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The implementation of RestfulController has a method getObjectToBind() which returns the request object. I would suggest to override this method and give back a map that contains the key itemId as described in the comment of this method. The other alternative could be, to send the itemId in the http json body. This is a little redundant, because the ...


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Better declare the data source in your bean (Service, Controller...) to be injected (no need to depend from Hibernate here) def dataSource and use it directly: Sql sql = new Sql(dataSource) If you have multiple data sources, just follow the naming convention def dataSource_foo


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As stated in the docs, it does not work like written. You have to add static belongsTo = [airport:Airport] to Flight. Without belongsTo you get the following error: Default sort for associations [Airport->flights] are not supported with unidirectional one to many relationships. With belongsTo the test could look like this: class SortSpec extends ...


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I found that the grails documentation says to put embedded class definitions either the same source file as the domain class or put it into src/groovy. I put Address.groovy in src/groovy and generated the UI for my Family class, which has an embedded object. The generated create page now works and the address fields are included in the Family page. "The ...


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I resolved, but not using criteria. I used HQL: def authors = Author.findAll("\ SELECT * FROM author AS a \ WHERE \ (SELECT COUNT(b.id) \ FROM a.books AS b \ WHERE b.releaseDate > '2014-01-01' \ ) = 0")


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You could use grails.gorm.default.mapping for this, and you can find documentation here and here


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Are you looking for something like this?... def idToSearchFor = indivRecord.uniqueId AccountRecord.where { idToSearchFor in owners }.list() I can't tell for sure without seeing your model but something like that may help.


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Wasn't able to get this working via BuildConfig.groovy, but manually downloading into /lib did the trick. However, be warned...unless you've manually changed your Grails project to use JPA instead of Hibernate, this plugin will do you no good.


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@Dinh Nhat, your setter method looks wrong because you put a primitive type there again and it should be: public void setClient_os_id(Integer clientOsId) { client_os_id = clientOsId; }


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Something like this should work for you; it may be a little slow due to the sorting, however if your number of books is relatively small, it shouldn't have a huge impact. def targetDate = // define your date here. def lazyAuthors = Author.findAll{ books.sort{it.requestDate}[books.size()-1] > targetDate } **EDIT** It turns out you can't query ...


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How i have asked Grails generate "findBy..." into Domain Model, Grails generate "findBy..." methods to fields into domain model. In you case - Event.findByAuthor(id)


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Unless I'm completely missing something in your question: How to I create the above Map as json data type in postgresql? Just create table with an id column and a column of type json: create table lab_result ( id bigint not null primary key, results json ); insert into lab_result (id, results) values (12345, '{"testkey":"test1234", "testname" ...


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You'll need to make the following changes in your Bio class and related mappings : Use a foreign ID generator. Introduce a hasOne/belongTo bi-directional relationship You also need to make sure that any linked element property is not insertable or updatable. For a concrete example http://blog.swwomm.com/2011/09/grails-foreign-id-generator.html Other ...


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I ran into the same problem when writing a migration that used grailsChange. In my case, it would run hundreds of transactions successfully, and then fail on the outermost transaction that is most likely associated with the grailsChange itself. Switching from withTransaction to withNewSession resolved the issue. You should not need to manually flush the ...


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Controller code : yourAction(int id){ //do some def faqInstance = Faq.get(id) render[view:"form",model:[faqInstance:faqInstance]] } View code : <g:select name="faqCategory" from="${FaqCategory.list()}" value="${faqInstance?.faqCategory?.categoryType}" optionKey="id" /> Hope it helps..


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You haven't provided enough information to show the context in which this select is being used so it is hard to say exactly what you need, but something like this should work: <g:select name="faqCategory" from="${FaqCategory.list()}" value="${you only need this if you want to preselect a value}" optionKey="id" /> See ...


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It's currently not supported, but you can do some hacks to add the missing metamethod (getDEFAULT). You can do a feature request issue on Grails Jira if you think this is an important feature. It might make sense to support static access (CompileStatic) by adding a separate method for looking up the so called GormStaticApi instance for the given datasource. ...


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select pb.id,pr.id from purchase_bill pb left join purchase_bill_return pr on pb.id=pr.purchase_bill_id and pb.customer_supplier_id=pr.customer_supplier_id and pr.company_id = pb.company_id and pr.transaction_no = pb.transaction_no where pb.company_id =3 and pb.transaction_no = 'Y' and pr.costomer_suplier_id=99


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This is because you are applying filters in the where clause to the rows on the outside of the left join. If the row is null because of the left join, then WHERE pr.company_id = 3 will be false (pr.company_id is null, not 3). Move all of the conditions on the pr table up to the LEFT JOIN conditions instead of conditions in the WHERE clause (note I've ...


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This worked: <g:select from="['DESKTOP/LAPTOP','SMARTPHONES','OTHERS','TABLETS']" name="device" id ="device" onchange="${remoteFunction( controller:'Pgtyp', action:'ajaxGetMv', ...


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You can do the following using gorm events: class Author { String name Integer bookCount = 0 static hasMany = [books:Book] Integer getBookCount () { books?.size () ?: 0 } void beforeUpdate () { bookCount = getBookCount () } static constraints = { } } The beforeUpdate method will be called before the ...


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You can achieve this by using hasMany. Furthermore you need to define books as a List since without it you would get a simple Set that does not allow any duplicates. class Catalogue { static hasMany = [books: String] List books }


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Create a domain Book class: class Book { String title String isbn ... String toString(){ return "${title}" } } and modify your Catalogue as class Catalogue{ String name .... static hasMany = [books: Book] //etc etc }


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You can separate multiple parameters using &key=value. Think of URL parameters for a GET request. Please use proper classes (mySelect1, mySelect2) for the select boxes, so you can access them easily using jQuery. params:'\'mv=\' + $(\'.mySelect1\').find(\':selected\').text() + \'&br=\' + $(\'.mySelect2\').find(\':selected\').text()',


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Sorry,noob mistake. The problems might have been because, there was another copy of the same file in a different package. Deleting the duplicate fixed things up.


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I expect that your schema has been created with a constraint which does not allow the column to be null. If Grails is creating the column after you have set nullable: true then you should be ok. If the column already exists then you may need to alter the schema yourself, independent of the Grails app. Also, if the endDate property is a Date object, you ...


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Both ways offer cascading effects in the same way. Their only difference is that in the former case you'll have a reference to author in Book object whereas you don't in the latter. That is: You can say Book b = new Book(); b.author in the second case.


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You should be able to remove all with the following syntax: Resource.collection.remove(new BasicDBObject()); assuming Resource is a collection.


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I've found a way to get rid of the error using this code: @Component class ObjectMapperConfiguration implements InitializingBean { @Autowired ObjectMapper objectMapper @Override void afterPropertiesSet() { def validationErrorsModule = new SimpleModule() validationErrorsModule.addSerializer(ValidationErrors, new ...


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Use a hasOne association to store the foreign key reference in a bidirectional one-to-one. Since you don't want to add the relationship from other side each time so you can make a setter to ease your work, like- setParentOrg(parentInstance){ this.parentOrg = parentInstance parentInstance.childOrg = this } Now when you do ...


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if I'm correct you're missing belongsTo definition, because you need to define that every instance of Organization is owned by its parentOrg instance. try this class declaration: class Organization { String title Organization parentOrg static belongsTo = [parentOrg: Organization] static hasMany = [ childOrg: Organization ] static mappedBy = [ ...


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Do what @saw303 says or do order.discard() to tell Hibernate to not persist that object


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By looking at your code, I can presume that Salary should contain a Person's identifier, instead of Employee. class Salary { Person person double salary Date from_date Date to_date } On the other hand, if you want Employee to be in the relationship with Salary, then the hasMany property should be: class Person { String firstName, lastName ...


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You can also try sqlType, like class Foo { static hasMany = [bar: String] static mapping = { names joinTable: [column: 'bar', sqlType: 'varchar(32)'] } }


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This works (tested with grails 2.4): class Foo { static hasMany = [ bars:String ] static mapping = { bars joinTable: [column: 'BARS_STRING', length: 112] } }


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You can do it by defining your own Hibernate user type class Person { String description static mapping = { description type: StringMediumTextType } } You find everything regarding your question in the Reference Guide. Hope this helps


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Use read instead of get. def order = Order.read(params.id) and mark the controller action as @Transactional(readOnly=true). Another option is to move the calculation into a service class and mark the service method @Transactional(readOnly=true)


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Not if it is a Set, which is the default type for hasMany relationships. By default when mapping an indexed collection such as a Map or List the index is stored in a column called association_name_idx Grails documentation


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I did some digging and found out that starting on grails 2.3 you have the following mapping option: tablePerConcreteClass true It seems the documentation (even for version 2.4) hasn't been updated regarding this yet.


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I have been solving this using left join, after upgrading a 1.3.7 project to 2.2.x. It's very annoying for a large project. I'm still investigating to see if there's an alternative. or { userTerm(CriteriaSpecification.LEFT_JOIN) { and { le('startDate', endDate) ge('endDate', startDate) } } ...


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A few things you could take a look at : a hack for backward compatibility - since grails 2.3.4 I think : in your config.groovy // Null object error fix for backward compatibility grails.databinding.convertEmptyStringsToNull = false This stops converting blanks to nulls - and may cure your issue, there was a reason why this feature was added - for ...


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In regards to the null you could try : class SurveyResponseSet { UserSurvey userSurvey Integer sumWeight = 0 . . . static mapping = { userSurvey ignoreNotFound : true } static constraints = { sumWeight nullable:true, default: 0 } } See if that removes the null elements from the list


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I don't know if there is a standard solution to that. In case there is not, you can build a loop inside the constraint closure: static constraints = { // use MyCustomCOnstraint:true for fields firstname, lastname and address ['firstname', 'lastname', 'address'].each { property -> "$property"(MyCustomCOnstraint:true) } }


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So based on this answer from a previous StackOverflow question, I updated the code as follows: class Record { static hasMany = [numbers: Long] Long id String description void recordNumber(Long number) { //requirements, validations, etc. addToNumbers number } } It would seem that if a collection is meant to be persistent, it has to ...


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You are saving a new record instance each time the action is called. You should load it out of the DB instead: def recordNumber( Long id ){ def record = Record.get id def number = getNumberFromRequest() //request.JSON, request.XML, etc. //.... }


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If you want to see what changed between versions I suggest you look at the change log for the plugin. Typically plugins which have issue trackers (on the plugin portal page for the plugin) have some type of change log within them.


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I have done something below successfully. Are you doing this in the mapping closure? static mapping = { id column:'LICNUM' } See examples in documentation: http://grails.org/doc/latest/ref/Database%20Mapping/id.html


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I'm not sure this answer can fit your problem, but do you think you can use two domains instead of one ? For example: class Node { String text } and (for example): class NodesLst { List nodes static hasMany = [nodes:Nodes] } If you know List in Java / Groovy, all your functions will be easy to write. Hope this helps


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Use: Issue.withTransaction { status -> Issue issueInstance // Get issue instance def receiptItemInstance // get receipt item instance if (!receiptItemInstance.validate()) { status.setRollbackOnly() return // Exit the transaction block } // Conitune with your code }



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