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17

So after some research, here is what I found - a solution acceptable by the major search providers: google , yahoo & msn (I could on find a validator here) : User-Agent: * Disallow: /* Allow: /?okparam= Allow: /$ The trick is using the $ to mark the end of URL.


13

These errors are coming from the way GoogleBot formats its HTTP_ACCEPT header. While valid (see W3 reference), it adds a q=0.6 (last figure may change) which is used as a separator. Since there is no other media type specified, this q=0.6 is not necessary and I assume this is why Rails doesn't treat the header correctly. (It seems to depend on Rails ...


12

The javascript created by cfajaxproxy includes the location of the cfc. Viewing the source of your page you should be able to find the string '/baseCFC/Statement.cfc'. That is how Google is finding them. A quick way to get Google to ignore them is to modify your robots.txt file to exclude the baseCFC "directory". User-Agent: * Disallow: /baseCFC/


11

The reason why they are ignored is that you have the fully qualified URL in the robots.txt file while the specification doesn't allow it. (You should only specify relative paths, or absolute paths using /). Try the following: Sitemap: /sitemap_index.xml User-agent: Mediapartners-Google Disallow: /scripts User-agent: * Disallow: /scripts # list of articles ...


11

Although Google has its servers spread across the whole world, it would be quite hard to say where the search engine's bots mostly originate from. What I suggest would be to block the IP ranges but add an exclusion clause that matches against the User-Agent for search bots like: SetEnvIfNoCase User-Agent (googlebot|bingbot|yahoo!\sslurp) is_search_bot ...


9

I've dealt with this exact scenario for a large ecommerce site and Google essentially ignored the site. Google considers it cloaking and addresses it directly here and says: Cloaking refers to the practice of presenting different content or URLs to users and search engines. Serving up different results based on user agent may cause your site to be ...


8

If your search form's method is get instead of post, each search has its own url, and people might be posting those urls elsewhere. Or if you have a (possibly inadvertently) publicly accessible webstats page that listed those urls, that's another common way for search engines to stumble upon your internal search urls. A third way I've seen is sites that list ...


8

You shouldn't accept a GET request for any action that modifies data (voting, editing a post, etc.). Your voting should be done via a POST request, which Googlebot won't perform. More information in this SO post: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/46585/when-do-you-use-post-and-when-do-you-use-get


7

if ( strpos( $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'], 'Googlebot' ) !== false ) { file_put_contents('somefile.txt', 'Googlebot was here - ' . date(DATE_RFC822)); } http://php.net/manual/en/function.file-put-contents.php http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.date.php


6

Use the following link in your head to advertise the other language. An example for the french homepage: <link rel="alternate" hreflang="en" href="/?lang=en"> Otherwise Google cannot know and will only index one language (from my experience) See: http://support.google.com/webmasters/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=189077


5

Currently the best technique for making an RIA indexable by search engines is called progressive enhancement (or graceful degradation, depending on which way you see it). Basically you create a simple HTML version of the application using the same data as the application loads. This version should be dynamically generated by some kind of backend server ...


5

Google will find your website on its own if some existing website has a link to it. You can jump-start the process: http://www.google.com/addurl/. You may also be interested in Google's Webmaster Tools.


5

If the page is gone with no logical replacement then you should normally return a 404 error, in this case however I would consider returning 410 Gone - which indicates that the page has been permanently removed never to return and should be purged from googles indices. Its probably worth greping your existing codebase for the url's in question to ensure ...


5

Change this line: echo "Googlebot last access = ".googlebot_lastaccess($domain_name)."<br />"; with this: $content = googlebot_lastaccess($domain_name); $date = substr($content , 0, strpos($content, 'GMT') + strlen('GMT')); echo "Googlebot last access = ".$date."<br />";


5

I am also getting the same, I did some investigation and came to the conclusion it is a 'bug' in Rails. */*;q=0.9 is the value of the HTTP accept parameter. I'm not exactly sure what is going on, but in Rails 3.0 this works. In Rails 3.1 it returns a 500 response, and in Rails 3.2 it returns a 406 response. Update: There is an open bug regarding this ...


5

Googlebot actively tries to avoid sessions and does not support cookies. From First date with the Googlebot: Headers and compression (March 2008) I usually avoid cookies (so no "Cookie:" header) since I don't want the content affected too much by session-specific info. And, if a server uses a session id in a dynamic URL rather than a cookie, I can ...


5

503 means the service is temporarily unavailable so it is appropriate to use while the server is overloaded. http://www.w3.org/Protocols/rfc2616/rfc2616-sec10.html The Wikipedia article defines 269 as the initial response for a request that must be processed asynchronously. 269 means the request added something to the server's "queue" of things to do and ...


5

If you're looking to paginate within movie categories, you might make use of this hierarchy: Home > Movies > Action An optimal URL structure might be: www.domain.com/movies/action Using the page query parameter to paginate is perfectly search engine friendly. Page 1: www.domain.com/movies/action Page 2: www.domain.com/movies/action?page=2 Page 3: ...


5

Normally Google crawls the page that's redirected to. Two possible explanations for the site you saw: The site just showed a 301 message instead of returning HTTP-headers properly. The site redirected to another 301, which redirected to another 301, ... Watch this video on Youtube.


4

I tested your robots.txt against my own domain (which has a sitemap entry for every page) and Googlebot and Googlebot-Mobile returned that they were Disallowed access. Based on this - I would say the robots.txt file takes precedence over any sitemaps. Plus, logically speaking - if you block the entire domain, the bot is disallowed access to the sitemap. ...


4

Google already indexes flash content so my suggestion would be to check how your site is being indexed. Maybe you don't have to do anything. I don't think showing an alternate version of the site is good from a Google perspective.


4

There's alot of discussion regarding Google's crawling policy. The best you can do is check your logs and determine what their schedule is for your site. As for the multiple entries in the cache, Google has no way of knowing that they aren't the same page; they have different URLs and possibly different data. If you want a specific page to be used, try ...


4

The official advice seems to be: offer a visible link to a non-flash version of the site. Fooling the googlebot is a surefire way to get in trouble. And remember, Google results will link to the matching page! Do not make useless results.


4

Use a robots.txt to point out links that bots shouldn't follow. For example, put the following in http://example.com/robots.txt User-Agent: * Disallow: /vote.php You can read more about robots.txt here: http://www.robotstxt.org/ Google and every other well-behaved bot will read and follow directions in robots.txt. If you also have problems with bots not ...


4

Besides having to wait, because Google's index updates take some time, also note that if you have other sites linking to your site, robots.txt alone won't be sufficient to remove your site. Quoting Google's support page "Remove a page or site from Google's search results": If the page still exists but you don't want it to appear in search results, use ...


4

The solution to the problem is to specify the format in your action. Up until now, I had simply had the following in my index action def index end Once I inserted a respond_to block def index respond_to do |format| format.html end end I stopped getting the missing template errors.


4

Those addresses are in a private network - not in any private, they are in your own network. If you're using a cloud provider like amazon this can be the machine of any other amazon customer in the same zone. Are you running your website on Amazon Webservices? If so I have some more tips. Either way you should block this IP addresses at your firewall like ...


3

An educated guess is Python. They employ the creator of it. However, I can imagine that their crawler probably is a distributed app that takes advantage of MapReduce, in which case it might actually be a C/C++ application. This is besides the point, though. You can write an efficient web-crawler in many different languages and still get the same result. A ...


3

From a web-development perspective this non-random crawling pattern can give unexpected consequences; such as non-random load patterns if one specific URL-length corresponds to one type of particularly heavy transaction, etc. if you have transaction pages accessible to search engine bots, then i call it fail. search engine bots shouldn't ...


3

register at google webmaster tools, verify your site and throttle google bot down submit a sitemap read the google guildelines: (if-Modified-Since HTTP header) use robot.txt to restrict access from to bot to some parts of the website make a script that changes the robot.txt each $[period of time] to make sure the bot is never able to crawl too many pages ...



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