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4

Easiest way would be to make a hard reset to a pre-merge commit, then merge again. To preserve work already done on conflict resolving, I'd recommend manually backing up the entire project as-is and using it to help with conflict resolution.


4

You want the --all option to git-merge-base. From the documentation: -a, --all Output all merge bases for the commits, instead of just one. This will show all the merge bases that will be used to create a temporary tree as a recursive merge base. For example, consider some branches 'A' and 'B' that were criss-cross merged: 3a4f5a6 -- 973b703 ...


3

First, let's assume for now that the "bad" merges we are looking for have only 2 parents (octopus merges can have > 2 parents). If a merge commit clobbers the changes of one of the branches, then we know that the head of the branch which has kept its changes will be in exactly the same state as the merge commit, since no other changes were added in the ...


2

git cherry-pick is the simplest. you can git cherry-pick any commit you want into the current HEAD. you can also try git cherry-pick A..B to cherry pick all the commits from A's child to B. git rebase is also powerful enough to do the job, but it's a bit tricky and confusing.


1

Push does not merge This is very long, so I have broken it up a bit. If you like, jump to the bottom, where "push does not merge" is repeated. You are proceeding from several faulty assumptions (not your fault, really, as Git documentation is ... let's just say "not so great" :-) ). To understand merge, you need to understand the concept of a merge ...


1

I think it's because the source line(s) that is(are) causing the conflict with your feature branch is still present in each of the master branches. For example, let's say each master branch has a commit, past the point at which the feature branches were branched, which does the following: a = 1; Now, on feature-staten-island, there's a commit which does ...


1

When you resolved the conflict between master-beta and feature-staten-island, you probably chose to keep the code on feature-staten-island. That means master-beta and master-alpha were no longer identical. You had to resolve the same merge conflict because the conflicting code still existed between master-alpha and feature-staten-island. Git will flag a ...


1

First, try those same config command form a regular cmd session (as I mentioned in "escape double quotes in git config from cmd"). Just make sure you have unzipped the latest git-for-windows (PortableGit-2.8.3-64-bit.7z.exe) in, for instance, C:\git, and added C:\git\bin to your %PATH%. Second make sure you have files that need merging, ie. that have ...


1

I think you just have to apply git merge. Before that, 1) Commit and push all the changes of the branch to the remote. Lets say if your branch name is partner and assuming you are working on mac, these are the below terminal commands to commit your parner's stuff. git commit -m "Changed something and added something" git push origin partner Remote is ...


1

You have three ways: using the merge command with the --no-commit flag, a selective rebase or using cherry-pick. Merging with --no-commit is probably the best for keeping the history around, but it will be more work since you will need to rollback changes manually before committing. Another option is to merge, then selectively revert changes using git ...


1

Merges definitely delete files when there's not a conflict with changes in branches. git does not preserve files during merging if they are deleted in the merging branch. - Nils_M To prove it to myself, I had to try to reproduce your scenario. See this demonstration in hopes that you can see what it is you are doing differently. create a new ...


1

git checkout -b release master git merge --no-commit -s ours tags/A tags/B git checkout tags/A -- . git checkout tags/B -- . git commit # put the above sequence in the commit message if you have love in your heart The first command is "checkout the current master but as the new branch named release:". The second is "set up but do not commit a no-op ...


1

Checkout master then force push your local master branch to origin/master git checkout master git push origin master -f This will force the master branch on origin to point to the commit with the message "Made the crafting..." SourceTree intentionally makes it pretty hard to force push to prevent you from "deleting" commits.


1

Are you able to do this after the fact, now in CVS, to prepare your cvs repo for the cvs2git script? Step through all tags and add the missing files to the tag. cvs tag on its own, without -F will not move a tag. So you can re-apply tag/A, based on tag/B and it will only apply it to files that are not already tagged, which is exactly what you want. It might ...


1

[Moved back from the other question, now that this question is back :-) ... and I'll leave just a link there rather than deleting that answer entirely.] It's somewhat klunky, but you can run the git merge-file command after manually extracting the desired base, local, and other file-versions. This gives you the most control, and I think it might be nice if ...


1

It seems to me you simply want to abort the merge. The modern way to do this is: git merge --abort And the slightly older way: git reset --merge The old-school way would be (warning: will discard all your local changes): git reset --hard It's worth noticing that git merge --abort is only equivalent to git reset --merge given that MERGE_HEAD is ...



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