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34

I think ObjC has been isolated to the Apple world through a quirk of history and the nature of proprietary systems. First, you need to separate ObjC from Cocoa. ObjC is a very primitive language. I think it is a very elegant language, but it is extremely basic. You can implement ObjCv1 in a C pre-processor. C++ and ObjC were developed about the same time. C+...


25

The reason for the linking error is most likely due to the behaviour of linker to link the libraries only after seeing the symbols in compilation prior to linking the library. As h.m appears after -lgnustep-base the library is not linked as the symbols in library are not yet encountered. You can either instruct the linker to link the libraries even if the ...


24

Contrary to Outis's answer, Objective-C was not originally developed at NeXT. NeXT adopted Objective-C as the language of choice in the mid to late '80s. Objective-C was created by Brad Cox and Tom Love at Stepstone in the early '80s. Of relevance to the question, when Cox and Love created Objective-C, one of their primary goals was to build a language ...


19

I would implement the core business logic in C and take the time to write GUI wrappers native To each platform's code -- Objective-C /Cocoa and GTK/gnome or whatever.


16

Thanks @Vlad the Impala I am updating your answers for people who use OS X v10.6+ // Create the File Open Dialog class. NSOpenPanel* openDlg = [NSOpenPanel openPanel]; // Enable the selection of files in the dialog. [openDlg setCanChooseFiles:YES]; // Multiple files not allowed [openDlg setAllowsMultipleSelection:NO]; // Can't select a directory [openDlg ...


16

Well, there is also the GNUStep framework that some people still develop for. I don't know how active that community is, however. But for the most part Objective-C is now an Apple language, as illustrated by the fact that the "2.0" version of the language was launched as part of OSX 10.5 and seems to have been a purely in-house development effort at Apple. ...


15

In case someone else needs this answer, here it is: int i; // Create the File Open Dialog class. NSOpenPanel* openDlg = [NSOpenPanel openPanel]; // Enable the selection of files in the dialog. [openDlg setCanChooseFiles:YES]; // Multiple files not allowed [openDlg setAllowsMultipleSelection:NO]; // Can't select a directory [openDlg ...


12

I think you'd be better off porting a Mac application than an iOS application. While the iOS frameworks (UIKit mostly) are close to those of Mac OS, they are still quite different. Beyond the code differences there are HUGE paradigm shifts between iOS and Mac, in the limited screen space and the lack of a mouse. GNUstep is close to Cocoa, so you'd be able ...


12

This is a few months late, but the answer is yes; GNUstep will support Objective-C 2.0 features (as well as blocks). Currently, everything is more or less implemented, but needs testing and debugging. These features require Clang rather than gcc, and currently you need to use the trunk version. See David Chisnall's explanation in this thread for more ...


11

Objective-C has also been popular in the scientific and financial services communities. There are still many Objective-C based applications deployed in banking, mostly on the trading analysis front. A friend works on a nearly million line of code Objective-C based analysis and trading engine for which they have written their own class hierarchy from ...


10

Have a look here. It seems like one needs a bunch of parameters to the compile command.


10

@Stephen: I'm constantly surprised at how people never read our website or even check on the progress of the project before saying things like this. :) GNUstep follows Cocoa closely now and we're so much more than OpenStep at this point. If you, or others, want to have a real opinion on the subject get GNUstep from SVN, install it and try it out. ...


10

It is - NSLog(@"hello world"); not NSlog(@"hello world"); // 'l' should be upper case in NSLog Try this - gcc -o hello hello.m -I /usr/lib/GNUstep/System/Library/Headers \ -L /usr/lib/GNUstep/System/Library/Libraries/ -lgnustep-base \ -fconstant-string-class=NSConstantString How to compile objective c programs using gcc


8

You'll need to link to libobjc. The fix is pretty simple; just compile with: gcc h.m `gnustep-config --objc-flags` -lobjc -lgnustep-base -o hello


8

The problem is that when you compile it as C++, the compiler mangles the name of the symbol NSApplicationMain, so it can't find it, since it's looking for something like __Z17NSApplicationMainiPPKc. You can use the nm program (from binutils) to see what symbols the object files are referencing: $ # When compiled as Objective-C: $ nm main.o | grep ...


7

Like MKroehnert and puzzle said, neither LLVM Clang nor GCC actually come with a set of frameworks. GCC comes with only a small runtime that doesn't provide NSArray, NSString, not even NSObject. Frameworks are provided by, for example: GNUstep Cocotron Cocoa ObjFW ObjFW is the lightest of them all, but on any UNIX, I'd recommend you go the GNUstep route....


6

LLVM Clang is a compiler. It is completely independent from the Cocoa / Cocoa Touch frameworks on OS X / iOS, or any other frameworks or platform, for that matter.


6

mutableArrayValueForKey does not return "array", it returns a proxy for "array." You can see this if you print out the classes: NSLog(@"%@", [self.array class]); NSLog(@"%@", [[self valueForKey:@"array"] class]); NSLog(@"%@", [[self mutableArrayValueForKey:@"array"] class]); This prints: 2010-02-24 20:06:44.258 Untitled[25523:a0f] NSCFArray 2010-02-24 20:...


6

You're getting that error because GNUStep can't find the compiler. You need to also install the developer package (GNUStep Devel).


6

Adam nailed the problem you reported, you have a typo in the class name. However, there are a few other problems you'll run into that I figure it would help to know about. Your method breaks several Objective-C conventions that will make your code less readable and confuse people trying to help you, namely: Anonymous selector fragments are never a good ...


6

Try using NSAutoreleasePool instead of NSAutoReleasePool (with a lowercase r).


6

Its not the only way but GNUStep worked for me. For a good writeup on setting it up look here. Note: Your exact error is listed about halfway down that page. Your missing package seems to be 'gobjc'.


6

GNUstep is actually much more active than most people think it is, and very worth keeping an eye on. It's not hard to create apps that work across GNUstep and Cocoa (meaning potentially on OSX, Win, Linux, BSD...) These links are definitely worth checking out for anyone interested in the topic: http://www.gnu.org/software/gnustep/information/aboutGNUstep....


6

I do the same thing. Rename c:\mingw\mwingw32 to c:\mingw\mingw32old and it works (Windows XP). In Windows 7 64-bit I have not had this problem.


6

The GNUSTEP_MAKEFILES variable needs to be set to point to the directory that has that commmon.make file in it. K


6

What sort of software are you trying to create? The most likely answer is C/C++.


6

I would recommend Objective-C for portability and ease of use. You don't get to use Cocoa if you want to run on Linux, but Objective-C is a really nice language and it let's you easily interface with regular C code.


6

Consider using Python. You can write applications that are native in appearance on both platforms with wxPython. Python comes with Max OS X and Ubuntu desktop and your application can be packaged to look and behave like any other native application on either platform.


6

try to run this command line in your command. it worked for me. gcc -I"c:/GNUstep/GNUstep/System/Library/Headers" -L "c:/GNUstep/GNUstep/System/Library/Libraries" -o hello helloWorld.m -lobjc -lgnustep-base -fconstant-string-class=NSConstantString


5

The signature of objc_msgSend() is: id objc_msgSend(id self, SEL op, ...); Every method call is compiled down to a call to this function. I.e., if you call: [anArray objectAtIndex:42]; That will be compiled as if it were: objc_msgSend(anArray, @selector(objectAtIndex:), 42); Now, to your question, why do methods get compiled down to a function that ...



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