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17

This is not really an answer. Using https://hackage.haskell.org/package/ghc-typelits-natnormalise-0.2 , this {-# LANGUAGE GADTs #-} {-# LANGUAGE TypeOperators #-} {-# LANGUAGE DataKinds #-} {-# LANGUAGE KindSignatures #-} {-# OPTIONS_GHC -fplugin GHC.TypeLits.Normalise #-} import GHC.TypeLits data List (n :: Nat) a where Nil :: List 0 a (:>) :: a ...


14

(With the help from carter in #ghc on freenode) There is no switch to completely disable GC. Instead, use all of the following +RTS runtime options: Disable idle time garbage collection using -I0. Set the "nursery" == "allocation area" size to something very large, e.g. -A100G, as GC will only be done when the allocation area is full. See ...


10

The type of flip is flip :: (x -> y -> z) -> (y -> x -> z) To type check liftPoly, we have to instantiate the variable y at the polymorphic type forall a. k a -> b. This is an instance of impredicative polymorphism. As the page at https://ghc.haskell.org/trac/ghc/wiki/ImpredicativePolymorphism says, We've made various attempts to ...


9

If your main function is not an IO action, then all it can do is produce a result. Since Haskell is lazy, this (usually) means that it just produces a promise that the computation will be performed, but it won't compute it until it needs to be used. Since the usual way to ensure something is computed is to print that value out, or send it over a network, ...


9

Let's begin by reviewing how Dict and (:-) are meant to be used. ordToEq :: Dict (Ord a) -> Dict (Eq a) ordToEq Dict = Dict Pattern matching on a value Dict of type Dict (Ord a) brings the constraint Ord a into scope, from which Eq a can be deduced (because Eq is a superclass of Ord), so Dict :: Dict (Eq a) is well-typed. ordEntailsEq :: Ord a :- Eq a ...


9

There isn't currently a way to do this as a type synonym. However, if you have GHC 7.10, you can turn on the PartialTypeSignatures extension and write Foo _ a b instead. Use -fno-warn-partial-type-signatures to ask GHC not to warn you about each of the holes you leave in this way.


9

The type equality constraint ~ can only be written out if you have either TypeFamilies or GADTs enabled. However, enabling TypeFamilies or GADTs also enables MonoLocalBinds. As the name says, it disables generalization of locally defined variables. If MonoLocalBinds prevents code from compiling, you should either write out the generalized type signatures ...


8

You need to finish the implementation of Num MathExpress: instance Num MathExpress where fromInteger n = MathDouble (fromInteger n) ... The fromInteger methods is what allows numeric literals to be polymorphic, so 1 can be interpreted as Int, Integer, Double, Complex, or in this case MathExpress. If you want to have a number like 2.0 or 42.7 be ...


7

No, this wouldn't work. Rewrite rules are only applied if the types check. In this case the rule would only fire if you ran castVar :: Term c Void -> Term c Void, which isn't very helpful. (See https://downloads.haskell.org/~ghc/7.10.1/docs/html/users_guide/rewrite-rules.html for more info on rewrite rules) What you want is to coerce the type. It's safe ...


6

Perhaps you should set the encoding of the handle you're actually writing to. I don't know for sure, since I can't reproduce your problem, but something like this may do: withFile "asd.txt" WriteMode $ \h -> do hSetEncoding h utf8 hPutStr h "ćlččć"


6

Type level number literals don't yet have a structure on which we can do induction, and the built-in constraint solver can only figure out the simplest cases. Currently it's better to stick with Peano naturals. However, we can still use the literals as syntactic sugar. {-# LANGUAGE UndecidableInstances, DataKinds, TypeOperators, TypeFamilies #-} ...


6

Here are some steps you can perform to make it working. Download from http://hackage.haskell.org/package/regex-compat-0.92, unzip to <Haskell Platform INSTALL FOLDER>\2014.2.0.0\lib\ Run Haskell. Type :mod +Text.Regex to load the package. Type, e.g. subRegex (mkRegex "[0-9]+") "foobar567" "123" Result is "foobar123" (after all packages are loaded). ...


6

This can't really be done reliably with type synonyms. You need either existential types or rank-n types. The problem is that Haskell allows type synonyms to be fully intersubstitutable. I.e., when you define type Baz a b = Foo p a b, then in every context where you have Foo p a b, you would be allowed to use Baz a b, and vice-versa. So for example, if ...


6

This can be indeed done with type classes. Some preliminaries: {-# LANGUAGE UndecidableInstances, MultiParamTypeClasses, TypeFamilies, ScopedTypeVariables, FunctionalDependencies, TypeOperators, DataKinds, FlexibleInstances #-} import qualified Data.Vector as V import GHC.TypeLits import Data.Proxy newtype NVec (shape :: [Nat]) a = NVec {_data :: ...


6

To my knowledge, there is no definition of Constraint in any Haskell source file. It's a built-in, wired-in name that is defined to belong within GHC.Prim in the GHC sources itself. So in particular Constraint is not a promoted datatype, there's no corresponding datatype of kind * that is called Constraint. There are other kinds in GHC that are treated ...


6

The reason those return False is probably laziness. In GHC, m and n will refer to different thunks, since they are not evaluated yet. makeStableName does not force the value. If you manually force the thunk, they will be the same: let m = Wrapper myFunc a <- makeStableName $! getWrapper m b <- makeStableName $! getWrapper m print (a ...


5

You can stick an unsafeCoerce in front of every subterm (or, if you're feeling ambitious, only the ones that actually need it). In the comments, you ask how to annotate this term to make it type-check: div = (\ v0 -> (\ v1 -> (\ v2 -> (\ v3 -> ((v1 (\ v4 -> (v4 v3))) ((v0 (((v1 (\ v4 -> (\ v5 -> (\ v6 -> (v4 (\ v7 -> ((v5 v7) ...


5

It just picks one. This isn't the correct choice; it's a pretty well-known wart. You can cause crashes this way, so it's a pretty bad state of affairs. Here is a short example using nothing but GADTs that demonstrates that it is possible to have two different instances in scope at once: -- file Class.hs {-# LANGUAGE GADTs #-} module Class where data Dict a ...


5

I don't see any published version of syntactic whose signature for sugarSym uses those exact type names, so I'll be using the development branch at commit 8cfd02^, the last version which still used those names. So, why does GHC complain about the fi in your type signature but not the one for sugarSym? The documentation you have linked to explains that a ...


5

Let's compare actual numbers. Your version of kolakoski uses about 70k if run without optimization: $ ghc --make Kolakoski-Unit && ./Kolakoski-Unit +RTS -s 2 288,002,359,096 bytes allocated in the heap 1,343,933,816 bytes copied during GC 67,576 bytes maximum residency (422 sample(s)) 52,128 bytes maximum slop 2 MB ...


4

Put simply, running a program is a side-effect. This is why the top-level function is an I/O action. An ideal Haskell program is a large chunk of pure code with a thin I/O "skin" around it.


4

Here's a test: {-# LANGUAGE FlexibleInstances, OverlappingInstances, IncoherentInstances #-} import Data.Constraint class C a where foo :: a -> String instance C [a] where foo _ = "[a]" instance C [()] where foo _ = "[()]" aDict :: Dict (C [a]) aDict = Dict bDict :: Dict (C [()]) bDict = Dict bar1 :: String bar1 = case (bDict, aDict :: Dict (C ...


4

It's not a bug, it's a consequence of using YAML files for config: YAML parses 7.10 as the number 7.1. The node.js docs on Travis do have all the version numbers in quotes: language: node_js node_js: - "0.12" - "0.11" - "0.10" - "0.8" - "0.6" - "iojs" - "iojs-v1.0.4"


4

GHC just picks one, and this is the correct choice. Any two dictionaries for the same constraint are supposed to be equal. OverlappingInstances and IncoherentInstances are basically equivalent in destructive power; they both lose instance coherence by design (any two equal constraints in your program being satisfied by the same dictionary). ...


4

You shouldn't import Text.Regex.Posix, but rather just Text.Regex, because the two functions you want are there. Have a look at the Hackage page - you were almost there, but the functions where actually in that file.


3

The type of minimum is not the same as before. The old type was Ord a => [a] -> a. The new type is (Ord a, Foldable t) => t a -> a. It's not obvious anymore that there is an IsList instance for the list literal that is the argument to minimum. You can fix the problem here by adding a local annotation: {-# LANGUAGE ScopedTypeVariables #-} ...


3

For what it's worth, here's how I mentally process the error. I start from c -> c vs Float, and realize there's a problem with the number of arguments somewhere: some non-function is being applied, or a function is being passed too many arguments (which is the same thing, because of currying). Then I consider where the error point to: estimate x. I ...


3

For a problem like this, you could easily use the ScopedTypeVariables extension and change score's type signature to begin with forall c. Cell c => ..., but I would prefer extracting those functions out to the top level instead. In order to do this you'll need to add estimate as an argument to both scoreRed and scoreBlue: score :: Cell c => (c -> ...


3

You can't implement xor for modular numbers just by xorring the underlying bits; you'll get out-of-range numbers. For example: ghci> 9 `xor` 4 :: Integer 13 This is what the derived instance would do, which means it wouldn't work anyway. This sort of thing is why the constructor for Mod is hidden: so that the "is less than n" invariant can be ...


2

I think it's pretty straightforward - ultimately, you need every program to do IO at the top level - otherwise how would you know if it did anything at all, or - how useful would it be? So you must have either console I/O, network I/O, disk I/O, or something similar. I don't see how you could get around that.



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