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8

I would try boost::spirit. It is often extreamly fast (even for parsing simple things like an integer it can be faster than the C function atoi http://alexott.blogspot.com/2010/01/boostspirit2-vs-atoi.html) http://boost-spirit.com/home/ It has nice things : header only, so dependency hell, liberal licence. However be warned that the learning curve is ...


8

Parsing really consists of two phases. The first is "lexing", which convert the raw strings of character in to something that the program can more readily understand (commonly called tokens). Simple example, lex would convert: if (a + b > 2) then In to: IF_TOKEN LEFT_PAREN IDENTIFIER(a) PLUS_SIGN IDENTIFIER(b) GREATER_THAN NUMBER(2) RIGHT_PAREN ...


4

They are ambiguous because they both contain the same sub-set {CR}{LF} | {CR} | {LF}. Given the input {CR}{LF} the parser has no way to tell which terminal it should match. A table-driven parser isn't really designed to handle "special cases" directly. If you want to ignore new-lines in some contexts, but attribute meaning to them in others then you'll ...


4

I think the grammar is ambiguous in the sense that both Whitespace and MyNewLine match new line charachters. Since it throws a wobbly doing it your way, I suggest detecting whitespace and new lines separately and deciding what to do with the newline on a case by case basis. I am not too experienced in the area, but thats what I remember from my Theory Of ...


4

If the grammar to be parsed is simple, you might just write the parser by hand. Most parser generators are designed to make it easy to whip up a working parser, and execution time often suffers as a result.


3

The best performance I have seen in parsing came from Boost.Spirit.Qi which expresses the grammar in C++ using meta-template programming. It is not for the faint of heart though. This will need be well insulated, and the compilation time of the file containing the parser will increase to several seconds (so better make sure there is as few as possible ...


3

Apart from generating "cgt" output file, Gold Builder has also XML output capability. If you feel comfortable with XML processing, I suggest you to extract the keywords using XML as one possible solution (See documentation). Here is a sample grammar XML file : <?GOLDParserTables version="1.0"?> <Tables> <Parameters> ...


3

below are some changes i would request to change for better performance 1) make the grammar left recursive rules. this is better in terms of making shift reduce operations as gold parser is a shift reduce LR parser. SectionList ::= Section | SectionList Section PropertyList ::= Property | PropertyList Property 2) third rule ...


3

If you really want to do incremental parsing, consider this paper by Tim Wagner. It is brilliant scheme to keep existing parse trees around, shuffling mixtures of string fragments at the points of editing and parse trees representing the parts of the source text that hasn't changed, and reintegrating the strings into the set of parse trees. It is done ...


2

I would recommend antlr.org for information and the 'free' tool I would use for any parser use.


2

The error that you're getting is: Reduce-Reduce Conflict '?' can follow more than one completed rule. A Reduce-Reduce error is a caused when a grammar allows two or more rules to be reduced at the same time, for the same token. The grammar is ambigious. Please see the documentation for more information. It's saying that after it's evaluated some ...


2

I've used the Calitha C# Engine. Let me know (by posting a comment to this answer) if you still want an answer, which I can answer using my knowledge of this C# engine. My question is how do i implement my body? (is there another skeleton you prefer), are there any other downloads i overlooked? The Calitha Engine download includes source for the ...


2

If the syntax of your expression is simple enough, consider making a hand-written recursive descent parser. It can run really fast, and give you the ability (with enough care) to report nicely and specifically syntax errors. You could also use bison, but I believe a hand-written recursive parser would probably go faster. And you can do lexing with a flex ...


1

Remember that the parser generator is building an LALR(1) parser, which means that the parser needs to be able to decide while scanning the input left-to-right (LR) whether to reduce an already-completed production or to shift a token which might form part of a not-already-completed production, looking only at the next (1) tokens (which is the token which ...


1

To make this simple, you should work on a 2 ways solutions. In the frontend, do not show price ($_product->getPrice()) but just show the real price according to weight. Example if you have price/grm stored in the backend use $product->getWeight * Mage::getStoreConfig('mycompany/gold/dayprice'). That way price will be shown dynamically in the product page ...


1

I don't think capturing the REM comment with a lexical group is possible. I think you need to define a new terminal like this: Remark = 'REM' ({Printable} - '}')* This however means, that you need to be able to handle this new terminal in your productions... Eg. From: <CurlyStatement> ::= '{' <Statement> '}' To: <CurlyStatement> ...


1

I found another engine, which is looks like actively developed - http://www.semitwist.com/goldie/ But it requires D2. Believe to this - http://forum.dlang.org/post/jc0ic5$18bv$2@digitalmars.com - using D1 now is not a good idea. Hope this helps.


1

I've written many parsers, and hand-coded recursive-descent is the way I do it. They are easy to write and pretty much optimal. That said, if speed is what you're after, no matter what you write there will be plenty of room to speed it up. These will be in ways that could surprise you, because anything you could think of, you would have already done. ...


1

Instead of expr make you grammar recognize sequence-of-expr. EDIT: Instead of having (bison syntax): start: expr { process_expr ($1); } ; have: start: expr_seq ; expr_seq: expr { process_expr ($1); } | expr_seq expr { process_expr ($2); } ;


1

According to the grammar, the first line could be a <Func Proto>, if it was terminated by a semicolon: <Func Proto> ::= <Func ID> '(' <Types> ')' ';' | <Func ID> '(' <Params> ')' ';' | <Func ID> '(' ')' ';' For parsing a function declaration, this production from the quoted grammar ...


1

You could go like this: Find the last $ sign Look for the beginning of the "bets " substring that should be before that The player name is the substring before that position. No need to get into some complicated parser, do it by hand if the format is just that.


1

They can both be used (ANTLR or Goldparser). But if the format is so simple (USERNAME ACTION ... AMOUNT), then I see no need for a full-blown parser: mind as well process the file line by line and split on white spaces.


1

I'd first look for an existing VBScript parser instead of writing your own, which is not a trivial task! Theres a VBScript grammar in BNF format on this page: http://rosettacode.org/wiki/BNF_Grammar which you can translate into a ANTLR (or some other parser generator) grammar. Before trying to do fancy things like re-parsing only a part of the source, I ...


1

GOLD can be used for any kind of application where you have to apply context-free grammars to input. elaboration: Essentially, CFGs apply to all programming languages. So if you wanted to develop a scripting language for your company, you'd need to write a parser- or get a parsing program. Alternatively, if you wanted to have a semi-natural language for ...



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