New answers tagged

2

Is it possible to inspect the generated binary to know the final value of MAX_NUM_REL? No, at least not directly. MAX_NUM_REL is a macro, not a variable. The preprocessor replaces the macro name with its expansion (whichever that is) everywhere that it appears as a preprocessing token within the scope of the macro definition. If it appears anywhere ...


2

It is not possible to inspect the final value of MAX_NUM_REL that way: this is not a variable but a placeholder that will be replaced by the value you defined just before the actual compilation of your code (during the preprocessing phase). The only thing you can control is the consequence of using it: For example, should you have the following line ...


0

That's not actually a symbol. If you were trying to search for MAX_NUM_REL, that's no good since this is a #define which means that it's not even a variable because all the work is done by the preprocessor (so this exact name doesn't go into the binary file). To find this value you need to have the source code and then see where this define is used and ...


1

Say you have 72 minutes, so 72*60 seconds which equals to 4320, then as at each second you have 1000000 ticks you finally have 4320000000 ticks each 72 minutes. 4320000000 is approximatively the maximum value an unsigned 32 bit int could store before overflowing. Now the title of your question as nothing to do with the content of your message. What is the ...


3

I always thought of c++ as an expansion of C, but it sounds like they're different enough that this is not an advisable path. C++ is not an expansion of C. They are completely different languages. Compiling C code with C++ is not simply enabling "OO-mode". When you compile anything but trivial C code with a C++ compiler, you are potentially opening ...


0

I think you should have a look here to get a list of (possible) issues. What I did in the past for a C to C++ mgration was to leave the C code working as it should (C code compiled with a C compiler) and - in parallel - rewrite the code from scratch in C++.


1

You can create a script called configure.sh and add it to your $PATH so you can execute the commands you are looking for. For example: #/bin/bash ./configure --includedir=/local/home/myFolder -CPPFLAGS="I/home/foo/include" To run the script: ./configure.sh


3

From man readdir(3): The only fields in the dirent structure that are mandated by POSIX.1 are: d_name[], of unspecified size, with at most NAME_MAX characters preceding the terminating null byte; and (as an XSI extension) d_ino. The other fields are unstandardized, and not present on all systems; see NOTES below for some further details. then continues ...


2

It does not. However, you can use the open function directly! This is part of Linux itself, not the C standard library (technically the C standard library provides a small wrapper to allow you to call it as a C function). Example usage: int fd = open("file_name.ext", O_RDWR); // not fopen // do stuff with fd close(fd); // not fclose Note: The man page ...


1

bool loese(int feld[9] [9]) { int zahl, spalte, reihe; int *pspalte, *preihe; pspalte=&spalte; preihe=&reihe; if (!finde_leeres_feld(feld, preihe, pspalte)) //<<<<<<<<<< return true; You are passing a pointer to the uninizialized variable spalte to finde_leeres_feld which ...


2

You're looking for LIBRARY_PATH. LD_LIBRARY_PATH is for loading dynamic libraries at runtime, not compile time. Side note: when adding on to existing environment variables, make sure to use $LD_LIBRARY_PATH instead of just LD_LIBRARY_PATH. Otherwise, you're discarding the original contents and putting in the literal text LD_LIBRARY_PATH. So it should ...


1

For this reason you need to have mylib placed in the paths known to the linker. For example somewhere like /usr/lib or /usr/local/lib. In your case it works with pthread because it is already located in the system known paths.


0

I found that screen will create a new screenlog.n file automatically if I delete the existing one while a screen session is detached. I simply scheduled a cronjob to copy and rename the existing file and then delete it. A new screenlog.n file is created as soon as there is something new to log.


2

You can use pattern rules (previously known as "suffix rules") for that. As you use GNU make, you can write this line to compile all .cpp files in src/ to .o files in objects/, assuming the Makefile is placed in the top directory: objects/%.o: src/%.cpp $(CXX) -c $(CFLAGS) $< -o $@ In GNU make syntax $< denotes the dependency (a .cpp file in ...


0

Per @J.J Hakala com ports are just named com1, com2, etc in windows. They are in the root directory so ./com1 works as well. There is no need to install drivers.


0

OK - some digging around in the python source reveals the answer. The problem is that in InteractiveConsole the namespace is set to something other than __main__. But rlcompleter completes from builtins and __main__. Import string above imports into the current namespace, which isn't __main__ and isn't searched by rlcompleter. So, a solution is to ...


0

Error: libtool-devel has been replaced by libtool; please install libtool instead.


0

You are probably missing 32 bit versions of standard development libraries for C. See also Error "gnu/stubs-32.h: No such file or directory" while compiling Nachos source code.


1

Not 100 %, As per your question you want to maintain your own memory region. so you need to go for your own my_malloc, my_realloc and my_free Implementing your own my_malloc may help you void* my_malloc(int size) { char* ptr = malloc(size+sizeof(int)); memcpy(ptr, &size, sizeof(int)); return ptr+sizeof(int); } This is just a ...


0

It is not very hard to implement your own my_alloc and my_free and use preferred memory range. It is simple chain of: block size, flag free/in use, and block data plus final-block marker (e.g. block size = 0). In the beginning you have one large free block and know its address. Note that my_alloc returns the address of block data and block size/flag are few ...


0

Iam using Tasking and I can store data in a specific space of memory. For example I can use: testVar _at(0x200000); I'm not sure if this is what you are looking for, but for example I'am using it to store data to external RAM. But as far as I know, it's only workin for global variables.


0

Because bison was been installed,the default version on osx is 2.3. So we should do something as follow: Install a higher version os bison If you use Brew, try to use this command--brew install bison, it will install bison 3.0.2. The binary package is under /usr/local/Cellar/bison/3.0.4/bin/ in my computer. Or you can install bison through source ...


0

You can use a version script for your linker to define, which symbols should be exported in the symbol table. Such a version script can look like this: { global: symb1; symb2; symb3; local: *; }; This example will only export the symbols symb1-3, all other symbols are omitted from the symbol table. Now specify this script as version ...


1

The bad news is that, by default, the web client package does not support HTTPS. If you check the source code of the open-socket-for-uri procedure it is clear that only "plain" HTTP is supported. The good news is that you can specify the #:port parameter to http-get (and all of the http-* methods) to pass a TLS-encrypted I/O port. GnuTLS-Guile provides a ...


1

Please read the documentation for recursive calls in GNU make. Essentially, you need to call $(MAKE) or ${MAKE} instead of plain make or at least prefix the line in the recipe with + so that the sub-make can properly communicate with the parent make. This is particularly useful when you ask for job control.


2

The linker scripts are intended to be used by the linker, not the run-time linker. The GNU ld script comment should have been a giveaway: this is for ld, not for ld.so. ;-) See for instance: http://www.math.utah.edu/docs/info/ld_3.html So I guess using this with dlopen() would mean mimicking/importing part of ld's magic for this, which would confirm your ...


3

The weak_alias function tells the linker that fork is to be a weak alias for __fork. That is, this definition of fork is a weak symbol. If there is no other definition of a symbol called fork, this definition stands; if there is another (non-weak) definition of fork then that non-weak definition stands and the weak definition is ignored. A weak alias is a ...


4

from https://github.com/lattera/glibc/blob/master/include/libc-symbols.h /* Define ALIASNAME as a weak alias for NAME. If weak aliases are not available, this defines a strong alias. */ # define weak_alias(name, aliasname) _weak_alias (name, aliasname) # define _weak_alias(name, aliasname) \ extern __typeof (name) aliasname __attribute__ ((weak, alias ...


2

You already have the gnu-sed installed without the --default-names option. With that option it installs sed to /usr/local/bin/, without that option it installs gsed. So what you gotta do is: $ brew uninstall gnu-sed $ brew install gnu-sed --default-names Update path if needed... $ echo $PATH | grep -q '/usr/local/bin'; [ $? -ne 0 ] && export ...



Top 50 recent answers are included