Hot answers tagged

21

Looks like you're looking for the --ext-diff option. Here's what git show docs say about it: --ext-diff Allow an external diff helper to be executed. If you set an external diff driver with gitattributes, you need to use this option with git-log and friends.


12

Yup. git log -L<start>,<end>:<file> For example, git log -L55,65:app.js will show a log for lines 55-65 in app.js. To view a single line, use the same value for both start and end git log -L55,55:app.js Also works with gitk gitk -L55,65:app.js


10

Linus Torvalds explains it best: Spreading the word about an upcoming 'git' UI change, since I'm largely to blame. This change hopefully makes people write merge messages to explain their merges, and maybe even decide not to merge at all when it's not necessary. I've been using that git feature for the last few weeks now, and it has ...


9

Let's say you want to nuke evilbranch. You say you want to delete all of a branch's history. This technically includes the initial commit, which is probably more commits then you want. So first, identify which commit you consider to be the first commit of that branch. Let's say it's 666bad. Now we need to find all references to it. Run git branch -a ...


8

gitignore use of '*' follows the glob convention: Git treats the pattern as a shell glob suitable for consumption by fnmatch(3) with the FNM_PATHNAME flag: wildcards in the pattern will not match a / in the pathname. For example, "Documentation/*.html" matches "Documentation/git.html" but not "Documentation/ppc/ppc.html" or ...


8

The "detached HEAD" message is a warning, not an error. The reason for it is simple enough. Git has two states you can be in with respect to branches: on a branch, or not on a branch. When you are on a branch and make new commits, the branch automatically advances to include the new commits. When you are not on a branch and make new commits, the ...


7

Well, your branch is up to date with the last known position of origin/b535. If you want git status to give you more accurate info without having to do a git pull, do a git fetch instead. This will update origin/b535, without changing your local b535.


7

Short answer: git log --full-history -- your_file will show you all commits in your repo's history, including merge commits, that touched your_file. The last (top) one is the one that deleted the file. Some explanation: The --full-history flag here is important. Without it, Git performs "history simplification" when you ask it for the log of a file. The ...


6

Because not ignoring a file does not means "tracking everything": you can add and commit incrementally, in order to not "track automatically a thousand files, just because they are not ignored you can discover set of files that are not yet ignored but that you should (if they had been "automatically tracked", that would be to late: git rm first. Or worse, ...


6

Follow these steps: rake assets:clean git add . git commit -m commit_name git push heroku branch_name This will clean your assets locally + pushing on heroku would precompile the assets.


5

what's the advantage of being able to fetch without necessarily merging/rebasing? Well for one thing, what if you have nothing to merge or rebase yet? What if you want to check out somebody else's brand new branch that they've pushed to the remote? You're going to need to fetch in order to make your local Git aware of the new branch. Do frequent ...


5

Deleting a branch will only do that: Delete the branch. Since a branch is just a reference to a commit, only that reference is gone. The commit is still there. Similar to programming languages, Git has a garbage collection which will eventually remove commit objects which are no longer referenced. So if that branch was the only pointer to that commit, you ...


5

Use echo "$temp". The output from git branch includes an asterisk, which the shell expands to the directory listing. Quoting will prevent it from doing that.


5

You are correct: git does rename-detection, rather than rename-tracking, and if the file has changed "too much" (for some value of "too much"), git declares this to be a different file, rather than a renamed file. There is no perfect fix for this. Often the best option, if your git is new enough (1.7.4 or later), is to pass the -X ...


5

What are they? Those are conflict-markers, they begin with <<<<<<< and end with >>>>>>> Why did it happen? They can happen when you get conflicts while merging. E.g. merging two commits that change the same line (Git can't decide for you which version to follow) What can I do? You can resolve the conflict by ...


5

You need to pass the name_only keyword argument - it would automatically be used as --name-only command-line option when a git command would be issued. The following is the equivalent of git diff --name-only HEAD~1..HEAD: diff = repo.git.diff('HEAD~1..HEAD', name_only=True) print(diff)


5

After you copy it (the files) to a new location delete the .git Directory. It's hidden so make sure you can see hidden files and folders in folder options


5

Probably because it's just as quick to open .gitignore in a text editor or do $ echo <pattern> >> .gitignore.


5

I got a response for docker hub support that solved my issue: All newly created automated build repos referencing BitBucket source will be able to have dynamic build triggers based on Git tags. However, for existing automated build repos, created before 29th December 2015, there is a catch. In order for these existing repos to have tag-based ...


4

By default, GIT does merge during pulls. If yours is doing rebase, then it seems that at some point of time you had changed that behavior. Or someone helpful did that for you. Citing after this article (1) and this article (2) and this article (3) - which all describe how to do the opposite thing: (from 1) There is a configuration flag in GIT that, when ...


4

I can see why GitHub has chosen that approach, because the gh-pages for a particular repo are intrinsically linked to the codebase for the same repo. They probably have some technical reasons behind the scenes for doing so also. For example, would a separate gh-pages repo be billable against your plan's limit? It'd halve the number of repos you could have in ...


4

Git takes author's e-mail from several places and if it doesn't find it in any of these places it will create it on its own. See man git-config: user.email Your email address to be recorded in any newly created commits. Can be overridden by the GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL, GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL, and EMAIL environment variables. See git-commit-tree(1). ...


4

I use this command sequence: git checkout integration git merge featureOne git commit git push


4

#set the alias git config --global alias.cm "commit -m" Using it: git cm "message"


4

A SHA-1 hash is 160 bits long. That gives you 2160, or exactly 1,461,501,637,330,902,918,203,684,832,716,283,019,655,932,542,976 possible hashes. Assuming hash values are more or less unpredictable, the odds of two files having the same hash are infinitesimal to the point that it's just not worth worrying about it. Quoting from Scott Chacon's book "Pro ...


4

You should use a gerrit query to find all open changes by a known topic: ssh -p 29418 review.example.com gerrit query --format=JSON topic:MY-TOPIC status:open project:xxx Then you can iterate over each item in the returned JSON, fetch the changes and build them with your CI.


4

The command git pull is effectively an alias for git fetch and git merge. Whoever was instructing you probably did a poor job, because git pull right before you commit will indeed wipe out all your work. What they should have told you to do instead was commit, then git pull, or if you don't want a merge history use git pull --rebase instead. After that you ...


4

Never pull before you commit any valid changes. This will wipe off all your changes. To retain your code, you have to commit, then pull, then finally push. Follow these steps- Add your files to the commit- git add <filename> Commit those files with a commit message- git commit -m "added blah feature" Then, Pull(preferably rebase) to get the ...


4

is there a "normal" way to upload images to Github? The "normal" way to do it is to add the images to your local copy of the repository and then use git to commit your changes and push them to the remote repo, which is Github. So it's be something like: $ git add myImage.png $ git commit -m "Adding myImage.png" $ git push origin Is there a reason ...


4

Like @LucasTrzesniewski said, you can use --ext-diff from the command line to set a diff for the current session. You can also use the .gitattributes to set the git-diff perfile. A git diff implementation exists of 2 parts: A definition in $GIT_DIR/config or $HOME/.gitconfig A bound between a file and a definition in gitattributes Git has choosing for ...



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