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25

See question 3544035. Also discussed here and there. It depends on what use you will have for your static library. If you only want to link it into programs, it doesn't need PIC code (libtool calls that a convenience library, because you could pretty much do without it, it simply helps get your compilation process to a reasonable size, for example). ...


14

strcmp function is declared in string.h try to put #include <string.h> in DynamicLibrary.cpp and stderr is defained in stdio.h so put that too #include <stdio.h> From time to time I found open source code with missing header files as well.


7

Welcome, you're not alone. The story I don't know why ARM cross-compiling is such a nightmare. It's not my opinion, let's see, what others say... Building a gcc / glibc cross-toolchain for use in embedded systems development used to be a scary prospect, requiring iron will, days if not weeks of effort, lots of Unix and Gnu lore, and sometimes ...


7

I did the conversion. The reason I made them a joined repository was partly historical and partly practical. Historically gdb and binutils have pretty much always been together. They were in a single source tree (called "devo") when they were maintained inside Cygnus. Then, later, when sourceware.org was set up, they shared a repository (called "src"). ...


6

Your simplest solution is to just run CentOS 5.3 in a VM (e.g. Sun VirtualBox). This requires minimal setup, has quite reasonable overhead (assuming an Intel Mac), and you'll be able to actually test and debug what you are building. If you really insist on cross-compiling, you must build a cross-compiler. Instructions are here and here, but beware: it will ...


6

My first question would be: why are you assembling the code? If you want the assembler code the, by all means, use gcc -S to get it (for viewing, I guess). But you don't need to run that through as to keep going, just use: gcc -o hello hello.c gcc -S hello.c That first step will turn the C source directly into an executable, the second will give you your ...


5

Here is how I do it: > gcc -S forums.c > as forums.s -o forums.o > gcc forums.o -o forums > ./forums test Why do I invoke gcc instead of ld? Because GCC takes care of linking the C runtime, and doing other implementation-dependant stuff. If you want to see that, use the --verbose option: > gcc --verbose forums.o -o forums Using built-in ...


5

You can have the linker search for a library named without the lib prefix: gcc main.o -L/path/to/foo -l:foo.a This is especially useful in environments where a list of libraries is specified and the -l flag is prepended later (eg some makefiles or eclipse CDT)


5

Use awk awk '{c[$0]++} END {for (line in c) print c[line], line}' <bigfile.txt This is O(n) in time, and O(unique lines) in space.


4

Here are the default commands/parameters used to build the binary packages. Download the sources, unpack and issue them: cd [binutils-build] [binutils-source]/configure --target=arm-elf --prefix=[toolchain-prefix] --enable-interwork --enable-multilib --with-float=soft make all install export PATH="$PATH:[toolchain-prefix]/bin" cd [gcc-build] ...


4

Zeus is a language neutral IDE that can be be configured for almost any programming langauge. It has features like syntax highlighting, code folding, project/workspace management, class browsing, macro scripting, integrated version control, ftp editing etc.


4

You can link against any library, e.g. foo.a, by specifying full path to it on the link line: gcc main.o /path/to/foo.a What you lose with non-standard library name is the ability for the linker to search for it, e.g. this will not work: gcc main.o -L/path/to foo.a When I link a library such as libm in with ld Note that in general you should not ...


4

Installing tcprstat For portability and ease of use, we build a single statically linked binary, which can be downloaded and used as-is on 64-bit platforms. At present there is no installation mechanism, so to use tcprstat, you simply need to Download the statically linked 64-bit binary (version 0.3.1) Move it into a directory in your PATH, such as ...


4

I finally found out the solution for the issue. I noticed that, in Proteus, there is option to configure the toolchain and build the source code from Proteus itself. I just did the foloowing things Selected GNU ARM toolchain from the list of supported compilers Configured the tool chain path to point to my arm-none-eabi tool chain. Created a new project ...


3

You should really have put more effort with using crosstool-NG, since the crosstool mailing list is very reactive. Since understanding the whole process is a huge task, understanding how to use a tool that you might reuse is IMHO more interesting.


3

It doesn't require shared libs per se, it just warns you that some things might not work properly if you link statically to glibc. Some of those things are the nsswitch, see e.g. /etc/nsswitch.conf .On a system different ways of looking up users/groups/hostnames and other things can be configured and altered via plugins - e.g. samba comes with a module for ...


3

EDIT: okay, I tried this all out on my system, and I think I know what the problem is. ld is writing to a.out (its default output file), while reading from it at the same time. Try something like this: ld a.out -o myprog


3

Have you looked at Padre, the Perl Application Development and Refactoring Environment? It's still in development so you can help make it better.


3

Try -gstabs+ when compiling with g++ to try with GNU extensions debugging information (only understood by gdb).


3

Do you have libgcc_s.so.1 on teh file system? If not, the toolchain will have a folder to copy onto the file system. Do that. If you do, ensure LD_LIBRARY_PATH is correctly set. EDIT: Generic issue resolution When you create a executable, you link to libraries. Those libraries must also be present in the environment where you run the executable. Hence in ...


3

The CLZ instruction was introduced in ARMv5. The ARM7TDMI and ARM9 do not have this instruction.


3

Try using gcc as ld frontend. Change: $(TOOLCHAIN)ld -o check.elf [...] into $(TOOLCHAIN)gcc -o check.elf [...] GCC knows to add some necessary options when invoking ld.


3

It is (fairly) easy in Perl: #!/usr/bin/env perl use strict; use warnings; $, = ","; while (<>) { chomp; my @fields = split /,/; my @sorted = sort(@fields); $sorted[scalar(@sorted)-1] .= "\n"; print @sorted; } The trickiness involves saving the sorted array so that the newline can be added to the last element of the array, so ...


3

what the IDE/compiler will add to the code after selecting a particular "Microcontroller" in device list of keil or AVR Studio or PIC etc..? You are getting it wrong. Let's take a different approach: Think of a C program as a specification for your processor i.e description in human readable language how it should perform sequentially. Now each ...


3

There is no point building a 32 bit driver when you target Solaris 11.2 as this kernel is only released as 64 bit. Both Solaris Studio and gcc can be used. The former is likely more popular for everything kernel related and you'll probably find more documentation about using it than gcc.


3

This was fixed in the most recent release of cabal-install. Upgrading should solve the problem.


2

You can try Geany for gnome. It's relatively new, but interesting. And it seems to be lightweight. http://www.geany.org/


2

Notepad++ is another Scintilla-based (as SciTE) source code editor.



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