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6

This thread is a few years old but is still the one that comes up as the best search result, so I'm answering with what finally worked for me. This is based off of http://tmux.svn.sourceforge.net/viewvc/tmux/trunk/FAQ ...but the instructions aren't completely clear on when or where to substitute the -256color string. I use gnome-terminal (v 3.16.2) with ...


5

Ctrl+a+\ - Exit screen and terminate all programs in this screen. It is helpful, for example, if you need to close tty connection. Ctrl+a+d - "minimize" screen, screen -r to restore it.


4

To those arriving via web search (several years later)... When using screen, your scrollback buffer is a combination of both the screen scrollback buffer as the two previous answers have noted, as well as your putty scrollback buffer. Be sure that you are increasing BOTH the putty scrollback buffer as well as the screen scrollback buffer, else your putty ...


4

Use <prefix>+m toggle mouse mode on or off bind m run "if [[ `tmux show-option -w | grep mode-mouse.*on` ]]; then toggle=off; else toggle=on; fi; tmux display-message \"mouse tmux: \$toggle\"; tmux set-option -w mode-mouse \$toggle &> /dev/null; for cmd in mouse-select-pane mouse-resize-pane mouse-select-window; do tmux set-option -g \$cmd ...


3

You may create a detached screen and then send commands to it. For example: screen -d -m -S shared screen -S shared -X -p 0 stuff $'cd /home/nodejsapp\n' screen -S shared -X -p 0 stuff $'node start.js app.js\n' If you need to attach to the screen session afterwards, then you can add one more line: screen -S shared -r See screen's manual for more ...


3

Given I can't comment I am posting this as a new answer. troyfolger's answer is a good idea and basically amounts to try and send the session a command that will do very little the problem is he has the arguments wrong and it should be -X not -Q so the correct command is screen -S Jetty -X select . ; echo $? Which send the command "select ." to the screen ...


3

Use set -x (or invoke bash -x yourscript) to print each line as it's evaluated with values expanded in a way that makes hidden characters visible and human-readable. Most likely, you'll see something like the following: [ 'There is no screen to be attached matching sctest' = $'There is no screen to be attached matching sctest\r' ] ...with the latter ...


2

You can try the following xterm -geometry 132x50+10+30 -e 'screen -c ./my_special_screenrc' the ./my_special_screenrc should contain screen -t map 1 ./map #run the "map" command screen -t chat 2 ./chat #run the "chat" command split select 1 #the map - defined above focus select 2 #the chat tested with the following, ./map command while : do ...


2

Invoking screen from within the screen window would not create new screen sessions. Instead, only new screen windows are created (just like ctrl-a c) and the new screen windows are running in the same screen session. You can verify this by pressing ctrl-a w. But you can force it to create new screen sessions, for example, with screen -S session-name. A ...


2

This worked for me very well. Get the screen id via: screen -r or screen -ls then kill the screen: kill -9 <screenID> it now becomes a dead screen, then wipe it out with: screen -wipe


2

How do you debug a C/C++ MPI program? One way is to start a separate terminal and gdb session for each of the processes: mpirun -n <NP> xterm -hold -e gdb -ex run --args ./program [arg1] [arg2] [...] where NP is the number of processes. What if you don't have a GUI handy? (See below for a handy script.) This is based on timofiend's answer here. ...


2

I think this answer in the "How do I debug an MPI program?" thread does what you want. EDITS: In response to the comment, you can do it somewhat more easily, although succinct isnt exactly the term I would use: Launch a detached screen via mpirun - running your debugger and process. I've called the session mpi, and im passing through my library path ...


2

There is more than one problem: xtermc does not match any terminal that you are likely to encounter (noted in xterm FAQ What $TERM should I use? dtterm does not match xtermc either (use infocmp xtermc dtterm to see). Sun stopped providing up-to-date terminal entries about 20 years ago. Perhaps the last change was related to dtterm. At the time, their ...


2

The command you're looking for is focus prev. Unfortunately, there is no way to bind Shift+Tab, since bind does not allow for modifier keys, and Tab is equivalent to Ctrl+i (which also explains why it's bound to focus instead of info), so you'd have to bind it to a different key.


2

You should use screen without quotes, then should be ok.


2

Screen unsets various environment variables (including LD_LIBRARY_PATH, see this Unix StackExchange answer for details). As you've discovered, setting os.environ['LD_LIBRARY_PATH'] doesn't fix the ImportError because this environment variable must be set when the process launches. The easiest way to fix this is to modify your screen invocation as follows: $ ...


1

I suspect your issue is actually that lines aren't being placed in the scrollback buffer at all, rather than tmux taking over the mouse and keys. Tmux by default uses the "alternate screen buffer" (you may notice that if you have text on the screen, then attach and detach tmux, the text will come back). Many terminal emulators will not place text that is ...


1

All the solutions proposed don't deal with screen names that don't have unique patterns, e.g. "TEST" and "TEST123". When you screen -S "TEST" or screen -list "TEST", you may find yourself selecting the screen "TEST123"! There is something wrong (non-deterministic) in how GNU screen implements screen name matching. Below is a bash function that tries to do ...


1

Neovim is a project that aim to give vim attach/detach feature like tmux. This feature isn't yet implemented (june 19th 2015), but this may come soon. There is many other core features for this project that you can see at neovim.io.


1

Can you give the screen object a command in python? Like: from os import system command = 'screen ' + '/dev/ttyUSB0 38400' result = system(command) result('ATZ')???


1

If you run screen with -Dm, it will not return to you command line prompt (the "no fork" idea; that's why it doesn't do anything until your java exits if you have no ampersand). If you run it with the -dm, it returns to your command line prompt immediately. By putting the -Dm in the background, you have caused it to fork and set $! with the PID of your ...


1

Thanks to @JID comments I was able to find what i was looking for. I removed the screen from hash bang and used the method from the link provided by @JID here in the first answer. I ended up with #!/bin/bash if [ -z "$STY" ]; then exec screen -L /bin/bash "$0"; fi ./myscript.sh Now when I run the above, myscript.sh runs in screen and the whole output ...


1

I guess you've found the answer but I am posting this solution because I had the same issue, and other people may be interested in it too. Once you're in the screen, run your program with sudo : $ sudo python programme.py Then you can detach and exit your ssh session without getting any permission error with numpy.savetxt.


1

The screen program creates two processes to manage the pseudo-terminal and the user's display. One end of the pseudo-terminal is connected to the actual terminal, and the other is connected to shells which are run within screen. Any program using pseudo-terminals (such as a terminal emulator) does this. screen (the parent process) SCREEN (the child ...


1

As you can see, /var/run/screen/S-heechan is empty, so there is no socket file inside. Your screen is terminated. Perhaps you forgot to detach and exited instead? (To detach, use ctrl+a d )


1

put this in the end of the .tmux.conf file. set-window-option -g automatic-rename off set-option -g allow-rename off then reload the tmux config file. This works for me .


1

I encountered the same problem today. Thank everyone for the heads-up. The final solution I found out is that to set the mintty term type to: vt220. There must be something not right about the "xterm". After that, everything is good.


1

While ssh'd into a remote (older) system I noticed that $TERM indicated I was using 'screen-256color', however there was no termcap/terminfo entry for that, so I was forced to resort to the following in .bashrc to prevent the terminal from producing occasional garbage: case $TERM in (screen-256color) export TERM='screen' esac to get it to use the ...


1

For me it sounds like you scroll in your terminal (with you scrollwheel?). Of course your terminal emulator won't know the history of the screen. To scroll inside screen you have to switch into copy mode (Ctrl A + [), then you can move around with your navigation keys (hjkl,left right up down;PgUp,PgDown eth).


1

Put single quotes around the whole thing, instead of double quotes. Double quotes still do expansion inside, single quotes don't. BTW if you need to escape things in the middle of a string, you can break it like "foo "'something'" bar"



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