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22

You have created a GtkBuilder file instead of Glade file. You can use GtkBuilder as follow: builder = gtk.Builder() builder.add_from_string(string, len(string)) builder.connect_signals(anobject) builder.get_object(name) EDIT: When you start a new project in glade it asks you if you want create a glade file or a GtkBuilder file, which is new and more ...


19

Right-click on one of the tabs, and click "Insert tab before" or "Insert tab after".


18

I would say that it depends: if you find that using Glade you can build the apps you want or need to make than that's absolutely fine. If however you actually want to learn how GTK works or you have some non-standard UI requirements you will have to dig into GTK internals (which are not that complicated). Personally I'm usually about 5 minutes into a rich ...


17

To add a cell renderer to your tree view in Glade, right click on the tree view and select "Edit". This brings up the tree view editor. If you click on the "Hierarchy" tab then you can add or remove columns. Add a column and then right click on it for a menu of cell renderers that you can add. This should do the trick.


16

The problem was that gtk2hs does not support gtk3, and the file I was creating was for gtk3. Glade can generate either a libglade file or gtkbuilder file. Both are xml files, and the main difference between them is that the first starts with <glade-interface> and the later starts with <interface>. Also in gtkbuilder files the <object> tag ...


13

Well, the solution is pretty obvious, after calling to Gtk.Builder() one needs to convert the old glade interface with the gtk-builder-convert command to get the interface file in the right version. $ gtk-builder-convert myui.glade myui.ui And then, in the python script: from gi.repository import Gtk builder = Gtk.Builder() ...


12

Glade/Gtk+ for Windows is exactly like Glade but for Windows.


11

You need to use gtk.Builder instead. This class can load any number of UI files, so you need to add them manually, either as files or as strings: self.uifile = "sdm.ui" self.wTree = gtk.Builder() self.wTree.add_from_file(self.uifile) Instead of get_widget, just use get_object on the builder class: self.window = self.wTree.get_object("MainWindow") if ...


11

Use GtkBuilder instead of Glade, it's integrated into Gtk itself instead of a separate library. The main benefit of Glade is that it's much, much easier to create the interface. It's a bit more work to connect signal handlers, but I've never felt that matters much.


11

This is really the suggestion from augustss' comment. Thoroughly untested, but this will get you started: import Control.Applicative import Control.Monad import Control.Monad.Trans import Control.Monad.Trans.Reader import Graphics.UI.Gtk import Graphics.UI.Gtk.Glade getButton :: String -> ReaderT GladeXML IO Button getButton buttonName = do ...


10

is there a simple way of detecting something like GTK, so it only applied the code when GTK was present? First, break your app into 3 separate modules. The actual work: foo_core.py. A CLI module that imports foo_core. Call it foo_cli.py. A GUI module that imports foo_core. Call it foo_gui.pyw. The foo_cli module looks like this. import foo_core ...


10

Try with this code: #!/usr/bin/env python # -*- coding: utf-8 -*- import pygtk pygtk.require("2.0") import gtk import gtk.glade class HellowWorldGTK: def __init__(self): self.gladefile = "helloworld.glade" self.glade = gtk.Builder() self.glade.add_from_file(self.gladefile) self.glade.connect_signals(self) ...


9

You are doing one or more of the following three things wrong: When you compile a program using Gtk.Builder, you have to add --pkg gmodule-2.0 to your valac command line. (link) When you place your signal handlers inside a class and/or namespace, you have to add the class and/or namespace name to the handler name in Glade, so you should be connecting to ...


7

In my projects, I always have one window per glade file. I'd recommend the same for your project. The following are the two main reasons: It will be faster and use less memory, since each call to gtk.glade.XML() parses the whole thing. Sure you can pass in the root argument to avoid creating the widget tree for all windows, but you'd still have to parse ...


6

Basically, you have to use GtkTreeView and set its "model" property to a GtkListStore that contains your data. GtkTreeView manages selection with GtkTreeSelection class. Use gtk_tree_view_get_selection (or whatever it is mapped to in ruby-gtk) to get the GtkTreeSelection. And set the selection mode to "multiple". Here's an example in Python. In Ruby/Gtk it ...


6

You can use gtk_widget_set_sensitive(menuitem, true/false) to disable or enable the menu item widget. Alternatively, if you used GtkUiManager and GtkAction to build the menu, use gtk_action_set_sensitive() instead.


6

First of all libglade is an old library. If you are writing new project start with gtk builder. As you can see here gtkmm provide easy way to create your own widgets and see them (almost) in glade tool. You simply insert plain DrawinArea widget to window and then tell gtk-builder to put in this place yours derived class. Here is all together: Setting up ...


6

I wouldn't know about a way to do something like this by simple switching a settings, I guess you will need to handle this via signals, one way would be to connect to the changed signal and then filter out anything that's not a number. Simple approach(untested but should work): class NumberEntry(gtk.Entry): def __init__(self): ...


6

libglade has been replaced by GTK Builder which is basically a slight modification of libglade's API that's part of GTK+ proper. Here are some links which should help you with that: GTK+ and Glade3 GUI Programming Tutorial - Part 1 Libglade to GtkBuilder F.A.Q. learnpygtk.org - libglade vs gtkbuilder PyGTK Class Reference - gtk.Builder StackOverflow - ...


6

I finally found the answer for my own question. I used de Inno Setup utility (which you can find here: http://www.jrsoftware.org/isdl.php) to make a Windows installer. For a GTK / Glade / Gtk2hs application called Crosschecker I used this confiuration: ; -- crosschecker.iss -- ; For making the crosschecker installer. [Setup] AppName=Crosschecker ...


6

Using gtk.Builder.add_from_file adds the entire hierarchy from your file to the Builder object, which is why you're getting the signal connection warnings; the builder.connect_signals() call tries to connect up everything. Instead, use gtk.Builder.add_objects_from_file to choose the individual top-level window or widget that you want to handle in your ...


6

With a few changes, you can incorporate everything into your source code and thus into your executable file. If you run gdk-pixbuf-csource on your image files, you can convert them into strings, which you can then load using gtk.gdk.pixbuf_new_from_inline(). You can also include your Glade file as a string in the program and then load it using ...


6

I assume that you have a model that contains a column with some text and that a gtk.CellRendererText widget has a text property set to the column index in that model. If you add a new column to that model you can use it to set the font weight used in every cell renderer. To do that just set the gtk.CellRendererText widget weight property to the new column ...


6

In Gnome 3, status bars are no longer containers; they're more like stacks of messages. To display a message, get a fresh context id and push the message onto the stack of messages associated with the statusbar: context_id = statusbar.get_context_id("progress_message") statusbar.push(context_id, "Almost done...") or statusbar.push(1, "Almost done...") ...


6

From your description, I assume that you have a tree view, but haven't set it up properly. A GTK tree view is worth nothing if you don't connect it to several other widgets. A tree model, which holds the data to be displayed in the tree view. The tree model can either be a list store, which stores data as a list, or a tree store, which stores the data as a ...


5

Glade is very useful for creating interfaces, it means you can easily change the GUI without doing much coding. You'll find that if you want to do anything useful (e.g. build a treeview) you will have to get familiar with various parts of the GTK documentation - in practice finding a good tutorial/examples.


5

Besides the ones already mentioned I can add: Kiwi uxpython pygtk treethon I've never used any of them so have no recommendations but, for what it's worth, I have used at least 2 complex programs built directly on pygtk that worked in both Windows and Linux. I think Kiwi is the only one of these with baked in support for db (through interface with ...


5

This tutorial goes in details with examples in both C and Python: Designing a User Interface using Glade


5

Look into layout containers. In GTK+, layout is almost never hard coded. Unlike in the Windows API, in which you get the fixed size and location you ask for, GTK+ takes a different route. You ask for a size, but you aren't actually guaranteed to get it. This helps programs scale to different sized monitors and viewports. Because you don't have a fixed ...


5

Subclassing GtkWindow is more common in GTK's various language bindings than it is in plain C. You didn't mention which language you were using. That said, the way I subclass GtkWindow in C is to create the contents of the window in Glade, but not the window itself. In Glade 3 (IIRC) you can right-click on a widget in the palette and choose "Add widget as ...



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