfds = true got = nil begin readfds, writefds, exceptfds = select([client], nil, ...


5

You shouldn't use the gets function at all, the manpage says to use fgets instead. GCC does not provide the functionality that GCC does to disable warnings using pragmas. You must use the various warning options as flags to the compiler instead.


5

You should not use gets since it has no way to stop a buffer overflow. If the user types in more data than can fit in your buffer, you will most likely end up with corruption or worse. In fact, ISO have actually taken the step of removing gets from the C standard (as of C11, though it was deprecated in C99) which, given how highly they rate backward ...


5

gets() is returning the newline caused by you pressing the enter key. Try name = gets().chomp to trim it off.


5

You should look at Ruby's Timeout. From the docs: require 'timeout' status = Timeout::timeout(5) { # Something that should be interrupted if it takes too much time... }


5

I think the gets includes the newline at the end of the input. try using gets.chomp instead irb(main):001:0> input = $stdin.gets hello => "hello\n" irb(main):002:0> input = $stdin.gets.chomp hello => "hello"


5

Yes, it was useful and "extremely vulnerable to buffer-overflow attacks" at the same time. It would have always been broken and have caused programs to crash and I don't see what could possibly be meant by an "environment which restricts what can appear on stdin". No, gets didn't cause programs to crash. It is primarily a security problem. You can read ...


5

It's because the scanf call at the end of the loop doesn't read the newline. Instead this newline is read by your gets call. A simple solution is to add a space to the end of the scanf format string, like so: scanf("%d ", &j); This will make scanf skip trailing whitespace in the input. Another solution is to put an extra fgets after the scanf, but ...


5

When you use gets, the input is going to be followed by a newline so you will need to strip the newline before printing it out. print "Enter your name:" name = gets.chomp puts "Hello #{name}. Pleased to meet you." That should solve your problem.


5

If you mean using gets safely, no, it's not possible. Advice: don't use gets, because without knowing the length first, it may cause buffer overflow. Use fgets instead, or use gets_s in C11. In fact, gets has been removed from stdio.h since C11. (In C99, it's deprecated)


5

Use fflush(stdin) before each input statement. This method will clear the input buffer. After the modification your code will be- #include "stdio.h" int main() { struct books { char name[100],author[100]; int year,copies; }book1,book2; printf("Enter details of first book\n"); gets(book1.name); fflush(stdin); ...



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