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0

What you could do is put all your gnuplot instructions in a standard text file, instead of a shell script. Then, you can execute this set of instruction in the gnuplot command prompt using: load 'my_instruction_file.txt' This way your gnuplot script is executed and you can still add instructions in the prompt.


1

Fast Fourier is an overkill for your application, you just need to lowpass filter your samples to reduce the noise. I'm assuming your sample input has a constant rate, so: 1) Identify the maximum frequency you're interested in. (An spectrogram or a Fourier plot of you samples might help here to identify it, use a math software for it (octave, matlab, ...


0

If you're already using bash commands, then you could use awk to preprocess your data: # Get number of lines in file 1 n1 = word(system("wc -l file1"), 1) # Create command to preprocess data filename = "< cat file1 file2 | awk '{if(NR < 1+".n1."){print $18/-200., $4/200.} else{print $3*200, $7/400.}}'" fit f(x) filename using 1:2 via a,b Or ...


0

You will have to do it by hand. The most reliable way is probably to make all the key by hand : Remove all automatic key by issuing unset key Set custom variables to position your key: KEY_X=0.1 KEY_Y=0.9 JUMP=0.05 IDX=1 For each plot command, issue before it a corresponding set label (point styles) or set arrow (line styles). E.g., set label IDX "a" ...


2

Did you actually try it? gnuplot distinguishes a comma between parametric coordinates and the end of a plot-element as it is called (which can contain a for-loop): this is simply done by counting the number of coordinates given. E.g., set parametric set size ratio -1 plot for [i=1:3] cos(t),i*sin(t) title "Ellipse ".i, \ for [i=1:3] i*cos(t),i*sin(t) ...


0

As hinted in the comments, the solution is simply modifying the command like this: stats 'data.dat' skip 1 max_col = STATS_columns


1

You have to repeat the for condition: plot for [i=1:words(par)] g(x, word(par,i)), for [i=1:words(par)] f(x, word(par,i))


1

I think your only recourse is to plot a function, something like set parametric plot [-pi/2:pi/2] sin(t),cos(t)


1

You can actually use gnuplot to preprocess that data. Let's suppose that your data looks like 7.20051 7.65602 7.87180 8.64177 8.92575 8.65913 8.98814 9.45199 8.40334 8.75102 8.65440 8.21088 8.59719 8.23259 8.34794 8.41658 7.67074 8.44228 8.54347 9.04961 9.18177 Then running the first part of your script binwidth=0.1 bin(x,width)=width*floor(x/width) + ...


0

There are also other "line styles" that are set for all lines at once without index, e.g., for linespoints: set style data linespoints plot '-', '-' 1, 1 2, 2 3, 3 e 1, 1 2, 4 3, 9 e Have a look at the "Style" section of the TOC of the manual http://www.gnuplot.info/docs_5.0/gnuplot.pdf for other things that can be set by ...


0

columnheader(n) More verbose / flexible than set key autotitle columnheader: plot 'my.dat' using 1:2 title columnheader(2), \ '' using 1:3 title columnheader(3) Tested on Gnuplot 4.6, Ubuntu 15.10.


1

To move the labels in the pie-chart inwards or outwards, change the "-0.5" in front of the sin and cos. To move the labels and the color-squares, change (i*0.25) to (i*0.25)-1.2 in the third and fourth plot. Update: Change (i*0.25) to e.g. (i*0.18) to make the distance between the labels smaller. And change ps 4 to e.g. ps 3 to make the squares smaller. ...


2

You should probably use UTF-8. Here's what I did: set terminal epscairo enhanced color dashed rounded size 5.5, 5.62 set encoding utf8 set output '2008.eps' unset key set xtics nomirror rotate by -45 scale 0 font ",15" set style data histogram set boxwidth 0.2 set grid y set yrange [*:20000] set style fill solid border plot '2008.csv' using ...


1

Use set format x; set terminal pngcairo enhanced color dashed \ rounded size 1200,500 set title "Akamai" set xlabel "date" set xdata time set timefmt "%d-%m-%Y" set format x "%d/%m\n%Y" set xtics 86400 set nomxtics set ylabel "Total Petitions (%)" set yrange [95:100] set style data linespoints set grid set key right bottom set output 'user1847844.png' ...


2

The locale settings determine how numbers and dates in tic labels are formatted, e.g. set locale 'de_DE.utf8' or set locale 'German_Germany.1252' depending on your system.


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Here's how to do it in two steps: IMG_LIST="cloud.png sun.png" X="" Y="" IMG="" storedata(x,y,index_img)= \ (X=X.sprintf(" %f",x), \ Y=Y.sprintf(" %f",y), \ IMG=IMG." ".word(IMG_LIST,int(index_img)),y) plot '-' using 1:(storedata($1,$2,$3)) 0.5 23 2 1.5 ...


0

In case the point(s) you want to plot are not characterized by the line number, but by some value in one column, you can use this trick in using : plot '-' using (($1==0)?$1:1/0):2 with points -1 1 0 2 1 3 e This can be used to plot e.g. only points with a positive x-coordinate (change to ($1>=0)?$1:1/0), or also, using the $0 pseudo-column which ...


1

You have to filter out. In gnuplot this is done with the keyword every. Since you do not provide the file you want to plot here is a possible hint based on this datafile data.dat: 10 62 11 95 12 74 13 33 14 70 youplot the point at the third line (12,74) like this: plot 'data.dat' every ::2::2 w p based on the file structure, this might vary. Maybe ...


0

set xtics will work ok if you set the number of seconds to the average number of seconds in a month. I worked this out by assuming 365.2425 days in the average year, dividing by 12 to find the average days per month (approximately 30.4), multiplying by hours per day then seconds per hour, i.e: 365.2425 / 12 * 24 * 3600 = 2629746 Assuming your data was ...


0

By tweaking and using Vagobertos well-explained code (because the code didn't work for me) and doing further readings, my code is as follows: GNUPlot Code: #!/usr/bin/gnuplot -persist reset dataname = 'myfile.csv' set datafile separator ',' # Get STATS_sum (sum of column 2) and STATS_records stats dataname u 2 noout # Define angles and percentages ...


2

Use rgb variable. With black as the no-signal colour, this gives: set view map; set size square set xlabel "delta mu Al" set ylabel "delta mu Mn" set zlabel "fraction atomique" set isosample 100 Fe(x,y)=x*y Al(x,y)=(1-x)*y Mn(x,y)=x*(1-y) set multiplot layout 2,2 set title "Fer" set palette defined (0 "black", 1 "red") splot [0:1][0:1] "++" u ...


0

Try nonuniform matrix instead of splot and pm3d map: set multiplot set size 1,1 unset colorbox plot[0:3][0:2] '-' nonuniform matrix with image 12 0 1 2 3 0 5 4 8 9 1 6 4 7 8 2 5 6 2 4 e e set size 1,1 plot[0:3][0:2] '-' w p ps 5 lw 4 notitle 2 1.2 2.5 1.2 2.5 1.5 e unset multiplot


2

In this case it's probably best to use the epslatex terminal so that you can use full latex capabilities: s(x) = 1./sqrt(2.*pi) * exp(-x**2/2.) set term epslatex standalone header '\usepackage{amsmath}' set output 'plot.tex' set xlabel '$r$' set ylabel 'WF amplitude' plot s(x) title '$\langle 1s | r \rangle \langle r | 1s \rangle$' And just run latex or ...


3

Use Symbol no. 361! E.g.: set label '|1,0{/Symbol \361}' at 1,2 (or xlabel, or title ect...)


0

I am not sure that you can compress into one plotting format, but you can use replot (or replot-like plot): plot '/root/temp.txt' using 2:xtic(1) notitle, '' u ($0):2:3 with labels notitle Empty '' induce reuse the last input(file). Now, it equals with '/root/temp.txt' To be nicer: plot 'temp.txt' using 2:xtic(1) notitle, '' u ($0+0.1):($2+1):3 with ...


0

The trick here for me was to remember to use timecolumn() when doing math for x-axis (binning). set xdata time set timefmt "[%Y-%m-%y %H:%M:%S" binwidth = 30 #30 second bin bin(x,width) = width*floor(x/width) plot "testdata.log" using (bin(timecolumn(1),binwidth)):(1.0) smooth frequency with boxes The above example sums occurrences within given binwidth ...


1

Gnuplot supports unicode in modern versions. If the terminal you are interfacing with it through supports unicode, you can just enter the unicode character directly (different os's will use a different method for doing that). Provided the font you are using in the png terminal supports the character, it will appear in the final plot. On windows, this ...


0

Without using the latex terminal, it appears to be not possible using the bitmap terminals. The closest you can get is to use the enhanced text mode and entering a "square root" character. However, you can not directly enter the Unicode code point, directly or using utf8 encoding. Instead, check out that table, it appears that it can be produced with the ...


3

Gnuplot tries to find file in current folder. If you launch gnuplot via terminal then the current folder will be current for gnuplot too. Inside gnuplot you can change path with cd 'path/to/datafiledir'. To see current directory inside gnuplot you can use pwd


1

Resize your output .png a thinner one! (e.g. 500x300) Use wider bars! (e.g. 50000) Use xrange/yrange or plot [<xmin>:<xmax>][<ymin>:<ymax>] Improve your solution 'self-automatic' with GP_VAL-s, like the code bellow: set terminal pngcairo size 500, 300 set grid set tics font ", 10" set boxwidth 50000 set style fill solid set format ...


0

Updating to Gnuplot 5.0.3 solved the problem (it seems that is a bug in 4.6.3). Thank you Gavin Portwood!


1

You can plot the file several times using plots for-loop. Each time, you only regard x values where column one fits the loop variable (check help ternary operator): set decimalsign "," set xdata time set format x "%Y-%M-%D" plot for [cat in "a b c d"] datafile using ($1 eq cat ? $2 : NaN):3 Gnuplot cannot connect the points (e.g. with linespoints) if ...


0

I used Perl to reformat the input for gnuplot. #! /bin/bash input=$1 tmp=$(mktemp) perl -aF'/\|/' \ -ne 'print "\n\n" if $last ne $F[0] && $. > 2; $last = $F[0]; $F[-1] =~ s/,/./; print "@F" if $. > 1; ' "$input" > "$tmp" categories=($( cut -f1 -d\| "$input" | uniq )) { cat <<EOF set ...


1

The post you cited already suggested a way to place the labels and percentage values. Let me explain the steps, point by point, to achieve this goal. At the end I write the full script. Q3: How can I place the value on the chart? Each slice is defined within two angles (Ai,Af). The percentage values should be placed in the middle of each one, at ...


1

There are two ways to do this, I'm not sure which you were asking about. 1) If you want to interpolate your data on a uniform grid then you'd use dgrid3d: http://gnuplot.sourceforge.net/docs_4.2/node177.html Some examples are shown here: http://www.gnuplot.info/demo/dgrid3d.html 2) If you want all your lines to intersect with lines without a uniform grid, ...


1

If you want to append an existing set loadpath path1:path2:... you have to set the GNUPLOT_LIB environment variable which is always appended to the loadpath. As far as I know this is the only way to replicate the behavior you're looking for. You can debug with show loadpath. See: http://gnuplot.sourceforge.net/gnuplot_cvs.pdf


2

Solution 1 Use grep --colors=always <pattern>, it uses grep default color highlighting. > gnuplot5 -e "set term dumb 70 20; plot 'file1' pt '@'" | grep --color=always '@' Solution 2 Use colout <pattern> <color>. It has the ability to select the color but a python library has to be installed (pip install colout). > ...


-1

Your ternary statements are trying to do too much. When you are writing f0(x)=(x_low < x <= x_high) ? y : 0 you should be writing f0(x)=((x_low < x) && ( x <= x_high)) ? y : 0 So your function f(x) should look like f(x)=(x<=300) ? 1.05 : (x<=650) ? 0.65 : (x<=1300) ? 0.46 : (x<=1950) ? 0.4 : (x<=3250) ? 0.31 : ...


2

There are basically two approaches you can take. The best approach is to use a datafile, but you can use functions, although it will be more difficult. Datafile Approach You are probably going to have trouble doing this as a function, because you are going to get those vertical lines. A datafile gives you a little better control, and even allows you to ...


0

If the problem it's a file ending with CR, you can filter those by plotting through a pipe: plot '< tr "\r" "\n" < data.dat' On the other hand, I tested CRLF and gnuplot understands those. p.s. That's a shame that excel uses CR: that was used on mac os 9...


0

AD1: the correct way to set tics font size is set tics font "name{,<size>}" eg. set tics font "Helvetica,10" AD2: set tics font resizes only the fonts of x-y axes. To resize all the fonts (eg. the title) use set terminal png size 1280, 480 font "Helvetica,30" (or any other fontname and/or size :o) )


0

Gnuplot first uses the expression on your data. Limiting the range is the second step, so in this case the logarithm of the required data points have to be in the xrange. AND don't forget: logscale uses the logarithm based on 10 but log(x) or log($1) means logaritm based on 'e' (approx. 2.7183). To be harmonic with the logscale use function log10(x) (or ...


2

For the first one use set colorbox user origin screen 0, screen 0.05 size screen XX, screen YY Where you need to set XX and YY to fit the desired colorbox width and heigh of the three plots. Then for the second two plots, just set unset colorbox


2

You can use system call which works fairly well depending on platform and compiler. For example you can call from fortran, call system("mencoder mf://frame_%09d.png -mf fps=30 -ovc lavc -o my_video.avi")


0

Following Miguel advice, here is what you should try (remember to have EOF starting the line, any space before it would make it irrelevant): gnuplot -persist <<"EOF" set xlabel "time (seconds)" set ylabel "Segments (cwnd, ssthresh)" plot "./cubic.out" using 1:7 title "snd_cwnd cubic", \ "./cubic.out" using 1:($8>=2147483647 ? 0 : $8) title ...


1

You need to use the value function (see help value). The value function accepts a string and returns the value of the variable whose name is that string. For example a1 = 2 a2 = 3 a3 = 1 plot for[i=1:3] x**value(sprintf("a%d",i)) t sprintf("a%d",i) produces Here, for each value of i, we built up the name of a variable with sprintf("a%d",i) which ...


-1

To convert a string to a float, you have the real function: my_val=2.3 my_str=sprintf("%f",my_val) print my_str # this is a string print real(my_str) # this is a float from help real: The real(x) function returns the real part of its argument. if x is a string function (i.e. function which returns the name of a variable) you need to use on it the ...


0

I'm not sure I understood completely your problem, so this might just be an hint. Imagine you have a file data.dat like this: 0.2 2.2 3.4 2.4 1.5 7.6 7.1 2.0 a function like this: f(x,a)=x*a can be plotted using the a values from data.dat like this: data=system("cat data.dat") plot for [i=0:words(data)] f(x,real(word(data,i))) title word(data,i) ...


1

This can be done. It will use the stats command extensively, and a temporary file. In gnuplot 5, the temporary file can be created in memory using a named data block (see help datablocks). Additionally, as your plot command is largely repetitive, you can use the plot for syntax plot for[in=0:2] 'file' i in u 1:2 w lines t columnheader(1) which will ...


1

I'm posting here an alternative. Although I usually prefer the animated gif as Karl answers, sometimes too big gifs are difficult to rented and especially for very long movies, they tend to create unresponsive applications (browser or slide presentations). Basically you write to a file every frame and then create a movie. In this link you have both ...



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