Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

You will need to enhance your domain to use GORM based mapping hints (given to Hibernate) to accomplish this. Your domain could look something like this: class A { static hasOne = [b: B] } class B { // stuff } Using the hasOne will allow Hibernate to manage the association and thus allows you to use the a.bId notation. Hope this helps.


0

I've solved my issue in case anyone else comes across this. It may not be the optimal solution but I haven't found an alternative. I've added a custom validator to the Media class that calls validate() on the embedded Film class and adds any errors that arise to the Media objects errors class Media{ ObjectId id; String name; Film film; static mapWith = ...


0

Burt, thank you for this explanation. It helps. MVC becomes MVCS. But please, one more clarification: I understood once, that a controller will want to save an updated class (after binding new params) _on_his_own_ even without my call to .save(). How would this interfere with the already handled/saved class inside a service called in between? Or the ...


2

withTransaction has nothing to do with the domain class it's called on, but it's a bit of a hack, because it lets you do silly things like transactional persistence in controllers. Controllers should focus on HTTP-related stuff, and delegate real work to services, which are conveniently transactional by default unless you disable it for a particular service. ...


0

I believe you can read the config variables right from your mapping block. So this line in the app consuming your plugin's Config.groovy grails.myplugin.useIndexForFoo = true Should allow you to have a configurable domain class, such as class Foo { String myString static mapping = { if (Holders.config?.grails?.myplugin?.useIndexForFoo) ...


1

We don't really support passing null as an argument to a dynamic finder like that. Dynamic finders have explicit support for querying by null. Instead of DomainClass.findByName(null) you would call DomainClass.findByNameIsNull(). If you have a reference that may or may not be null, instead of passing that as an argument to a dynamic finder, the code can ...


2

Are you looking for something like this?... def results = Scholarship.withCriteria { grades { // myId must be defined somewhere above... idEq myId } } EDIT A comment below adds to the original question and asks what if another relationship was expressed like this... class Scholarship { static hasMany = ...


0

With Where queries and Detached criteria out of the question one option would be using sqlRestriction like so: Batch.withCriteria { sqlRestriction """ exists ( select * from record r join record_details rd on rd.record_id = r.id where r.batch_id = {alias}.id and r.type like ? ...


0

In grails we use belongsTo for cascading purpose,You should use class Nose { belongsTo = [person:Person] } and yes in case of belongsTo a back reference will be stored in Nose having the person_id.


0

You should reference the Person in the Nose, not Nose itself, like this: class Person { Nose nose } class Nose { static belongsTo = [person: Person] } EDIT AFTER COMMENT: ah, I see. Now that I am reading your question again, were you expecting to have both a person_id column in Nose and nose_id column in Person? Because that will never happen in ...


0

The problem is solved. It seems grails have problems with language packages of the Operating System. I was using Turkish language pack of Windows and Centos. Now I've changed it to English and the problem is solved.


0

Yes, you can use EXEC sp_addextendedproperty @name = N'MS_Description', @value = N'Your Comment goes here', @level0type = N'SCHEMA', @level0name = N'Your schema name', @level1type = N'TABLE', @level1name = N'Your table name', @level2type = NULL, @level2name = NULL If you're managing your DB using SSDT you can put this ...


0

Yes you can use Mongo and postgre both using following line of code in dataSource.groovy development { grails { mongo { host = "localhost" username = "" password = "" databaseName = "schema_name" } } dataSource_lookup { dialect = 'org.hibernate.dialect.PostgreSQLDialect' ...


0

You can prevent duplicate row using following implementation: def users = criteria.list(offset:0, max:10) { fetchMode "wishList", FetchMode.JOIN resultTransformer Criteria.DISTINCT_ROOT_ENTITY }


0

I believe the GORM mapping DSL expects just one id definition. Try combining your two id lines into just this one: id generator: 'assigned', composite: ["name", "lastName"] Also, in addition to implementing Serializable, your domain class should override equals and hashCode, as described under "Composite Primary Keys" here: ...


1

It is stated quite clearly in the Grails manual for you case: In this case the key and value of the map MUST be strings. See that section ('Maps of Objects') for an alternate option (using a hasMany on your Map to define the value type).


0

If I am not wrong, you are asking about possibility of saving data in two data stores(Mongodb and Postgredb). In Postgredb, you want to store Spring Security authentication data and other application data in Mongodb.Yes, this is possible. My current project had similar requirements and we are using MySQL and MongoDb.


0

In this environment when a record is deleted in the child table grails tries to delete the entry in the parent table. However this seems to be done in a different transaction so if this second delete fails then grails is unable to recover to a coherent state.


1

At some point, the values in your map need to get mapped to a column in your database. That database column has to have a specific data type. My guess is that since Map<String, Object> is pretty ambiguous as far as what it contains, that GORM just made that column a varchar and so it's expecting everything to be a string. If you need to store ints as ...


1

The addToXXX and removeFromXXX dynamic methods are created from the key in the hasMany map; this is also the name of the Set or List that Grails adds to the class for you to hold the items. Prefix with addTo (or removeFrom) and capitalize the first letter - so for taxonGroups it would be addToTaxonGroups, not addToTaxonGroup. Likewise for behaviors it'd be ...


0

Can you modify the domain class definition in grails for Position as such to let gorm know about the association? Position { static hasMany = [budgets:Budget, employees:Employee] } Then you can do and hql statment like such: from Budget b left join b.position p where p.employees is not empty


0

The question left unanswered. Our solution is to convert from GORM to spring-data/jpa.


0

You probably can, but you'd need to access the underlying real clob and then use the database-specific syntax for working with clobs in queries. For an example of how to do this in Oracle, see this other StackOverflow question. It's going to tend to be very inefficient though, especially of the clobs are large - it's unlikely that there's going to be any ...


0

I had the similar problem but in my case I had another relation between my equivalents to User and the Bank. This made the hasMany statement to use the wrong relation to map the many to many relation. In my case it was solved by adding a mappedBy statement to the relation: class Bank{ ... static mappedBy=[users:'banks'] ... } and class User{ ...


0

I believe can achieve this by declaring a property named fetchMode in your domain class that contains a map of property/fetch types class MyClass { static fetchMode = [clobCol: 'lazy'] ... }


0

I figured out the issue. It's my bad, given the port number as 27107 instead of 27017 and i took a day to figure this out. LOL


0

There is a new version which fixs many bugs such this :It is 0.5.1 insead of 0.5 BuildConfig.groovy runtime ':db-reverse-engineer:0.5.1'


1

Hibernate, and the HQL/GORM layers that sit on top of Hibernate, do not directly support database-specific functions like Oracle's LISTAGG(). There are, however, a few ways to use native SQL within Grails. If you would like to add your concatenated value to one of your domain objects, you can use GORM's derived property feature ...


3

The issue is with this line: CourseOffering newCourse = new CourseOffering(params) Because you created the newCourse by passing in the params, you are binding the param 'term' which has no means to convert convert one from a string. Renaming the term param to termId and this will move you forward. GSP View: Term <select name="termId"> ...


0

I found leftShift operator useful for composing closure from two separate ones. What you can do is: Closure a = { /*...*/ } Closure b = { /*...*/ } Closure c = a << b Take a look at this example: def criteria = { projection Projections.distinct(Projections.property('id')) and { eq 'owner.id', userDetails.id if ...


0

No. Dynamic finders like findAllBy* do not support excluding locked objects.


0

Got the solution. The issue was with the grails-datastore-gorm dependency, which was pulling in an older version of spring-beans. https://jira.grails.org/browse/GRAILS-11813


0

I got the solution. Some how mongodb plugin was trying to pull BUILD-SNAPSHOT version of grails-datastore-gorm-plugin-support which is not available in maven. So I added its RELEASE version in BuildConfig dependency compile 'org.grails:grails-datastore-gorm-plugin-support:3.1.3.RELEASE' And it worked.


0

Check this answer:Default getdate for Insert date You should use GetDate() as DEFAULT VALUE for the field in the table, with this you don't need trigger or something similar.


2

Just try: setResultTransformer(Criteria.DISTINCT_ROOT_ENTITY) in withCriteria For further info see blog


0

Grails does use the spring.hibernate.naming_strategy setting, but not in such a way that it's then used as you'd expect, and it leaves the default naming strategy untouched. I'm not sure what the reasons for that are. You might want to raise an issue to discuss it with the Grails team. In the meantime, it's possible to configure the default naming strategy ...


0

class Page { def beforeInsert() { this.beforeUpdate() } def beforeUpdate() { this.urlCrc = 'calculate something' } }


1

Try grouping by month like GROUP BY MONTH(al.activationDate)


1

If you are using auto binding and after that inserting some data in the instance then you need to validate the instance. Try this machineInstanceInstance.validate() machineInstanceInstance.errors.each{println it} if (machineInstanceInstance.hasErrors()) { more code }


1

I finally managed to solve problem by doing : must { nested { path = "status" query { bool { must { term("status.name": "active") } } } } } Hope it helps others.


0

As fas as no final conclusion made, I'd like to share my expierence in the same situation. Here one can find more discussion. I my case, I have dev environment under the windows on local pc including local MySQL. Production env - Centos 6, MySQL, Tomcat 6 behind Apache. In dev environment - everything was o'k, but on production - no. The only thing that ...


0

As the doc says, it is the same to do belongsTo = [author:Author] than belongsTo = Autor, both will create a property called author referencing the "father" object. Saludos


0

Basing on @Donal Answer , i think on trick to resolve this issue : Instead of : class Project { User addedBy; //.................. } we will have: class Project { Long addedById; //.................. User addedBy(){ User.get(this.addedById) } } this means, we solve this issue in domain layer


1

In general, you can't have primary-foreign key relationships between tables in different databases.


0

It will be usefull this thread Dynamic finders with Grail many-to-many relationship I had the same problem. It's work for me.


0

I finally figured it out. Calling save(flush: true) is not sufficient. The key is to re-query the database, because that is when the where-clause generates the formula. After saving the domain object, one must call refresh() on it. That re-queries the database and populates the formula-based field.


0

book1.save() do not returns true, returns itself (book1) or returns null when errors. There are four ways of to tell if object can be saved validate method before save. It should to return true hasErrors property before save. It should to return false save method returns the instance if all is ok save method with (failOnError: true) argument raise an ...


0

The issue with the second parameter in your query Students is the fact it's an 1:M (one to many) association and querying these associations using dynamic finders is not supported. Take a look at this quick overview of the various types of querying supported by GORM/Grails to get a better understanding of what kind of options are available to you and when ...


2

If you're using Hibernate 4, your DataSource.groovy is probably misconfigured. In a new 2.4.x app you'll see this in the hibernate section: // cache.region.factory_class = 'net.sf.ehcache.hibernate.EhCacheRegionFactory' // Hibernate 3 cache.region.factory_class = 'org.hibernate.cache.ehcache.EhCacheRegionFactory' // Hibernate 4 and you pick the one you ...


0

For future reference for those who find this answer, here's another possible cause: I encountered this problem, and it was due to something as simple as a typo in the setters (mostly likely due to a cut and paste operation) : @OneToMany(fetch = FetchType.EAGER, mappedBy = "chgByUser") public Set<ScheduledEvent> getChangedEvents() { return ...



Top 50 recent answers are included