Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

51

It is very possible to have multiple versions of glibc on the same system (we do that every day). However, you need to know that glibc consists of many pieces (200+ shared libraries) which all must match. One of the pieces is ld-linux.so.2, and it must match libc.so.6, or you'll see the errors you are seeing. The absolute path to ld-linux.so.2 is ...


43

When libstdc++ is built its configure script tests your system to see what features are supported, and based on the results it defines (or undefines) various macros in c++config.h In your case configure determined that the POSIX nanosleep() function is not available and the macro is not defined. However, as you say, nanosleep() is available on your system. ...


32

Yes, this is certainly possible. You will need to write an interface layer in C++ that declares functions with extern "C": extern "C" int foo(char *bar) { return realFoo(std::string(bar)); } Then, you will call foo() from your C module, which will pass the call on to the realFoo() function which is implemented in C++. If you need to expose a full C++ ...


28

If you compile your code with -nostdlib, you won't be able to call any C library functions (of course), but you also don't get the regular C bootstrap code. In particular, the real entry point of a program on linux is not main(), but rather a function called _start(). The standard libraries normally provide a version of this that runs some initialization ...


27

You are correct in that glibc uses symbol versioning. If you are curious, the symbol versioning implementation introduced in glibc 2.1 is described here and is an extension of Sun's symbol versioning scheme described here. One option is to statically link your binary. This is probably the easiest option. You could also build your binary in a chroot build ...


23

Building your shared library with -pie option appears to give you everything you want: /* pie.c */ #include <stdio.h> int foo() { printf("in %s %s:%d\n", __func__, __FILE__, __LINE__); return 42; } int main() { printf("in %s %s:%d\n", __func__, __FILE__, __LINE__); return foo(); } /* main.c */ #include <stdio.h> extern int ...


19

glibc is a core C runtime library. It provides things like printf(3) and fopen(3). glib is an object-based event loop and utility library written in C. gnulib is a library that provides an adapter from the POSIX API to the native API. All three are used for completely different tasks.


19

It's not your kernel version that's the problem. The loader on your system does not support the new Linux ABI. Until relatively recently, Linux ELF binaries used the System V ABI. Recently, in support of STT_GNU_IFUNC, the Linux ABI was added. You would have to update your system C library to have a loader that support STT_GNU_IFUNC, and then it will ...


19

I have found the answer to my question myself:) So what I didn't understand was how the glibc could differentiate between a Segfault and a corrupted double-linked list, because according to my understanding, from perspective of glibc they should look like the same thing. Because if I implement a double-linked list inside my program, how could the glibc ...


19

I was able to install libc6 2.17 in Debian Wheezy by editing the following above recommendations: IMPORTANT You need to exit out of your display manager by pressing CTRL-ALT-F1. Then you can stop x (slim) with sudo /etc/init.d/slim stop (replace slim with mdm or lightdm or whatever) Add the following line to the file /etc/apt/sources.list: deb ...


18

Use readelf -a and objdump -x to inspect ELF files in preference to strings. Actually, all the GLIBCXX_* versions don't apply to the entire library, but to each symbol (symbol versioning, see DSO-howto). So you can have e.g: std::char_traits<wchar_t>::eq@@GLIBCXX_3.4.5 and std::ios_base::Init::~Init()@@GLIBCXX_3.4 on the same library file. The fact ...


17

I'm going through this book too and ran into this problem. I googled it and ended up here following Employeed Russian's advice I went in and played with the configure files and got it to work. Go into your configure to about line 6404 and then paste this in: 2.15) { $as_echo "$as_me:${as_lineno-$LINENO}: result: 2.15 family" >&5 $as_echo ...


16

The problem is that you built your new GCC incorrectly: on Linux you should use ./configure --prefix=/usr The default installation prefix is /usr/local, which is why make install put gcc and g++ binaries into /usr/local/bin, etc. What's happening to you now is that you compile and link using the new (symlinked) GCC 4.2.4, but at runtime your program ...


16

Check the man page for malloc(3) for usage of the MALLOC_CHECK_ environment variable. Using this, you can turn off 'aborts' for those double free errors and whatnot to play with things. man malloc So if your program was called 'badfree', you can either set MALLOC_CHECK_ (note trailing underscore) with an export command, or just set it every execution of ...


15

Include features.h, it contains the macros you need, e.g. #define __GNU_LIBRARY__ 6 /* Major and minor version number of the GNU C library package. Use these macros to test for features in specific releases. */ #define __GLIBC__ 2 #define __GLIBC_MINOR__ 4


15

_GNU_SOURCE is the only one you should ever define yourself. __USE_GNU is defined internally through a mechanism in features.h (which is included by all other glibc headers) when _GNU_SOURCE is defined, and possibly under other conditions. Defining or undefining __USE_GNU yourself will badly break the glibc headers.


14

Unbuffered output is very slow. By default stdout is fully-buffered, however when attached to terminal, stdout is either unbuffered or line-buffered. Try to switch on buffering for stdout using setvbuf(), like this: char buffer[8192]; setvbuf(stdout, buffer, _IOFBF, sizeof(buffer));


14

The code provided by eerpini does not work as written. Note, for example, that the pipe ends that are closed in the parent are used afterwards. Look at close(wpipefd[1]); and the subsequent write to that closed descriptor. This is just transposition, but it shows this code has never been used. Below is a version that I have tested. Unfortunately, I ...


14

You did not mention what the command was that you were trying to run that produced the error message. However, the bottom line problem is that you are trying to run and/or install 32-bit (i686) packages on a 64-bit (x86_64) system which is not a good idea. For example, if you were trying to run the 32-bit version of Perl on a 64-bit system, the result would ...


14

In fact you cannot do it easily right now (at the time I am writing this message). I will try to explain why. First of all, the glibc is no more, it has been subsumed by the eglibc project. And, the Debian distribution switched to eglibc some time ago (see here and there and even on the glibc source package page). So, you should consider installing the ...


13

C++ FAQ Lite: "How to mix C and C++ code". Some gotchas are described in answers to these questions: [32.8] How can I pass an object of a C++ class to/from a C function? [32.9] Can my C function directly access data in an object of a C++ class?


13

Yes, to call a C function, you need to write a binding for it. The process is described in http://live.gnome.org/Vala/Tutorial#Binding_Libraries_with_VAPI_Files, however, this doesn't apply directly to custom functions or libraries written without GObject. You'll probably need help from #vala IRC channel if you have complex binding for non-GObject libraries. ...


13

http://blog.ksplice.com/2010/03/libc-free-world/ has a very good description of precisely controlling the gcc's programatic output. Edit: They (ksplice) just put out part 2 of the above tutorial/guide. See it here: http://blog.ksplice.com/2010/04/libc-free-world-2/ This mostly deals with linker settings to remove unnecessary fluff from files.


13

The following analysis applies only to glibc (based on ptmalloc2 algorithm). There are certain options that seem helpful to return the freed memory back to the system: mallopt() (defined in malloc.h) does provide an option to set the trim threshold value using one of the parameter option M_TRIM_THRESHOLD, this indicates the minimum amount of free memory ...


13

I think this is very annoying, and I think it is arrogant to call a feature "useless" because it has problems dealing with certain use cases. The biggest problem with the glibc approach is that it hard-codes paths to system libraries (gconv as well as nss), and thus it breaks when people try to run a static binary on a Linux distribution different from the ...


13

/usr/lib/libc.so is a linker script which tells the linker to pull in the shared library /lib/libc.so.6, and a non-shared portion, /usr/lib/libc_nonshared.a. __libc_csu_init and __libc_csu_fini come from /usr/lib/libc_nonshared.a. They're not being found because references to symbols in non-shared libraries need to appear before the archive that defines ...


12

I believe if you setenv MALLOC_CHECK_ to 2, glibc will call abort() when it detects the "free(): invalid pointer" error. Note the trailing underscore in the name of the environment variable. If MALLOC_CHECK_ is 1 glibc will print "free(): invalid pointer" (and similar printfs for other errors). If MALLOC_CHECK_ is 0, glibc will silently ignore such errors ...


12

The kinds of programmer you do not want to have the misfortune to work with, write comments like these: My personal strstr() implementation that beats most other algorithms. * Until someone tells me otherwise, I assume that this is the * fastest implementation of strstr() in C. * I deliberately chose not to comment it. You should have at ...


12

Rock solid for 4 days straight. I'm declaring victory on this one. The answer is "stupid user error" (see comments above). A mutex should only be unlocked by the thread that locked it. Thanks for bearing with me.


12

glibc is telling you you're passing in an address that couldn't have been returned from malloc/realloc. This is because you're passing in the address of the pointsAndName stack variable. You need to pass in the value, which is what you received from malloc. Also, whenever you call realloc, you should use a temporary variable. That way, if the realloc ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible