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7

brew install gcc Numpy install now works fine.


7

The implicit statement (including implicit none) applies to a scoping unit. Such a thing is defined as BLOCK construct, derived-type definition, interface body, program unit, or subprogram, excluding all nested scoping units in it Functions and subroutines contained within a module will be subject to an implicit none in the module. External ...


7

I simply had to reinstall gcc: brew uninstall gcc brew install gcc After that veclibfort installed perfectly. thanks to kmm for the answer. He posted as a comment, I'm posting as an answer that I can mark as accepted.


6

I am not a Fortran expert, but it seems that real (kind=16) :: ssum declares a quadruple precision (16 byte) floating point number, which is probably emulated in software on your hardware. Your C++ code uses a long double which corresponds to an extended precision (10 byte) floating point number, which can be done by your hardware (and is much faster). ...


5

Another option I often encounter is when the Fortran compiler used to build the MPI library is not compatible with your current Fortran compiler. Then the problem is the incompatibility of the .mod files. Gfortran is more susceptible to this, than say Intel Fortran, because it changes the module format more often.


5

The random number generator produces pseudo-random numbers. To get different numbers each run, you need to intialise the random seed at the start of your program. This picks a different starting position in the pseudo-random stream.


5

The Fortran numeric literals are single precision unless the d modifier used, while MATLAB uses double as default numeric literal type. So maybe you should rewrite your pcnt expression like: pcnt = 0.9999d+0 * (-0.5d+0 + z2) Conversely, you should convert to single the numeric literals of MATLAB, in order to emulate the Fortran behaviour: pcnt = ...


5

The error you are showing us is likely related to how you are calling factorial() and not in this code. If I wrap your code in the following example: program test implicit none integer :: i do i=1,10 write (*,'(i2,"! = ",i8)') i, factorial(i) end do contains [cut and paste the code from your question] end program and compile with gfortran ...


4

That is not a valid way of delineating comments for standard Fortran. I suspect the code expects to be preprocessed by a C preprocessor, many of which would replace comments like that with white space. Try running gfortran with the -cpp option.


4

I'm in a good mood, so I'll try to answer this question, which is basic knowledge which can be easily googled (as already pointed out in the comments to this and your former question). Luckily, Fortran provides some really interesting intrinsics to get some understanding of floating point numbers. The 8 digits, you are talking about, are a rule of thumb ...


4

No, Yes (sort of) and No. Once per program unit (which is not the same thing as once per program) and in each interface body is enough. A program unit is either a main program, a module, an external subprogram (a function or a subroutine subprogram that does not appear after the CONTAINS statement of another type of program unit), a block data program ...


4

The second case indeed doesn't have a allocatable. It is, however, an automatic object. Ignoring the practical differences in memory use at the implementation level, there is a big difference. Yes, each a is (assuming things not explicitly stated in the question) a local variable which is, after the allocate and the automatic creation, of size n, but in ...


4

Here is an informal answer based on what works for me. My Fortran code is in two types of files -- those containing a main program and those containing a single module. In each kind of file, IMPLICIT NONE appears just after the "program foo" or "module foo" statements and after the USE statements at the top. It does not appear within subroutines or ...


4

As mentioned in the a comment, you want to use the iso_c_binding intrinsic Fortran module to provide C interoperability features. The following code/example is produced with GCC 4.9.2 on x86_64-pc-linux-gnu. Scalar data Consider the following Fortran: module data use iso_c_binding implicit none real(kind=c_double), bind(C) :: val end module ...


4

There are two questions here: In some situations, can I get better performance using a subroutine approach over a function approach? Why, if performance is worse, would I want to use a function? An important thing to say about the first question is, you may be best testing things for yourself: there are a lot of specific aspects to this. However, I have ...


4

One way is to pass an assumed shape array real(real64),intent(inout) :: flx_est(:),flx_err(:) the other is to exchange the dimensions of your array, so that you can pass a contiguous section of the 2D array. call combflx_calc(flx_est(:,i),flx_err(:,i)) The problem is that the explicit size dummy arguments of your procedure (var(n)) require contiguous ...


4

Your array temporary is being created because you are passing a strided array to your subroutine. Fortran arrays are column major so the leftmost index varies fastest in an array, or better said, the leftmost index is contiguous in memory and each variable to the right is strided over those to the left. When you call call ...


4

Elaborating on High Performance Mark's comment I don't know but I suspect that it may be down to Fortran's argument keyword capabilities, which mean that you can call your function like this fun_1d(data=the_data,this=that), that is you can name the arguments in the call rather than rely on position matching. consider the following type, ...


4

When the compiler says Error: size of 'put' argument of 'random_seed' intrinsic too small <4/12> it means that the size of your variable seed is too small. In this case you have seed of size 4 (and I guess the compiler must be expecting (at least) 12). The size of the array must be of a certain size which depends on the compiler. You can ...


4

From the ifort documentation there are the options -d-lines and -nod-lines: This option compiles debug statements. It specifies that lines in fixed-format files that contain a D in column 1 (debug statements) should be treated as source code. So, if the code is compiled without -d-lines (or with -nod-lines which is the default) then those lines with d ...


3

I have found a solution using recursive functions that is at least Standard conforming. It is neither elegant nor fast, and is limited be the stack depth, but it is working. I'll post it as an answer, although I hope some-one has a better solution... module list implicit none ! Node type n_list integer :: val ...


3

If you write to unit 8 before opening the file, you are in fact writing to a file called fort.8, see here. Apparently, this file is still open at unit 8 when you try to attach the scratch file to it. You can solve this by opening the scratch file before writing to the unit: PROGRAM testopenfile IMPLICIT NONE OPEN(8,STATUS='SCRATCH') ...


3

Well, the index slice should read y(:,ind). Also, if statements require a scalar logical, so you could use either all or any, depending on what you are trying to achieve: if( all( y(:,ind) == 0 ) ) then or if( any( y(:,ind) == 0 ) ) then


3

If you want to define constant in C, you can use #define PI 3.1415926. If you don't want to duplicate this everywhere, then you can use #includes like this: First a header (in a file named MyConsts.h): /* My constants */ #define PI 3.1415926 then a module (in some .c file): /* A module */ #include "MyConsts.h" // include here the contents of the file ...


3

No there is not any performance penalty, it is just a syntactic issue, the generated code is identical. It is really just an "alias". There should not be any differences even with optimizations disabled. My test confirms that. If it is not the case for you, you should show the differences you get from your compiler.


3

= is not an operator, it is an assignment in Fortran and they are very different beasts. To the classical possibility found in Fortran 90 and explained well in other answers, Fortran 2003 added a better possibility to bind the overloaded operators and assignments with the derived type. This way you are sure you will not import the type without the ...


3

You are correct that m31tensorprod being an internal function means that you do not have to declare it in the main program. In the jargon: it has an explicit interface. However, that is not the problem with your code. What is going wrong is with the function definition itself. [Admittedly the compiler message isn't too helpful.] The definition of the ...


3

You don't have c sources so the _C suffix on variables is inaccurate (harmless but confusing). The real issue is with this OBJS_C = $(SRCS_C:.c=.o) substitution ref. That's expecting to change .c files into .o files but you don't have any .c files. Change that to OBJS_C = $(SRCS_C:.f90=.o) and it should work for you.


3

The problem you're facing is that with ROOT_DIR = "C:\Users\Charlie\" OBJ_DIR = $(ROOT_DIR)\obj the rule $(OBJ_DIR)/%.o: %.f90 expands to "C:\Users\Charlie\"obj/%.o: %.f90 which is parsed as the static pattern rule "C: \Users\Charlie\"obj/%.o: %.f90 That is to say, with target "C, target pattern \Users\Charlie\"obj/%.o and prerequisite pattern ...


3

Well, it's not ifort... You are using a relatively knew feature (2003, I think) to allocate the Left-Hand-Side by assigning an array to an allocatable: a = [.true., .true.] b = [.false., .true.] For an intrinsic assignment, this is deactivated by default for ifort. Using -assume realloc-lhs during compilation, this feature can be activated, and your code ...



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