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91

You can use the entity's key to retrieve it: SELECT * FROM Programme where __key__ = KEY('agtzcG9...................') And, you should be able to query using the name similarly: SELECT * FROM Programme where __key__ = KEY('Programme', '_1') Note that this is not something that you would want to do in your AppEngine application; as Nick notes in his ...


60

BigTable, which is the database back end for App Engine, will scale to millions of records. Due to this, App Engine will not allow you to do any query that will result in a table scan, as performance would be dreadful for a well populated table. In other words, every query must use an index. This is why you can only do =, > and < queries. (In fact you ...


59

Try this: SELECT * FROM Model where __key__ = KEY('Model', <numeric_id>)


19

I know you say GQL, but here's a python helper function I use: import datetime def seconds_ago(time_s): return datetime.datetime.now() - datetime.timedelta(seconds=time_s) There may well be a more concise way to write it: I'm not a python expert and went with the first thing that worked. Take a look at the datetime docs if you care. It's used like ...


18

You have to flip your thinking when working with a scalable datastore like GAE to do your calculations up front. In this case that means you need to keep counters for each baz and increment them whenever you add a new bar, instead of counting at the time of display. class CategoryCounter(db.Model): category = db.StringProperty() count = ...


18

For numeric IDs, a form similar to the query-by-name works: SELECT * from Programme where __key__ = KEY('Programme', 1234567) I found this form especially useful in the Admin Console.


16

You don't need to query to get an entity by key at all - you can simply fetch the entity by its key. In Python, you can do this with MyModel.get_by_key_name('_1'). This is 3 to 5 times faster than Adam's suggestion of using a query.


16

NoSQL is an umbrella term for all the databases that are different from 'the standard' SQL databases, such as MySQL, Microsoft SQL Server and PostgreSQL. These 'standard' SQL databases are all relational databases, feature the SQL query language and adhere to the ACID properties. These properties basically boil down to consistency. A NoSQL database is ...


14

+1 to Jehiah's response. Official and blessed method on getting object counters on GAE is to build sharded counter. Despite heavily sounding name, this is pretty straightforward.


13

SELECT * FROM simpletable WHERE datefield < DATETIME(year, month, day, hour, minute, second) computing those year, month, &c, in your application code.


13

Here is a good link: One to Many Join using Google App Engine. http://blog.arbingersys.com/2008/04/google-app-engine-one-to-many-join.html Here is another good link: Many to Many Join using Google App Engine: http://blog.arbingersys.com/2008/04/google-app-engine-many-to-many-join.html Here is a good discussion regarding the above two links: ...


13

I don't think there is an operator like that in the datastore. Do you control the input of the category data? If so, you should choose a canonical form to store it in (all lowercase or all uppercase). If you need to store the original case for some reason, then you could just store two columns - one with the original, one with the standardized one. That ...


12

Yep, that's pretty much it. Retrieve all the entities you want to sum, and sum them in your app. There is no SUM in GQL. If what you're trying to accomplish is to find the average rating for an entity, there's a better way. class RateableThing(db.Model): num_ratings = db.IntegerProperty() avg_rating = db.FloatProperty() Finding the thing's ...


12

When using filter(), you are required to have a space between the field name and the operator. To get your filter() call to work as intended, you just need to insert a space before the equal sign: randy_res = Vote.all().filter('created_by =', randy).fetch(limit=10)


10

You shouldn't be inserting user data into a GQL string using string substitution. GQL supports parameter substitution, so you can do this: db.GqlQuery("SELECT * FROM Schedule WHERE station = $1", foo.key()) or, using the Query interface: Schedule.all().filter("station =", foo.key())


10

The DataStore in Google App Engine is really quite different from a relational database. There are some similarities, but it's important to understand the differences when you design you data model. The way you would normally define this kind of relationship is by using reference properties: class Customer(db.Model): name = db.StringProperty() class ...


9

Since you have a list of keys, you don't need to do a second query - you can do a batch fetch, instead. Try this: #and this should get me the items that a user saved useritems = db.get(saveditemkeys) (Note you don't even need the guard clause - a db.get on 0 entities is short-circuited appropritely.) What's the difference, you may ask? Well, a db.get ...


9

It's very functionally limited compared to a relational DB: no joins, no real data-integrity checks (such as uniqueness &c), no GROUP BY and aggregation functions such as SUM etc etc, transactions only within one entity-group, etc, etc -- MANY differences. Not only must you do a lot more at application level (instead of doing it in the database), but ...


9

Altough App Engine does not support LIKE queries, have a look at the properties ListProperty and StringListProperty. When an equality test is done on these properties, the test will actually be applied on all list members, e.g., list_property = value tests if the value appears anywhere in the list. Sometimes this feature might be used as a workaround to the ...


9

To get the max you using GQL, you could do this: max_x = db.GqlQuery("SELECT * FROM MyModel ORDER BY x DESC").get().x You could use this syntactically shorter but equivalent approach: max_x = MyModel.all().order('-x').get().x


8

App Engine doesn't treat GeoPt properties specially - it has no built in spatial indexing. There are a number of third-party libraries that add support for spatial indexing, however. The best one (in my opinion) being geomodel.


8

The SQL aggregate functions are not available. What you want to do is follow patterns like the sharded counters example: http://code.google.com/appengine/articles/sharding_counters.html which explain that instead of aggregating the values on queries, you want to keep the counters up to date when the values are inserted, updated, or deleted. The example ...


8

Quoting from the documentation: Tip: Query filters do not have an explicit way to match just part of a string value, but you can fake a prefix match using inequality filters: db.GqlQuery("SELECT * FROM MyModel WHERE prop >= :1 AND prop < :2", "abc", u"abc" + u"\ufffd") This matches every MyModel entity with a string property prop that begins with ...


8

Although ancestor is described as a "filter", it actually just updates the query to add the ancestor condition. You don't send a request to the datastore until you iterate over the query, so what you have will work fine. One minor point though: 500 entities with the same parent can hurt scalability, since writes are serialized to members of an entity group. ...


8

The GQL language can only be used to retrieve entities or key (cf. http://code.google.com/appengine/docs/python/datastore/gqlreference.html) You'll have to do this: persons = Person.all() for p in persons: p.delete() Regarding the error BadValueError: Property y must be a str or unicode instance, not a long, you'll have to modify all the data (from ...


7

This depends on lots of things like the size of the entities and the number of values that need to look up in the index, so it's best to benchmark it for your specific application. Also beware that if you find that on a sunny day it takes e.g. 10 seconds to load all your items, that probably means that some small fraction of your queries will run into a ...


7

I've had success using the geomodel open-source project for storing and querying lat/lon data in the App Engine datastore. It uses a geohash to enable querying on a single property, it's available for both Python and Java and since it's open source you can modify the code to fit your particular case if need be. It's also worth noting that it was announced ...


6

My experience with google app engine has been great, and the 1000 result limit has been removed, here is a link to the release notes: app-engine release notes No more 1000 result limit - That's right: with addition of Cursors and the culmination of many smaller Datastore stability and performance improvements over the last few months, we're ...


6

There's no equivalent for that query in datastore. Some points: You can't select a single property. SELECT is always SELECT * (you select a whole entity). You can't do joins. You need to denormalize your models to fit the queries you will perform, or perform multiple queries. So to achieve your goal, you need to have last_login stored in Relationship, or ...



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