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23

From my knowledge, the most accurate method is by using QueryPerformanceFrequency: code: var Freq, StartCount, StopCount: Int64; TimingSeconds: real; begin QueryPerformanceFrequency(Freq); QueryPerformanceCounter(StartCount); // Execute process that you want to time: ... QueryPerformanceCounter(StopCount); TimingSeconds := (StopCount - ...


18

Try Eric Grange's Sampling Profiler.


12

From Delphi 6 upwards you can use the x86 Timestamp counter. This counts CPU cycles, on a 1 Ghz processor, each count takes one nanosecond. Can't get more accurate than that. function RDTSC: Int64; assembler; asm // RDTSC can be executed out of order, so the pipeline needs to be flushed // to prevent RDTSC from executing before your code is finished. ...


11

Declare a function pointer of that type, and then load the function at run time with LoadLibrary or GetModuleHandle and GetProcAddress. You can find several examples of the technique in the Delphi source code; look at TlHelp32.pas, which loads the ToolHelp library, which isn't available on older versions of Windows NT. interface function GetTickCount64: ...


10

Assuming this is the Windows GetTickCount call, that's entirely reasonable: The resolution of the GetTickCount function is limited to the resolution of the system timer, which is typically in the range of 10 milliseconds to 16 milliseconds. Note that it's only measuring milliseconds to start with - and you can do an awful lot in a millisecond ...


9

You didn't specify your Delphi version, but Delphi XE has a TStopWatch declared in unit Diagnostics. This will allow you to measure the runtime with reasonable precision. uses Diagnostics; var sw: TStopWatch; begin sw := TStopWatch.StartNew; <dosomething> Writeln(Format('runtime: %d ms', [sw.ElapsedMilliseconds])); end;


8

public void BootTime(){ SelectQuery query = new SelectQuery("SELECT LastBootUpTime FROM Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Primary='true'"); ManagementObjectSearcher searcher = new ManagementObjectSearcher(query); foreach (ManagementObject mo in searcher.Get()) { DateTime dtBootTime = ...


6

If you are looking for a Windows solution try QueryPerformanceCounter. Following code was posted there by BobJoy1. You will have to divide the difference between two calls by the CPU frequency like so: LARGE_INTEGER start; ::QueryPerformanceCounter(&start); // do something LARGE_INTEGER stop; ::QueryPerformanceCounter(&stop); LARGE_INTEGER ...


6

I ask because I am currently trying to optimize a few functions It is natural to think that measuring is how you find out what to optimize, but there's a better way. If something takes a large enough fraction of time (F) to be worth optimizing, then if you simply pause it at random, F is the probability you will catch it in the act. Do that several ...


6

Avoiding the wrapping problem is easy, provided that the time span you want to measure is no more than 24.8 days (anything longer can't be represented in a signed integer). In C#: int start = Environment.TickCount; DoLongRunningOperation(); int elapsedTime = Environment.TickCount - start; I am not very familiar with VB.NET, but as long as you use ...


5

If you go the QueryPerformanceCounter route you need to watch out for hardware dependent wierdness. Its been awhile so I don't know if this kinda stuff still happens. You might also want to take a look at this link since it has a nice sample app which compares QueryPerformanceCounter, GetTickCount and TimeGetTime


5

If you are referring to the Windows API call then read this. I would guess that you are trying to time a short interval so this paragraph is relevant. Are you timing something shorter than that interval? If so look into QueryPerformanceCounter instead perhaps. The resolution of the GetTickCount function is limited to the resolution of the system ...


5

You're correct that Environment.TickCount will overflow after approximately 25 days, because the return value is a 32-bit integer. But there's a better way than trying to compare the TickCount if you want to determine when the system was last started. What you're looking for is called the system up-time. There are a couple of different ways that you can ...


4

This line is undefined behavior: sum = sum++; You can't modify a variable more than once between sequence points. You should just write this instead to increment the sum variable: sum++;


4

Naively the answer is that you need a while loop: while GetTickCount() < StartTime+600000 then ; SecondRun(); Or perhaps more easily read, a repeat loop: repeat until GetTickCount() >= StartTime+600000; SecondRun(); But that's the wrong way to do it. You'll run the processor hot for 10 minutes, and achieve nothing. And I'm glossing over the ...


4

Run the checked build of Windows. It artificially sets the GetTickCount value to 1 hour before rollover at boot, so that the counter value rolls over in 1 hour instead of 49 days.


3

What's the "KeyHooks" thread? If it's expecting to be calling detoured APIs, you ought to detour before creating the thread. Is GetTickCount_orig getting set at all? GetTickCount is likely a very, very short API causing problems for Detours (just not enough bytes to do the hooking in). Your DetourRemove is removing for GetTickCount64, not GetTickCount. ...


2

Just use the stopwatch: Stopwatch stopWatch = new Stopwatch(); stopWatch.Start(); Thread.Sleep(10000); stopWatch.Stop(); // Get the elapsed time as a TimeSpan value. TimeSpan ts = stopWatch.Elapsed; It will return an int64 and not an int32. Plus it's easier to understand.


2

From MSDN The resolution of the GetTickCount function is limited to the resolution of the system timer, which is typically in the range of 10 milliseconds to 16 milliseconds. The resolution of the GetTickCount function is not affected by adjustments made by the GetSystemTimeAdjustment function. The elapsed time is stored as a DWORD ...


2

include widows.h file in header..


1

This is a system problem not c# or VB. To check how accurate is your system toy can use Stopwatch class and two properties IsHighResolution - The timer used by the Stopwatch class depends on the system hardware and operating system. IsHighResolution is true if the Stopwatch timer is based on a high-resolution performance counter. Otherwise, ...


1

Actually the table you quote is false for QueryPerformanceCounter. QPC (for short) is implemented in terms of 3 possible timing sources, which are 1: HPET, 2: PM ACPI timer, 3: RDTSC. the decision is made by heuristics depending on conditions, kernel boot options, bugs in bios and bugs in ACPI code provided by the chipset. All of these bugs are discovered on ...


1

Try using Environment::TickCount


1

Here's what i think happens. contents of in.txt 1 contents of out.txt 2 1 2 1 when you read your value from in into sum, sum = 1; sum++ happens, sum becomes 2. 2 goes into out.txt; then 1 goes into out.txt. then you print "idle time". and it goes round and round and round since sum is always initialized to 1. try commenting out ...


1

You time them when they are called at runtime, eg: int main(int argc, char** argv) { ... DWORD start = GetTickCount(); CallAFunction(); DWORD end = GetTickCount(); DWORD elapsed = (end >= start) ? (end - start) : ((MAXDWORD - start) + end); ... } A better way to measure code timings is to use a profiler instead of writing logic ...


1

Here are some procedures I made to handle checking the duration of a function. I stuck them in a unit I called uTesting and then just throw into the uses clause during my testing. Declaration Procedure TST_StartTiming(Index : Integer = 1); //Starts the timer by storing now in Time //Index is the index of the timer to use. 100 are available ...


1

use windows api: require 'Win32API' t = Win32API.new("kernel32", "GetTickCount", nil, 'L') t.call() or Time.now - t.call() / 1000.0 to get a time when machine was booted


1

Yes, it's possible with FFI for example. At first, you should install ffi gem: gem install ffi And then attach this function: require 'ffi' module Foo extend FFI::Library ffi_lib "kernel32.dll" ffi_convention :stdcall attach_function :get_tick_count, :GetTickCount, [ ], :int end puts Foo.get_tick_count #=> 107073812


1

Don't modify oldtick ! You have to save it just once, and then // accelerating time by factor of "factor" return oldtick + (realtick - oldtick) * factor; EDIT: Another possible problem is that GetTickCount (at least on my computer, XP 32bit) does not have the standard "hookable" preamle: 8B FF mov edi, edi 55 push ebp 8B EC mov ...



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