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3

The -z option is useful here. It separates the files with a null byte rather than a space. If you have xargs, you could do something like this: git ls-files -o --exclude=standard -z | xargs -0 rm Alternatively, using a for loop in bash git ls-files -o --exclude=standard -z | read -r -d $'\0' -a files for i in "${files[@]}"; do rm "$i"; done This reads ...


0

The "Commented out" alias is now part of the ipython repo. From that point on the alias magic replaces "%%s" with "%s" and does not expect an argument.


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Rob would not only get the new code that he wanted, but also everything else from tims-branch because api-endpoint came out of that branch. Tim could try to fix this by doing an interactive rebase of api-endpoint that removed all of the commits that came from tims-branch after it diverged from develop. While in the api-endpoint branch git ...


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I was able to achieve a rather inelegent solution by: 1. Cloning the latest git source, to obtain and install a recent git-prompt.sh 2. Removing a check that would allow the script to color the branch (in __git_ps1) 3. Adding in another check to remove some control characters that weren't used (in __git_ps1_colorize_gitstring) 4. Altering my .bashrc to ...


0

From git help blame: -C|<num>| In addition to -M, detect lines moved or copied from other files that were modified in the same commit. This is useful when you reorganize your program and move code around across files. When this option is given twice, the command additionally looks for copies from other files in the commit that ...


0

Git doesn't track directories, it tracks only files. When you untrack all files from within a directory, you are in essence untracking the directory as well. If you want to keep the directory around in your repository on other machines, while ignoring all the files within it, you could add an empty dummy .gitkeep file. However, since the desired behavior ...


0

You need to use submodules, then initialize your submodules as part of the build process.


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I like the answer of @VonC. And the summary is: update your git! Git 2 has a couple of improved defaults (including this one; and e.g. push.default=simple).


0

Found answer here: http://eikke.com/importing-a-git-tree-into-a-subversion-repository/ This fails since the git svn command can’t figure out which commits to push: there’s no link between our original Git repository and the Subversion heads. To fix this, we can use a Git graft to link them. We’ll tell Git the commit which created the SVN folder in ...


0

Seems like you have multiple questions in one here, but I can pitch in and maybe point you in the right direction for part of it... Not having used openshift before, I don't have a solid grasp on the issues your running into, but look at the discussion here about running C5 in ephemeral environments. To give you a concrete answer to your question, if your ...


0

Let me understand your requirement here. You want to monitor the repository but not to pull anything, whenever somebody commits in to repo, you want to check the integrity of repo instead of cloning. I do not see any sense for above requirement, instead of jenkins you can have monitoring in place for same. Still you want to achive this. You can setup job ...


0

I found right clicking on Git Bash->Properties->tab Shrotcut-> edit-field "Start In" is set as %HOMEDRIVE%%HOMEPATH% or alternatively when Git Bash starts you can write pwd Then you can just add to that path file with magic name .bashrc Then you can put all the goodies you want there like: alias ll="ls -all" alias proj="cd /d/Data/vbe/ghd_josh"


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Solved, the problem is this http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/how-to-do-recursive-file-copy-of-directory-for-specific-files-199134/ cp evidently doesnt know how to do a recursion.


0

You may use GitHub Fork function: https://help.github.com/articles/fork-a-repo/ Basically, it duplicates the original repo on GitHub. You can clone, pull, modify, commit, push in this new repo whenever you like. If you even have to contribute into the original repo as well, you can create pull requests from your forked repo to the original one: ...


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You can use git-copy to duplicate the repo with all histories. git copy http://a.com/old.git http://a.com/new.git


0

You can achieve this with git-copy. git copy https://tfsfoo.com/_git https://tfsbar.com/_git


0

You can achieve this with git-copy. git copy /data/Dropbox/backup/that_stuff.git that_stuff.git


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You can achieve this with git-copy. git copy https://github.com/org1/repo.git https://github.com/org2/repo.git


0

You can also use git-copy with single command. git copy https://github.com/exampleuser/old-repository.git https://github.com/exampleuser/new-repository.git


1

Assuming you are on the first_puppet branch and origin points to the remote where you pushed to: git branch new_branch git reset --hard origin/first_puppet git checkout new_branch This creates a new branch from the current HEAD, then resets the current branch back to the same ref as you pushed upstream, then switches to the new branch. The new branch ...


0

I have the same problem and I think I tracked it down to the Eclipse-Groovy-Plugin (or the old Groovy-Version I have to use) causing this, at least in my case. What helped me was using the FileLeakDetector to get the stacktrace belonging to the file handle of the file that was locked. That should give you an idea of what process or plugin is causing this. ...


0

This has worked so far for me: git tag MYTAG ${PROMOTED_GIT_COMMIT} git push --tags I am not sure if I simplify the issue, in my environment the promotion seems to be executed on master where the archived artifacts are.


0

If your repository is under an organization on Github, you can add the developers to a read-access team. That way they can see and check out the repository but can't commit to it. They can also fork the repository, which lets them do their work in their fork then submit pull requests to get their work committed to the main repository. You can then grant ...


4

Git does not track directories; it will just implicitly create a directory when you create a file inside the directory. If you want to commit an empty directory, the convention is to create a file named .gitkeep inside it. Then just git add that file, git commit and git push as normal.


0

You can do that, but the pre-commit hook would perhaps be more appropriate than the commit-msg hook, because your test has nothing to do with the commit message, really. Inside your pre-commit hook, simply use a command substitution to capture the output of git config --get user.email which returns the author email address (edit: under the assumption ...


0

In Git, you always commit before you merge. The idea is to never have any modified files in the workspace when you merge. This is one of the main features over SVN: In Subversion, your uncommitted changes would be merged with work by someone else. The result of that is sometimes unpredictable. The most predictable thing is that it's always a lot of work to ...


0

If you don't have to worry about any other changes you made and you just want to go back to the last commit, then you can do: git reset . git checkout . git clean -f


0

How about using a git var command? For example: $ export EMAIL="arkadiusz@stackoverflow.com" $ git var GIT_AUTHOR_IDENT | grep -E -o "<.+>" | sed 's,<,,' | sed 's,>,,' arkadiusz@stackoverflow.com $ unset EMAIL $ git var GIT_AUTHOR_IDENT | grep -E -o "<.+>" | sed 's,<,,' | sed 's,>,,' ja@AMDC689 Modify ~/.gitconfig: [user] ...


0

Follow this link : I have created an step by step procedure to install Appium on linux http://install-appium-on-linux.blogspot.com/2015/01/install-ruby-sudo-apt-get-install-build.html


1

If you currently are on one branch with a commit with changes to the 50th line, and you have a parallel branch with a commit with changes to the 500th line, and you want to merge those 2 branches, you run git merge <parallel branch>. This effectively merges the parallel branch into your current branch. As the changes in the 2 commits are on separate ...


0

You have to create the gradle.properties file in the .gradle folder. The location of this folder can be configured by altering the environment variable GRADLE_USER_HOME. This will be where all external dependencies are cached locally, and where your builds will be stored when you run gradle install. Inside your file, you should have the following: ...


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Answer of Matthias Braun works for me. thanks!


0

The Atom Editor Git Integration page, in the "Commit Editor" section states that you must pass the --wait flag as part of the editor command: git config --global core.editor "atom --wait"


0

After writing my own answer I found 2 similar questions with good answers here and here. They provide python scripts for saving and restoring timestamps of files. Below is my solution. I decided to keep it because of it's simplicity - it is just bash one-liner. It is not complete workaround, as it is a way to change all unchanged files' timestamps to some ...


0

got it, my error is exactly what mu said: trying to add it as new repo with git init.. git clone myrepo.git cd work && mkdir subject && cp myfiles to subject && cp subject git add . && git commit -m "some message" git push - will push myfiles into myrepo.git under work/subject


0

git add . will also work fine, as long as you run it from your project's root directory. The steps you have followed above will work absolutely fine, though I would like to bring your attention to using a .gitignore, which is much recommended. Using the .gitignore file, you can tell git to explicitly not track the files which match the patterns file, so ...


0

Since you do not want to push those files to the remote server, but want to keep the copies locally, your best bet is to do git rm with a --cached flag. Basically, do this: git rm --cached some/filename.ext git rm --cached -r some/directory/ and then commit and push your changes back using git commit -m "removing redundant files" From the manpage for ...


2

You may change the $TMPDIR env variable : export TMPDIR=/your/tmp/folder/


0

I found the answer hidden at How do I merge a sub directory in git? The key bit of git magic is to use the following to sync up the two common subdirectories: git read-tree --prefix=MyHugeProprietaryWebApp/public_html/ -u contrib/master:MyOpenSubproject/public_html/ Where MyHugeProprietaryWebApp is the project's top-level directory below the repository ...


1

I've had the same problem in IntelliJ 14.1 from time to time. Turned out it was due to using non-ASCII characters (e.g. æ, ø or å) in the branch name I was working on. I renamed the branch, and IntelliJ was able to diff again.


0

I stumbled upon the same problem, coming from SVN I found this very weird as well. I do not have an answer to the why, but maybe this helps: I use another merge tool (depending on what OS you are working on), i use meld diff for solving merge conflicts (I work on linux / ubuntu). And you can set git to use this external merge application as well... see ...


0

A small tip is to also make sure you are running the git commands on the 'git' you think you are. For example you may have git installed on windows, and git installed on cygwin, so make sure you have set the right git config.


0

Pull the changes from remote, then do a git rm on your local repo, commit the changes, and again push to the remote. The files will be deleted. You can check this earlier question on SO how to delete files in the remote repository?


0

Rule of thumb is to exclude files what are generated automatically during project import / build / etc. If your team only writes new components, maybe better to create a template project only containing the configuration and what else necessary to start writing a component.


0

Git did not ask anything because you made the change on foo and you should be aware that this change will goes straight after the merge if nobody changed this file on the slave branch. Let's go trough this simple example: o-- slave / \ o--o--o master ^ origin You can reproduce it with this: git init dd if=/dev/urandom of=foo bs=100k count=1 dd ...


0

Your case seems to be ideal for git bisect. https://www.kernel.org/pub/software/scm/git/docs/git-bisect.html


2

For any uncommitted change at the svn working directory, you have two options: copy changed files over to a git working directory and treat as normal git change. create a new svn "wip" branch for every remaining change, commit changes from working directory there. Sync those changes into git. Checkout those wip branches at git working directories.


1

You did just the first step of the instructions. You must continue along the tutorial. Then you can check out and track the trunk using .. See ArcherBranchManagement for the available branches. https://sourceware.org/gdb/wiki/ArcherBranchManagement $ git clone --origin archer ssh://sourceware.org/git/archer.git $ cd archer $ git remote add gdb ...


0

Make sure remote url in your local repo is the same as Bitbucket shows for your repo on the site git remote -v On Bitbucket site: go to project page -> Actions -> Clone -> check url or just clone it from scratch


0

What you should do is clone using a ssh key. You can add a public ssh key in your user settings, in stash. Then, you can clone using the ssh:// URL that will show when you're trying you clone, and you won't have to type a password ever again. This is safer, and easier.



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