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3

It comes out that you can pass a "folder" name with a bucket name into .withGoogleStorageBucketName() method, like: UploadOptions uploadOptions = UploadOptions.Builder .withGoogleStorageBucketName("bucket_name/folder_name");


3

You can use the Cloud Storage client library. Instead of open() use cloudstorage.open() (or gcs.open() if importing cloudstorage as gcs, as in the above-mentioned doc) and note that the full filepath starts with the GCS bucket name (as a dir). More details in the cloudstorage.open() documentation.


3

You can use gsutil and write a script which can run at intervals to upload/sync To upload: https://cloud.google.com/storage/docs/gsutil/commands/cp#description gsutil cp *.txt gs://my-bucket For sync: https://cloud.google.com/storage/docs/gsutil/commands/rsync gsutil rsync -d -r data gs://mybucket/data For your use case, sync up to one of the buckets ...


2

here is the blog to resize the image This is the sample PHP code but how to make it working in FireBase you need to refer the link below click here to read more index.php: <?php //var_dump($_FILES['uploaded_files']['tmp_name']); syslog(LOG_WARNING, "Request came"); require_once 'google/appengine/api/cloud_storage/CloudStorageTools.php'; use ...


2

No, that's not available at this time.


2

Sure. Via console you can use gsutil command in this way. You just should install gsutil command. Via api rest you can use this service. You can try this api here. Also thre are libraries to python, java or other languajes. From @MikeSchwartz suggestion. Using cloud console, you can manage your objects manually. Link. Update 2: example on NodeJS We ...


2

You can either: a) Create a download url through the firebase console b) if you attempt to get the downloadurl programmatically from a firebase client, one will be created on the fly for you.


2

Based on your update, it sounds like your object was cached. See the note about Cache Control and Consistency in the documentation.


2

According to the documentation, Google has provided a Google Cloud Client Library. The java doc of this library provides following sample code to make batch requests using a single RPC request: StorageBatch batch = storage.batch(); BlobId firstBlob = BlobId.of("bucket", "blob1")); BlobId secondBlob = BlobId.of("bucket", "blob2")); batch.delete(firstBlob)....


2

I recommend using the official GCloud client, and then you can use getSignedURL() to get a download URL to the file, like so: bucket.file(filename).getSignedURL({ action: 'read', expires: '03-17-2025' }, function(err, url) { if (err) { console.error(err); return; } // The file is now available to read from this URL. request(url, ...


2

There is a GAE issue causing exactly this behaviour introduced in SDK version 1.9.37, see "ImportError: No module named webapp2" after Linux SDK upgrade (1.9.35 -> 1.9.38). If your SDK version is 1.9.37 or 1.9.38 downgrade to 1.9.36, which you can find here. At least until the fix gets released.


2

See the documentation on cache control and consistency. In particular: Note: If you do not specify a cache lifetime, a publicly accessible object can be cached for up to 60 minutes. So I'm guessing this is working as intended and your object is cached. Have you tried waiting a little longer?


2

In Sharing your data publicly, it's shown that there are 2 ways to stop sharing an object publicly. Deselect the checkbox under Shared Publicly as you've mentioned already. Edit the object permissions and remove the entry with ID allUsers. The reason you are still able to access the object publicly is indeed because of caching as mentioned by @jterrace. ...


2

From https://cloud.google.com/storage/docs/json_api/v1/how-tos/upload Any MIME type of data is permitted, up to a maximum of 5 TB per file. The Firebase Storage libraries don't impose any additional size restrictions. But given that you're targeting mobile devices, I expect that there's a more realistic limit you will hit before that.


1

The easiest way to access cloud storage on Container Engine appears to be the gcloud library. It won't work with zero configuration if the App Engine SDK is installed on the container (gcloud finds it and assumes it's running on App Engine). So I stopped using the official Google container. On a python container just add gcloud to your requirements.txt (or ...


1

I realize there are 3 steps. (please let me know if I'm wrong.) download gzip files decompress gzip into json upload into BigQuery You can try yajl-ruby gem to finish the first two steps. require 'uri' require 'yajl/gzip' require 'yajl/deflate' require 'yajl/http_stream' url = URI.parse("http://example.com/foo.json") results = Yajl::HttpStream.get(...


1

This seems to be a known issue with Cloud DNS incorrectly reporting usage and affecting the billing. Google are working on resolution and reverting these changes.


1

When using the GCloud client, you want to use getSignedURL() to download the file, like so: bucket.file('photos/' + filename).getSignedURL({ action: 'read', expires: '03-17-2025' }, function(err, url) { if (err) { console.error(err); return; } // The file is now available to read from this URL. request(url, function(err, resp) { // ...


1

This is expected. The object can be cached in any of the intermediary proxy servers which you have no control over. So, setting a Cache Control header also may not solve the issue. When uploading the file, instead of saving it with the filename, you could use the md5hash of the file as the name. This would ensure if the file contents change, you will have ...


1

If you need core features and plan to run your app on App Engine, use Cloud Storage Client Library. It's easier to use (as of the time of this answer) for most basic features. If you plan to run your code outside of App Engine instances and/or need features that Google API Client Library does not support (e.g. resumable uploads), use Google Cloud Java ...


1

Compressed Avro files are not supported ... See more in Avro format


1

See the Google Cloud Storage Errors and Error Handling and Service Account docs. 403 indicates that the user was not authorized to make the request. When running on your GCE instance, I'm guessing that your code is running in a service account that has write permissions to your bucket. When running locally, you will have to provide appropriate credentials ...


1

Most optimal way will be saving to Storage Bucket, and then serve it from there. It also allows you to: prepare file from a TaskQueue job, which is not limited to 60 seconds so you can process much more data, handle errors, etc give user ability to pause/resume download, use a download manager, etc, w/o forcing your frontend to start the job from the ...


1

No. If you sign a URL specifying a "PUT" verb, you must make a PUT request. There is a way to upload objects using signatures and a POST verb, but it's not with signed URLs. It's with signed policy requests, which are a similar but more complex concept: https://cloud.google.com/storage/docs/xml-api/post-object#usage_and_examples With policy documents, you ...


1

I found the way for passing env variable to python at runtime. I have to run, $ GOOGLE_APPLICATION_CREDENTIALS="/home/gemini/Documents/foo-staging-dfab9cc17b65.json" python list_objects.py <bucket-name>


1

It appears from the --foreground --debug_fuse output that you're using credentials that aren't allowed to write to the bucket. They are probably read-only (StatObject didn't return a 403, and gcsfuse checks at startup that it can list the bucket). Try giving the docs about credentials a careful read. In particular, if you're getting credentials ...


1

Please run gcsfuse with --foreground (and perhaps --debug_fuse) to get some indication of what the error is when it happens.


1

Please try the following working example taken from the datalab sample notebooks repository. import datalab.bigquery as bq import datalab.storage as storage import pandas as pd from StringIO import StringIO # Create the schema, conveniently using a DataFrame example. %storage read --object gs://cloud-datalab-samples/cars.csv --variable cars df = pd....


1

AWS is a natural fit, the S3 uploads are free. They have a hosted ElasticSearch and Redis/ElasticCache, or you could host your own on EC2. Redis is an in-memory key value store not well suited for dynamic search, whereas ElasticSearch is a persisted document store perfectly suited for search and aggregation. If you enable S3 Events, then a file create ...


1

You can generate signatures like this with the openssl library or the command line utility usually packaged with it. So with the understanding that I have never worked with Google Cloud Platform, and am only trying to expand on their documentation, to do this by hand you'd need 1) a .pem version of your Google Cloud credentials. lets call it private.pem ...



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