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30

If you use OpenCL, you can easily use it both on Windows and Linux because having display drivers is enough to run OpenCL programs and for programming you would simply need to install the SDK. CUDA has more requirements on specific GCC versions etc. But it is not much more difficult to install on Linux also. In Linux CUDA has strange requirements such as ...


15

You just have to add the __host__ keyword to be able to call call a function from host or device. __host__ __device__ int sum(int a, int b){ return a+b; }


7

cudaMallocManaged() is not about speeding up your application (with a few exceptions or corner cases, some are suggested below). Today's implementation of Unified Memory and cudaMallocManaged will not be faster than intelligently written code written by a proficient CUDA programmer, to do the same thing. The machine (cuda runtime) is not smarter than you ...


7

Note that a bank is not the same thing as a word or location in shared memory. A bank refers collectively to all words in shared memory that satisfy a certain address pattern condition. In general, shared memory bank conflicts can be avoided if all accesses from a warp (or half-warp in cc 1.x) go to separate banks. These accesses need not be in warp ...


6

The IOMMU is very useful in that it provides a set of mapping registers. It can arrange for any physical memory to appear within the address range accessible by a device, and it can cause physically scattered buffers to look contiguous to devices, too. This is not good for 3rd party PCI/PCI-Express cards or remote machines attempting to access the raw ...


6

I am the developer of VexCL library. I have to admit dense linear algebra operations are not on my priority list. I believe it is very hard to implement those in a way that would be performance-portable across various devices supported by VexCL (that is, by OpenCL/CUDA). This task is probably best left to the vendor BLAS implementations (but patches are ...


6

Because dot product is a function that uses each vector element only once. That means that the time to send it to the video card is much greater than to calculate everything on cpu, because PCIExpress is much slower than RAM.


6

This looks like a cumulative sum operation, in which the final value of x[i] is the sum of all values x[0]...x[i] in the original array. In CUDA, this is called a scan or prefix-sum operation, and it can be efficiently parallelized. See e.g. this lecture for examples.


5

From the programming guide: The maximum number of kernel launches that a device can execute concurrently is 32 on devices of compute capability 3.5 and 16 on devices of lower compute capability.


5

To sum only positive values, you do not need to sort your initial values, use thrust::transform_reduce: template<typename T> struct positive_value : public thrust::unary_function<T,T> { __host__ __device__ T operator()(const T &x) const { return x < T(0) ? 0 : x; } }; float result = thrust::transform_reduce(data.begin(), ...


5

Yes, the new unified memory feature in CUDA 6 will make it possible, on Kepler devices and beyond (so not on your Fermi GPU) to share pointers between host and device code. In order to accomplish this, you will need to use a Kepler device (so cc 3.0 or 3.5) and the new cudaMallocManaged API. This will be further documented when CUDA 6.0 is officially ...


5

There are really two answers to this question. 1: Don't believe the hype regarding GPUs. For some workloads they are faster. However, for many workloads, the difference is small or negative. You have at least 2 different processor types, don't worry about which one get used, only worry if the performance is what you want. 2: For performance tuning I ...


5

Starting with your stated goal: "I would like to be able to run my programs on any GPU." Then yes, you should learn OpenCL. In answer to your overall question, other GPU vendors do use different architectures than Nvidia GPUs. In fact, GPU designs from a single vendor can vary by quite a bit, depending on the model. This is one reason that a given ...


5

Are you using OpenCL 1.0? That doesn't allow writes to char* by default. 1.0 only supports writes into ints. You need 1.1 or the extension http://www.khronos.org/registry/cl/sdk/1.0/docs/man/xhtml/cl_khr_byte_addressable_store.html You can try adding #pragma OPENCL EXTENSION cl_khr_byte_addressable_store : enable At the start of your kernel.


5

In general, my experience with libraries like LAPACK, fftw, cuFFT, etc. is that when you want to do many really small problems like this, you are better off writing your own for performance. Those libraries are usually written for generality, so you can often beat their performance for specific small problems, especially if you can use unique properties of ...


5

It would be nice if you included a link to where, in the "Nvidia notes", this appeared. both threads will be in the same warp No, they won't, at least not in all cases. What happens when tx = 32? Then the thread corresponding to tx belongs to warp 1 in the block, and the thread corresponding to tx-1 belongs to warp 0 in the block. There's no ...


5

In GLSL the uniforms are accessible from every shader stage and instance in a read only manner. So it shows the behavior of the corresponding OpenCl global memory. Considering the constness of these values (that you can't modify them inside the shaders) it equals especially the __constant memory of OpenCL. More information can be found here: ...


5

The short answer is, no you can't do this. There is no way to call any code which relies on glibc from kernel space. That implies that there is no way of making CUDA or OpenCL API calls from kernel space, because those libraries rely on glibc and a host of other user space helper libraries and user space system APIs which are unavailable in kernel space. ...


5

Unfortunately, there is no method in the OpenCL specification which allows you to directly create an image from a buffer when the buffer data has a stride not equal to the image width. The most efficient solution would probably be to write your own kernel to do this. The simplest solution that doesn't involve writing your own kernel would be to copy one ...


4

The volatile qualifier specifies to the compiler that all references to a variable (read or write) should result in a memory reference and those references must be in the order specified in the program. The use of the volatile qualifier is illustrated in Chapter 12 of the Shane Cook book, "CUDA Programming". The use of volatile will avoid some ...


4

Reading Vertex output: Look for Transform Feedback - But you will have to have OpenGL ES 3.0 to use this. For ES2.0 I suggest using fragment shader and Render To Texture techniques. Here is some link with tutorial After rendering to texture you basically have to read pixels of the texture. Nice tutorial on reading the data here tutorial about feedback: ...


4

The shared memory hardware includes 1024 locks. If you call an atomic intrinsic that operates on shared memory, the compiler emits a short loop that acquires and conditionally releases the lock, or loops if the lock was not acquired. As a result, performance can be extremely data-dependent: if all 32 threads in a warp try to acquire different locks, they ...


4

Nexus 4, 5, 7 (2013 model only, not the original one), and 10 all support GPU compute for RenderScript. At the current point in time, every Nexus device sold in the Play Store has GPU-accelerated RenderScript. Nexus is the fastest and easiest way to get the latest features of Android, but other Qualcomm Adreno devices and Samsung Exynos5-based devices will ...


4

Normally the nvcc device code compiler will make it's own decisions about when to inline a particular __device__ function and generally speaking, you probably don't need to worry about overriding that with the __forceinline__ decorator/directive. cc 1.x devices don't have all the same hardware capabilities as newer devices, so very often the compiler will ...


4

The Trove library is a CUDA/C++ library with support for AoS support, and likely gives close to optimal performance for random AoS access. From the GitHub page it looks like trove will get about 2x over the naive approach for 16-byte structures. https://github.com/BryanCatanzaro/trove


4

This assumes you have proprietary drivers installed, but issue the following command... nvidia-smi The output should look similar to this: Mon Dec 23 10:50:28 2013 +------------------------------------------------------+ | NVIDIA-SMI 331.20 Driver Version: 331.20 | ...


4

My Cuckoo Cycle proof-of-work scheme seems to fit the bill, as it is 5% computation and 95% random access to global shared memory, incurring long latencies. GPU memory is limited and has much worse latencies, and there's not enough computation to keep more than a few dozen gpu-cores busy. Other features: it can require any desired amount of RAM, and is ...


4

I think your conjecture of shared memory initialized to 0 is questionable. Try the following code, which is a slight modification of yours. Here, I'm calling the kernel twice and altering the values of the data array. The first time the kernel is launched, the "uninitialized" values of data will be all 0's. The second time the kernel is launched, the ...


4

Your main problem is a wrong memory usage and storage. With your code you also corrupted the heap! I rechanged your code by using row-major ordering, as it's usually used in c/c++. Your first error occurs when you write the inputs into host memory matrix_a[r*M+c]. Because r range is from 0..M(3) and c range is from 0..N(2) the maximum index is 2*3+1=7. But ...


4

Using multiple render passes is usually slower than using one pass with MRT output, but this will also depend on your situation. As I understand it, both f(I) and g(I) sample the input image I, and if each samples the same (or closely neighboring) loactions, you can greatly profit from the texture cache between the different operations - you have to sample ...



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