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21

Yes, you're jumping over both m = 0 and m < 5, and this is as it should be. for (A; B; C) D; is equivalent to { A; loop: if (B) { D; C; goto loop; } } There is no way to transfer control to a point between A and B. The semantics of your loop are exactly like this "pure goto" version: int m = 5; goto ...


6

Does goto is always supposed to omit conditional expression of the for loop? Yes. A goto jump is always an unconditional jump and the execution will carry from the label from there. From C11 draft, § 6.8.6.1 The goto statement: A goto statement causes an unconditional jump to the statement prefixed by the named label in the enclosing function. ...


4

Regardless if the 'if' statement is entered or not, the next statement will be the printf statement. If it skips the 'if statement', printf comes up next, if the 'if statement' is entered, then it goto's the printf. Either way the statement will display. The 'out' is kind of like an index that the assembly keeps track of. If the goto 'out' weren't there, ...


4

Assume that the value of a is 1, in which case, a<0 is false, so the if-statement goto out; is skipped and the program resumes sequential execution. The next statement is obviously: out: printf("out"); Note that out: is just a label, so the printf() statement is executed. Thus, out is printed, just because it is the next sequential step in the ...


4

The goto statement in your code is causing an unconditional jump to a statement inside a for loop.When that statement is executed,the flow of the program is supposed to be dependent on the conditional expression in the loop.So,yes initialization inside the loop is skipped.


3

The question is void, because it simply cannot be done like this: you only can goto within a function, not between functions. For jumping between functions, you can use setjmp/longjmp.


3

This will result in undefined behavior in standard C. From 6.8.6.1/1 of the C Language Standard: The identifier in a goto statement shall name a label located somewhere in the enclosing function. A goto statement shall not jump from outside the scope of an identifier having a variably modified type to inside the scope of that identifier.


3

If a < 0. you hit the goto, which takes you to the labeled code. If a >= 0, you skip the goto... but the next line is the labeled code, anyway. Labeled code doesn't -only- get executed when a goto brings the execution path there.


2

Firstly, you should avoid using goto when you can. You probably want an if else or at least a bracketed if int main(){ int a = 1; if (a<0){ printf("out"); } } OR int main(){ int a = 1; if (a<0){ printf("out"); } else { print("in"); } return 1; }


2

A goto statement in C programming provides an unconditional jump from the 'goto' to a labeled statement in the same function. Note the unconditional term here. so yes it is supposed to omit conditional expression of for loop.


2

You should use a do/while loop, for example if you have the following for loop: for(A ; B ; C) { D; } You should use the following do/while loop: A; do { D; C; }while(B); which will force a first iteration. EDIT See the comment by chux: If D; contains continue, this way will not work, you will need another way EDIT II As the question ...


2

This is perfectly legal in c. There's nothing wrong in jumping into a for loop so long as you don't skip over any declarations or initialisations of automatic variables. In you case, m is incremented once and the loop terminates due to the stopping condition being met.


2

There are two types of jumps that goto can perform. 1 --> Forward jump 2 --> Backward jump You could try the following program: #include<conio.h> #include<stdio.h> #include<stdio.h> main() { int i=1; goto x; y: printf("This is the 1st goto statement\n"); goto z; x: if(i==1) { ...


1

A goto statement in C programming provides an unconditional jump from the 'goto' to a labeled statement in the same function. Labels are local to a single function, you cannot jump between different functions. NOTE − In my opinion the use of goto statement is highly discouraged. ref: http://www.tutorialspoint.com/cprogramming/c_goto_statement.htm


1

You are comparing with errormsg == checkpass(password); when you should assign with one = symbol.



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