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0

You can use dynamic allocation, just like you would for any other type. The only difference here is that dynamically allocated mutexes must be initialised with pthread_mutex_init(): pthread_mutex_t *mutex; size_t n_mutex; int main (int argc, char **argv) { size_t i; if (argc < 2) return 1; n_mutex = atoi(argv[1]); if (n_mutex ...


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The problem with what you did is that from file1 import * didn't import t because it didn't exist. If you repeat the import line, it will work: >>> from file1 import * >>> test_globals() >>> t Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> NameError: name 't' is not defined >>> from ...


1

If you look in the debugger window in Apps Script, you will see that globals get assigned to the this object. As an alternative to globals, you could use the this object . If you use globals, then values are already being assigned to the this object, so using it to assign your own properties isn't much different. The this keyword is an object that Apps ...


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When you use a variable definition such as in your example that calls a Google Service you have to be conscious that this call will be executed each time you run any function in your project. This means that even if it's probably efficient in terms of code writing (we are all lazy guys I guess) it is really not efficient in terms of execution speed. On the ...


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There is a purist view and a pragmatic view. Pragmatically the disadvantages you may face naming conflict potential with any libraries you attach losing track of globals defined in multiple scripts in a project variables calling API endpoints will always run whether that instance of your script requires them or not. I do use globals, but in a slightly ...


1

Well, global variables can be edited from everywhere. Basically, in the low level, a variable is stored in RAM memory and created after launching your application, it always has an address in RAM. Defines are just macros, your compiler will just replace your define names with its values in the compilation step. #define can't be edited, it's just a macros. ...


1

Consider this small example #define num 5 int number = 5; num is a macro and number is a global variable. One important difference is that num is not stored in the memory, num is just the substitute for 5, but number uses memory. Also, macro's are preprocessor directives, their values cannot be changed like variables. So, no doing num = 6; later in ...


-4

define is declared on top of the code, it means before the declaration of the class. And it serves as to define (as the name says) a constant, that can be read but not changed. A global variable can be accessed globally on the code, and at same time changed.


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Global variables can be accessed and edited from everywhere. #define constants can't be edited, just read. Examples: We use #define ERROR 666 to define a programmer pre compile time constant for an error for the whole program. We use a global variable for a count of how many operations a function did and this value can be read by other functions as well. ...


0

You can use $_SESSION, i.e.: script1.php <?php session_start(); $_SESSION['myVar'] = "something"; ?> script2.php <?php session_start(); echo $_SESSION['myVar']; //something ?>


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Utility classes are are evil, even though they may look very useful and convenient. This post explains it in more details: http://www.yegor256.com/2014/05/05/oop-alternative-to-utility-classes.html If you're writing true object-oriented software you should use objects instead, no matter how many of them you will create.


1

An answer without needing to use JQuery: var test = 'Test Variable'; //initialises the variable 'test' window.onload = function() { alert(test); };


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You need to alert the variable test, not the string "test", as in: $(document).ready(function() { alert(test); });


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How about this: $("input[type='submit'][value='Search']").click(function(){ form.act.value='detailSearch'; clicked = true; return true; });


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You can use Esprima or another JS AST parser to turn the function into a clean structure. Then you can recursively analyse it. It is a bit too big to write as a StackOverflow answer, but in a nutshell, start with: var ast = esprima.parse(foo); Dive into .body, and recursively analyse it. Look for .type == "VariableDeclaration", that will contain local ...


1

In my own opinion, I always find as a web app develops, you will start to realize there are more and more fields that you want the user to setup as their preference, as a good practice to relax the application. For me I usually setup a meta_data model with name, value, criteria, and some other fields. For example, when viewing your web page, 'Alice' may ...


0

Globals aren't shared across processes. Setting a global in one process changes it in that process only.


5

So as I guessed you are using a framework as you said in the comments: @Rizier123 Yes, I'm using Laravel. Does it matter? – Kai 6 mins ago And if it matters? Yes it does. Probably what is happening here is, that the code which you show us here is wrapped into another function somewhere else. Means that the variables in the Sum() function are in ...


0

For the behaviour you expect, the following would work: class cc_10(cc_a): v1 = 10 This will inherit v2 and v3 from the superclass, but overrides v1. Alternatively, call set_v1 on the subclass after you've finished defining it: class cc_10(cc_a): pass cc_10.set_v1(10)


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A workaround i am using. is to create an empty file somewhere. then the one prog. could READ from this file (say every 2 sec or so) if it is empty, then do nothing. and the other could WRITE to this file if needed. After a WRITE, the other program would READ the written data from the file, use this as the new VAR. and then clear the file, ready for a new ...


1

You can make use of PHP sessions. The session variables are super globals and can be accessed anywhere until you destroy the session. You just need to mention the starting of a session by <?php session_start(); //...your code $_SESSION['variable']=$variable; //....your code ?> On the page you would wanna set the variable and ...


1

As said - please expand on what error you are receiving. But from looking at your code, try defining rainTotal before you enter the inner loop. i.e: for i in range(1, years + 1): rainTotal=int() #here for i in range(1, months + 1):


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The main problem is the first loop, where you assign the value returned by setDate() to the array which is the time in millis(So you have an error like dateinterval[i].getDay is not a function) //Defining a date array (works fine) for (var i = 0; i < difference; i++) { var dt = new Date(dateinterval[0]); dt.setDate(dt.getDate() + i); ...


2

In your loop you want to use $field for echo and not $form_fields. If you do not want to use the global keyword: function step_1() { global $form_fields; foreach($form_fields as $field) { echo $field . '<br />'; } } Then the only other possibility is to access the $_GLOBALS Collection: function step_1() { ...


0

You can get the result from the activities where the user enters the response and handle it from a MainActivity that manages all the responses. Another option to avoid storing information in the Application class could be to have a Singleton with a Shared Instance that stores the global variables. However, the use of singletons is considered a bad practice ...


0

You can add one method in application class to increment value public class MyApplication extends Application { private int grade=0; public int incrementGrade() { this.grade = grade + 1; } public int setGrade(int grade) { this.grade = grade; } public int getGrade() { return grade; } } and increment when needed MyApplication myApplication ...


0

you have to increment the original application value .. not the copy to maintain the variable in between the activities if (rbtn[0].getText().toString().equals("Boy")) { grade++; } change to if (rbtn[0].getText().toString().equals("Boy")) { ((MyApplication) this.getApplication()).setGrade(grade++) }


2

The grade you are incrementing is local and private to your activity. It is also a primitive, rather than an object, so grade = .getGrade() will set the local variable to the same value as the global value, it is not some kind of reference. Instead, do something like this: MyApplication myApplication = ((MyApplication) this.getApplication()); ...


2

you need to define global to $form_fields in function. Like this: function step_1() { global $form_fields; foreach($form_fields as $field) { echo $form_fields . '<br />'; } }


0

What I do is creating a class and put all static variables in it. So for example, class Values { static public Activity frontActivity = null; static public int currentStatus = Status.IDLE; } and access them like Values.frontActivity = this; Values.currentStatis = Status.ACTIVE;


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Write your code in function void func() { std::uniform_real_distribution<>::param_type Params(-0.3,0.3); sample.param(Params); }


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You can't just do this in global scope: sample.param(Params); You have to do it within some function: void setupParams() { sample.param(std::uniform_real_distribution<>::param_type{-0.3, 0.3}); } Which could be wrapped in the constructor of some other type: class MyDistribution { public: MyDistribution() { ...


1

The problem is rather hard to solve, as sending and collecting replies are isolated. It seems that send() sends a packet and handle() receives a reply, and there can be many possible unrelated packets between sending and receiving. If it's the case then a special global map should be created to link requests and responses. For cases when there are 2 ...


0

Turns out I was missing a line of code the properly print out the current state of the list. Feel like a complete idiot right now. Thanks to those of you that helped out.


0

You declare customers as a an int in the header-file. Keep in mind that the header-file is literary pasted into the files it is included in. So you will have many instances of that variable. The correct way to do it is to define it in a cpp-file, and make it global by using extern int customers in your header-file. The same issue is true for your ...


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If there is any direct/indirect relation between dialog and fragment? If yes then use interface to pass your variable, if not than you can use static variable, but try to avoid static variable/classes and change your code to avoid static keyword Create interface and implement it in your dialog fragment than pass this reference to your adapter and initialize ...


1

You could make a protocol to save and access data across view controllers. Here's one way to do it. // Make a custom protocol delegate with a method to store the variable. In this case I'll store a boolean. protocol storeViewControllerBVariableDelegate { func storeVariable(data: Bool?) } // In your view controller A, assign your custom protocol ...


0

Here are two solutions that I can think of for passing variables between view controllers Global Option ViewController2.swift import UIKit var globalVariable = String() class ViewController1: UIViewConroller { } ViewController2.swift class ViewController2: UIViewController { overload func viewDidLoad() { globalVariable = "some string ...


2

The issue with the static member variable is that you have the definition occur in the header file. If you #include the file in multiple source files, you have multiple definitions of the static member variable. To fix this, the header file should consist only of this: #ifndef HEADER_H #define HEADER_H // In the header file class A { public: void ...


0

Declare x as extern in header.h to tell the compiler that x will be defined somewhere else: extern int x; Then define x once in the source file which you think is most fitting. For example in otherSource.cpp: int x = some_initial_value;


0

It looks like you're doing an async-request but updating the var idResult synchronously. So you should put the call to send_PRIVGRP_INVITE(idResult) into the callback or response handler of send_CLIENT_LOOKUP(userName)


1

Why don't you try: keys(window); The Object.keys() method returns an array of a given object's own enumerable properties, in the same order as that provided by a for...in loop (the difference being that a for-in loop enumerates properties in the prototype chain as well). Reference: ...


4

In header file, only declare them. extern const float GLOBAL_AVG_SET1; extern const float GLOBAL_AVG_SET2; extern const int TOTAL_USERS; extern const int TOTAL_MOVIES; extern double **user_feature_table; extern double **movie_feature_table; In one of your .cpp files, define and initialize them: const float GLOBAL_AVG_SET1 = 3.608609; const float ...


1

Basically, since you are using the "<-" assignment, the function is creating a copy of the 'global' variable for use within the scope of the function. This can be seen by adding in a second function g() which alters the value of 'global' before it is printed out in f(), but this time using the "<<-" assignment. The first line in f() creates your ...


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I don't think you should store user's selected options in Global variable because these aren't common variable to be used throughout the user session. You can save it in database when user redirects to 2nd page and retrieve on score view screen. Also, You may need this information in future to retain the user's records. EDIT - In case you can not store ...


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Add this line to your ~/.bash_profile: export PATH=$HOME/.composer/vendor/bin:$PATH


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Yes, many a times that's the problem with doing export PATH. You should append the environment variable directly into your .bash_profile file! This will be permanent and solve your purpose,thereby, making your package used globally without any further problem with the package's path. Append the following to the end of your .bash_profile file,and replace ...


1

You do have access to window object from your webpacked script. Webpack does not interfere with it since the wrapper function only injects module, exports and __webpack_require__ arguments. Try it writing a script with a single line accessing window object and then check out the output script. Your assignation should work, unless the execution never ...


0

For example if you want to pass the value for name from Form1 to Form2 just Add a static field declaration on Form2 to hold the Name value and from Form1 you can access those static field like that Form2.Name public partial class Form2 : Form { public static string Name; public static int value; public Form2() { ...


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I believe you are simply a little confused by what <<- actually does. From help("<<-"): The operators <<- and ->> are normally only used in functions, and cause a search to made through parent environments for an existing definition of the variable being assigned. If such a variable is found (and its binding is not locked) then ...



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