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5

The NaCL is (again) supported since Go 1.3. See Golang 1.3 release notes. Obsolete answer as of Go 1.2: The NaCl will be supported in Go 1.3 reportedly: Quote from Go 1.3 Native Client Support document: Go 1.3 will include support for running command-line programs under Native Client, Google’s SFI-based execution sandbox. ...


5

The constructor that is private is not the one you want. Try casting the ciphertext to a (const char*): pp::Var var_reply(static_cast<const char*>(ciphertext)); Note that this expects a UTF8 string. If your encrypted data is not in this format (it likely isn't) this will not work properly. You probably want to send this as an ArrayBuffer instead, ...


4

The PPAPI toolchain build uses the native compiler (on Windows, this is cl.exe). This produces a shared object/DLL that will be loaded by Chrome. Unlike Native Client, it is not sandboxed. Like NaCl, it links against the ppapi library, so you can using Pepper (PPAPI) functions. Unlike NaCl and PNaCl, there are no limitations on other APIs you can use. You ...


4

NaCl is a small operating system which shims calls to the underlying operating system. The inner sandbox can't do regular syscalls (the validator enforces this), so it has to go through NaCl's trampoline syscalls which jump to trusted code that performs similar types of checking that regular operating systems would do before calling the underlying operating ...


4

There is no direct way to get a callback that a particular message was received by the NaCl module. You can do it yourself manually, however by passing along an id, and mapping ids to callbacks. Something like this (untested): var idCallbackHash = {}; var nextId = 0; function postMessageWithCallback(msg, callback) { var id = nextId++; ...


4

To install a library ported to Native Client as part of naclports you'll need to: Download and install the NaCl SDK: https://developer.chrome.com/native-client/sdk/download Set NACL_SDK_ROOT in your environment to point at the pepper_* version under the location you install it at. You may want to explicitly install the very latest version: ...


3

PNaCl currently isn't supported by Internet Explorer. You may want to try using Pepper.js or Emscripten when targeting non-Chome browsers.


3

Answering @crystal-miller's revival of this question: I'm not aware of any PHP port to NaCl, but there are plenty of ports for other languages so the following information should point you in the right direction if you do want to port PHP (or any other language) to NaCl. The NaCl team keeps a list of regression-tested ports in naclports. These are all ...


3

Yes, you can handle a mimetype from an Native Client app. See https://developer.chrome.com/apps/manifest/nacl_modules. Basically, you add this to your manifest.json: "nacl_modules": [{ "path": "NaClModule.nmf", "mime_type": "application/x-my-fancy-mimetype" }], ... When the user clicks a link to an object with this mimetype, Chrome will open a new ...


3

tl;dr: drop most of the -I includes. The C++ standard library does work with PNaCl, but not all implementations of it work! You're explicitly telling the compiler to use Visual Studio's standard library implementation (with the -I option) but you don't need to do this: by default the PNaCl compiler will link to libc++ (and we have legacy support for ...


3

There's a bit of confusion: when the documentation says "PNaCl and NaCl work on ARM", it means the part that runs inside of Chrome which users would use. The SDK is currently only built for x86-64 Windows/Linux/OSX, and not for ARM. The main reason is that it's never been requested, probably because ARM machines are quite slow compared to usual development ...


3

As others have mentioned, you're using a C-string, which must be NULL-terminated. When you call pp::VarDictionary::Set, the parameters are pp::Vars, and you're taking advantage of an implicit conversion constructor from C-string to pp::Var. If instead you make plaintext a std::string or use pp::VarArrayBuffer, this won't be necessary. PostMessage() is ...


2

The entire contents of your packaged app are available to both JavaScript and NaCl code via http requests. If you use the nacl_io library then you can also access all the files using standard POSIX file APIs by first mounting the contents of the package somewhere if your virtual filesystem: e.g: // Mount the http root at /mnt/package/ mount("/", ...


2

2013 and 2014 models support PNACL. 2013 models: only support up to pepper29 2014 models: only support up to pepper33. I hope this information help you.


2

Yes, I think the solution you've described will mostly work, though you may need to load the image using an <embed src="..." type="image/jbig2"> instead of <img>. Basically, you will: Compile the JBig2 decoder using the Native Client SDK Add the PPAPI plugin entry point. See any of the examples in the NaCl SDK, or the tutorial here. In your ...


2

As I suggested here, I believe what you are trying to do is not possible. A NaCl module can only be loaded in an embed element. The reason it works when you type it as a URL is that a HTML page is automatically created for you with an embed element that fills the page. Here is a potential workaround: modify your Chrome extension to use a content script. ...


2

See "Running a plugin in Chrome": http://www.chromium.org/developers/design-documents/pepper-plugin-implementation You need to use the --register-pepper-plugins command-line flag. Note that: Running .dll plugins is not a supported way to ship to Chrome users. It's fine for testing, but to ship your plugin to users, you need to use the NaCl or PNaCl ...


2

By default the PNaCl toolchain builds with a downloaded binary of clang because Google's automated builders run Ubuntu 12.04, and the gcc on those systems cannot build recent versions of LLVM. So there are 2 options: If you used Chromium's depot_tools to get the Native Client sources, you can easily get a copy of the same compiler the builders use: from the ...


2

For now there is no official port of Intel TBB for NaCl, and the project team at Intel (which I work in) is unaware of any unofficial one either.


2

PNaCl expects everything to be build as static libraries, not shared, though that's being worked on. For most projects the effort of targeting PNaCl will involve creating a static library build, and setting CC/CXX to pnacl-clang/pnacl-clang++. Open source projects are often already ported on naclports (and regression-tested), but it looks like leptonica ...


2

You're correct that there is no way to access WinAPi from a PPAPI plugin, and that you'll need a separate application to do that. The easiest way to communicate with a native application from a Chrome extension is Native Messaging: https://developer.chrome.com/extensions/nativeMessaging If you wish to draw on a page, you will have to use HTML. ...


2

Observations: You can't use socket APIs outside a packaged app (since there is no way to get permissions for them otherwise). A packaged app is mostly self-contained: it's not something interacting with the normal browser, it's a preset collection of resources that is displayed in a separate window. A certain website can still communicate with the app. ...


2

From a Chrome App you can use the chrome.serial Javascript API to talk to serial devices, if you've requested permission in your application manifest. https://developer.chrome.com/apps/serial There isn't currently a PPAPI serial interface available to Native Client modules, so you'd have to proxy serial output / events to the NaCl module from JavaScript via ...


2

Yes, it is guaranteed that the order of the messages is preserved. Unfortunately, I don't think our API documentation mentions this. But we've taken great pains to make sure messages arrive in order. So you can be sure that when you call postMessage and then postMessageAndAwaitResponse afterward, the NaCl side will receive the first one (with HandleMessage) ...


2

This answer is not Native Client specific. Accessing Native Client resources from another origin uses the standard CORS mechanism. To answer your question, though: This can be done by setting up the correct CORS response headers on the A.com server. There are many online resources that can describe how to do this: take a look at ...


2

There are two similarly named but quite different technologies. Native Hosts. Those are separate programs, that cannot be distributed in the Web Store, and talk to your JavaScript with Native Messaging, a variant of standard Messaging API. Native Client modules (NaCl/PNaCl). Those work like browser plugins, and they can be bundled with the extension. Note ...


2

That does seem like "a chrome/windows bug", so it could be worth filing at crbug.com (and tag with label Cr-Platform-NaCl). The chrome NaCl loading code/implementation does not actively do anything to cause the busy cursor to spin after loadend as far as I know.


2

MIPS is supported by ImgTech: the NaCl team accepts patches from them to support MIPS, and we have some tests bots, but we don't build a full MIPS toolchain and haven't done a thorough security audit (though we've done pretty extensive code review). You'll have to build the toolchain to get MIPS support. You'll want to run ...


2

pnacl-bccompress compresses a .pexe file. .nexe files are either x86-32, x86-64, ARM or MIPS, and compressing these is trickier and probably not the best approach. Instead I suggest playing with LLVM's command-line options to generate smaller bitcode files, which will result in smaller .nexe files. First, run pnacl-clang with --pnacl-driver-verbose to see ...


2

Yes, you can add a platform specific section to your manifest.json. Then the packages will only download the components that are specified for that CPU architecture. There is documentation for that feature here: https://developer.chrome.com/native-client/devguide/distributing#reducing-the-size-of-the-user-download-package And there is an example in the SDK ...



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