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2

You just need to set failglob: shopt -s failglob to avoid showing literal *.jar when none are matched in a given folder. PS: This will generate an error when it fails to match any *.jar as: -bash: no match: *.jar


2

You are right: the easiest way is to tell Mercurial to forget the files (by using hg forget). However Mercurial is not tracking directories, only files. You cannot add a directory and thus cannot forget it either. You probably have files under bin and res that have been added to the list of tracked files: those are the ones you need to forget.


2

You can start with a function like this for glob like behavior: function glob(pattern, input) { var re = new RegExp(pattern.replace(/([.?+^$[\]\\(){}|\/-])/g, "\\$1").replace(/\*/g, '.*')); return re.test(input); } Then call it as: glob('http://*.example.org/*', 'http://foo.example.org/bar/bla'); true


2

While the answer by @SpeakEasy can ignore .so files in a single step using *.so*, for your use case of ignoring files in formats specified, you can use two entries in your .gitignore for more specific ignore rule *.so *.so.[0-9]* From gitignore man page Each line in a gitignore file specifies a pattern. Git treats the pattern as a shell glob ...


1

Solved the problem by writing a lib for it: https://github.com/lnwdr/calmcard This matches arbitrary strings with simple wildcards.


1

A glob pattern will work and I'm using it successfully with a karma/travis/codeclimate set up. Using codeclimate < test/coverage/**/lcov.info should work assuming have the CODECLIMATE_REPO_TOKEN variable set. Also, options to change the subdirectory structure is being discussed on https://github.com/karma-runner/karma-coverage/pull/62.


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import os print len(os.listdir(os.getcwd()))


1

I doubt if a glob would do the intended. You could use brace expansion, however: echo {.,lib}/*.js


1

Explanation and background information The OP's problem was NOT with globbing per se - for a glob (pattern) to work, the special pattern characters such as * must be unquoted, which works even in strings that are partly single- or double-quoted, as the OP correctly did in his question: "$dir/"*.jar # OK, because `*` is unquoted Rather, the problem was ...


1

From your question: Q: "what is the difference between the glob and path modules?" A: "both have different functions" path is used to manipulate strings that are used in path-related functions. As such, it's not actually touching the file system (like fs does) but it's providing tools to make path manipulation easier. This saves us from writing the ...



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