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82

The command: git config --global alias.co checkout will create a git alias to do that. It will add the following entry into your global ~/.gitconfig file: [alias] co = checkout


43

If you consider the Git Faq section "Git Aliases with argument", you could do it, but by calling git through a shell: [alias] rb = "!sh -c \"git rebase -i HEAD~$1\" -" I haven't tested it yet, but if you can pass an argument, that would be the way to do it. A similar solution would be to use a shell function: [alias] rb = "!f() { git ...


15

The ! means "run the following as commands to the shell", so in this case the alias git commitx expands to the equivalent of running git add . && git commit (which is a terrible terrible idea)


14

You can make this work just fine. You just need to add a missing '-' at the end of your definition. The '-' will signal to bash that all option processing is done, and anything that comes after becomes a parameter you can reference via $1, $2, etc: [alias] nuke = !sh -c 'git branch -D $1 && git push origin :$1' -


12

You can use aliases to shorten the command. Use it like this: git config --global alias.fpush "push --force origin" Now to push your branch just type: git fpush feature-mongodb-support Or you can even hardcode the branch name into the command: git alias fpush "push --force origin feature-mongodb-support" and use only git fpush to push your precious ...


11

An important aspect of ! not covered by the accepted answer is that for the shell command, the working directory is set to the top level of the working copy. Therefore, git commitx would stage then commit all new and changed files in the working copy, while running git add . && git commit manually would stage then commit all new and changed files in ...


8

Have you checked the exit code from stash pop? && implies that the subsequent list is only executed if the exitcode is 0 (success). You can simply ignore the exitcode by using ; instead of &&. Verify the success by using stuff like: true && echo ok || echo fail # echoes "ok" false && echo ok || echo fail # echoes ...


6

Also, can edit this into your git config: [alias] co = checkout


4

Perhaps you want git merge $1 --no-commit


4

it is recommended that I perform a pull before attempting to push Then it is recommended wrong. Just push. The act of pushing asks whether it is possible to push. If there's a reason why you can't push, you won't be able to push. Then you can worry about what to do.


4

It should be: unset tmp_branch If you try unset $tmp_branch, the shell will substitute the value of $tmp_branch, trying to unset bug/graphs.


3

There is nothing that does exactly what you and I think it would also encourage bad work-flow habits, because you end up pushing code that is not tested. Just because something merges cleanly, it still could be horribly broken. git push is already going to reject if you are not up-to-date with the remote. I will usually fetch the changes, review them, ...


3

After reading these answers and reading this answer to a related question (http://stackoverflow.com/a/18782415/586), I created this alias to force push to origin based on the current branch name: fp = "!git push -f origin \"$(git rev-parse --abbrev-ref HEAD)\""


3

As per this question, git-config doesn’t support expansion of variables. What you can do, however, is define an alias with the common parts: lg = log --graph --pretty=format:'%C(cyan)%h%Creset -%C(yellow)%d%Creset %s %Cgreen(%cr) %C(red)<%an>%Creset' --abbrev-commit --date=relative Then define further aliases as shell commands that use the common ...


3

Bad idea. git add or even better git add -p is a great opportunity to review what you did once again before committing. Anyway, to execute your git alias in a shell you need to use this syntax: c = !git add -A && git commit -m Or you could just use git commit -a which seems to be what you want. This will not automatically commit new files but do ...


3

Short answer is you need to add a !git, in front of the diff, to tell git it is a shell command. So this: git config --global alias.diffsvn '!git diff `git log --grep git-svn-id | grep commit | sed "s/commit //g" | head -1` HEAD' I suggest this instead: git config --global alias.diffsvn '!git diff `git log --grep git-svn-id -1 | sed -n "s/commit //p"` ...


3

Rebasing all commits since branching If you just want to rebase all the commits that are new in your branch, since the time you branched from the parent branch, it would be easier to just have the following alias in your config: rbi = !sh -c \"git rebase -i `git merge-base $1 HEAD`\" - Then, if you wanted to rebase all the commits you've added to your ...


2

You can define an alias like this: [alias] chepull = !git checkout $1 && git pull origin You can do: git chepull branch_name Note: $1 is intentionally not specified in git pull origin, but should work as intended.


2

This should do the trick: git alias fpush "push --force origin" Which will let you use git fpush as a shorter alternative.


2

I had some fun trying to get this to work, here's what I came up with I don't have gitk or git gui in my environment to test your actual command, but from my experiments I would suggest you try: gg = !sh -c ": ; (gitk --all &) ; (git gui &)" Here's one I did get working on my box with some explanation... gg = !sh -c ": ; (qgit &) ; echo b ; ...


2

I think the expansion isn't what you expect. Let's start with your alias: eo = !echo $1 I believe git eo test is being expanded to: echo $1 test Which is then expanded to: echo test test The typical way git looks at the alias is to say when I say "eo", I want you to run "echo $1" and pass all arguments to that command. That allows you to do things ...


2

No need to detect the top-level. You can type in any subfolder: git add -u :/ This is short for: git add -u :(top) See git glossary: A pathspec that begins with a colon : has special meaning. In the short form, the leading colon : is followed by zero or more "magic signature" letters (which optionally is terminated by another colon :), and the ...


2

Sure, just run git help <command name>. If the command exists, that will bring up the man page for the command in question If the command is an existing alias, you'll get something along the lines of 'git l' is aliased to 'log' If the command does not exist, you'll get an error message


2

From the documentation: If the alias expansion is prefixed with an exclamation point, it will be treated as a shell command. So you can use: git config --global alias.testcommit '!git commit -m "$(date --utc)"' Note that you have to put git in there, since you're now specifying the whole shell command. ($() instead of backticks is unrelated, but ...


2

If your sh is bash, then the Bash man page has some info: -c string If the -c option is present, then commands are read from string. If there are arguments after the string, they are assigned to the positional parameters, starting with $0. Before you get a chance to access $@, Bash interprets the -c and will pass the subsequent arguments through ...


1

As VonC said first I need to do is to find parent of the current branch. The following script mostly does what I need: git branch | grep -v '*'|xargs -I{} sh -c ' printf "{}:"; git log --oneline `git merge-base "$(git rev-parse --abbrev-ref HEAD)" "{}"` | wc -l' | sort -t: -k +2n | tail -n 1 | sed 's/:.*//' What it does: For each branch finds ...


1

You're probably better off writing a bash script for something like this. Something like: #!/bin/bash if [[ $# == 0]] then echo 'No branch name' exit 1 fi git checkout "$*" git status Then whatever you save that file as will be the commands name, and then the first command would be the name of the branch.


1

To run multiple Git commands in an alias you'll need to modify your alias to use !, which runs a shell command, e.g.: [alias] co = "!git checkout \"$@\" && git status" The $@ should propagate any arguments to git co through to git checkout.


1

Such an alias would involve first finding the "parent" branch. It isn't trivial, and the question "Find the parent branch of a branch" has some good solutions. Git’s history is based on a DAG of commits. Branches (and “refs” in general) are just transient labels that point to specific commits in the continually growing commit DAG. As such, the ...


1

It's a quoting issue. I have not seen anything that properly describes how quoting works in git aliases, but this works: gl = "!f() { git log --all --pretty=format:'%h %cd %s (%an)' --since=\"$1\"; }; f" That is, use backslash-double-quote to get the double quotes to go through to the shell alias, so that $1 is expanded. Note that you must invoke it as: ...



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