Hot answers tagged

13

The glob module uses the fnmatch module for individual path elements. That means the path is split into the directory name and the filename, and if the directory name contains meta characters (contains any of the characters [, * or ?) then these are expanded recursively. If you have a list of strings that are simple filenames, then just using the ...


9

gitignore use of '*' follows the glob convention: Git treats the pattern as a shell glob suitable for consumption by fnmatch(3) with the FNM_PATHNAME flag: wildcards in the pattern will not match a / in the pathname. For example, "Documentation/*.html" matches "Documentation/git.html" but not "Documentation/ppc/ppc.html" or ...


7

Just use basename() combined with array_map() like this: $images = array_map("basename", $images);


7

I think choroba's comment is correct. Since it only happens when you install on windows rather than when you test on windows, I'll bet that it is a "C:\Program Files" space issue. It is listed in the docs for perl's File::Glob: Due to historical reasons, CORE::glob() will also split its argument on whitespace, treating it as multiple patterns, ...


7

compgen -G "<glob-pattern>" Escape the pattern or it'll get pre-expanded into matches. Exit status is 1 for no-match, 0 for 'one or more matches'. stdout is a list of file matching the glob. I think this is the best option in terms of conciseness and minimizing potential side effects.


6

If you set dot: true, it should work. Eg: gulp.task('something', function () { return gulp.src([ 'app/**/*' ]), { dot: true }).pipe(gulp.dest('dist')); }); Reference


6

You actually can do this, with an extglob. To demonstrate, copy-and-paste the following code: shopt -s extglob cd "$(mktemp -d "${TMPDIR:-/tmp}/test.XXXXXX")" || exit touch hello.txt hello.foo hello.foo.jpg hello.jpg printf '%q\n' !(*.foo).jpg Output should be: hello.jpg


6

COUNT=$(ls -1 ${DIRNAME} | wc -l) ...is a buggy way to count files in a directory: ls -1 tells ls not to put multiple files on a single line; making sure that wc -l will then, by counting lines, count files. Now, let's speak to "buggy": Filenames can contain literal newlines. How a version of ls handles this is implementation-defined; some versions ...


6

From glob's documentation: In scalar context, glob iterates through such filename expansions, returning undef when the list is exhausted. In other words, when you call glob is in scalar context, it returns the first expansion. The second call to that same glob instance returns the second expansion, and so on. When all expansions have been returned, ...


5

Use through2 to make a one-off custom plugin stream that does all of the dirty work. Unfortanately vinyl-transform and vinyl-source-stream and the solutions that go along with those have flaws so we have to go for something custom. var gulp = require('gulp'); var through = require('through2'); var browserify = require('browserify'); gulp.task('bundle', ...


5

This is the default behaviour. to get rid of it, enable nullglob: shopt -s nullglob From Greg's Wiki - nullglob: nullglob expands non-matching globs to zero arguments, rather than to themselves. ... Without nullglob, the glob would expand to a literal * in an empty directory, resulting in an erroneous count of 1. Or use zsh, which has ...


5

Looking at the accepted answer, it seems to use some form of glob syntax. It also reveals that the API is an exposure of Hadoop's FileInputFormat. Searching reveals that paths supplied to FileInputFormat's addInputPath or setInputPath "may represent a file, a directory, or, by using glob, a collection of files and directories". Perhaps, SparkContext also ...


5

Keep in mind that a * is expanded to a list of filenames by the shell before grep is started. Thus, you can expand those yourself: search() { local tgt=$1; shift # move first argument into local variable tgt (( "$#" )) || set -- * # if no other arguments exist, replace the remaining argument # ...list with filenames in ...


4

You were quite near. You need to append to the list which is outside the loop mxd_list = [] for top_dir, dir_list, obj_list in os.walk(top_path): mxd_list.extend([os.path.join(top_dir, obj) for obj in obj_list if obj.endswith('.mxd')]) The error is that - In every iteration of the outer for loop, the list comp would generate a list specific to that ...


4

Use this to avoid the unwanted iteration: shopt -s nullglob See: help shopt and shopt


4

The reason this is happening is because your wildcard matcher is matching absolutely anything up until it finds (i+1).txt If you know all of your files are in the format foo_bar_1.txt where there is an underscore before the file number, you could use this matcher: glob.glob('*_' + str(i + 1) + '.txt') and it would only return what you're looking for.


4

Try putting an r in front of the string to make a raw string: glob.glob(r'C:\Users\EDV\Desktop\Peter\Models\Texte\*\002.txt'). This will make it so the backslashes arent used for escaping the next character. You could also do it without glob like so: import os all_txt = [] root = r'C:\Users\EDV\Desktop\Peter\Models\Texte' for d in os.listdir(root): ...


4

You misunderstand what your glob is doing. You were expecting this: GM12878_Hs_InSitu_MboI_r[E1,E2,F,G1,G2,H]* to be a glob of files that have any of those comma-separated segments but that's not what [] globbing does. [] globbing is a character class expansion. Compare: $ echo GM12878_Hs_InSitu_MboI_r[E1,E2,F,G1,G2,H] ...


4

$array = range(380, 385); $string = '{' . implode(',', $array) . '}';


4

You could use File::Basename: use File::Basename; my @files = glob('/Perl/Assignment/*'); foreach my $file (@files){ print basename($file), "\n"; } It's been a part of core Perl for a long time. (Have to use parens in this case because otherwise it thinks the "\n" is an argument to basename instead of print.)


4

Like I said, you are passing callback parameter to a synchrounous call, change it to either work async or, remove the callback parameter: ... else { var files = glob(globPatterns, { sync: true }); if (removeRoot) { files = files.map(function(file) { return file.replace(removeRoot, ...


4

Assuming you mean "everything except one of the two patterns", you just combine them with a |: cp -r !(Backups.backupdb|Applications.noindex) /home/masi/Documents/


4

The way you are calling the script, the * gets expanded by Bash itself, so by saying python fileName.py /home/* this gets expanded into python fileName.py /home/file1 /home/file2 /home/file3 so sys.argv[1] is just /home/file1. To make it work, add the * in the Python script: import sys import glob def list_file(): return glob.glob(sys.argv[1] + ...


4

Looking at https://www.selenic.com/mercurial/hgignore.5.html#syntax Neither glob nor regexp patterns are rooted. A glob-syntax pattern of the form *.c will match a file ending in .c in any directory, and a regexp pattern of the form .c$ will do the same. To root a regexp pattern, start it with ^. According to this, the glob */*/*.obj will match .obj ...


4

glob is the name of the module, the name of the function is glob.glob. file_path = glob.glob(os.path.join(dir,"*.mdi"))


3

Without using any regex syntax that might or might not be supported (I don't see any evidence for it either), you could get the same behavior with four rules: *.foo.[a-z] *.foo.[a-z][a-z] *.foo.[a-z][a-z][a-z] *.foo.[a-z][a-z][a-z][a-z] If you wanted to compromise slightly, you could use *.foo.?* (anything ending in foo, a dot, and at least one more ...


3

Fish's documentation does not claim to support the full power of POSIX glob patterns. Quoting the docs: Wildcards If a star (*) or a question mark (?) is present in the parameter, fish attempts to match the given parameter to any files in such a way that: ? can match any single character except /. * can match any string of characters not ...


3

The glob[path]() functions only support a limited set of :help wildcards. You cannot do alternation like with regular expressions. Instead, just invoke the function multiple times and concatenate the results: :echo globpath('C:\Users\Pedro\Desktop', 'foo.tex') . globpath('C:\Users\Pedro\Desktop', 'foo.py') Recent Vim versions support the , {list} flag, ...


3

Here's what your script receives: python cli.py -f file1 file2 file3 fileN Where N is a total number of files matched by that pattern (Shell expands wildcards automatically). On the other hand, your file argument is configured to receive just one file/pattern, thus the simplest (and the best, in my opinion) solution is to add the nargs='+' argument: ...


3

use gulp.src([app/**/*.js, !app/**/*.min.js]) look at the ! before min.js



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible