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17

You have to flip your thinking when working with a scalable datastore like GAE to do your calculations up front. In this case that means you need to keep counters for each baz and increment them whenever you add a new bar, instead of counting at the time of display. class CategoryCounter(db.Model): category = db.StringProperty() count = ...


16

I know you say GQL, but here's a python helper function I use: import datetime def seconds_ago(time_s): return datetime.datetime.now() - datetime.timedelta(seconds=time_s) There may well be a more concise way to write it: I'm not a python expert and went with the first thing that worked. Take a look at the datetime docs if you care. It's used like ...


13

+1 to Jehiah's response. Official and blessed method on getting object counters on GAE is to build sharded counter. Despite heavily sounding name, this is pretty straightforward.


13

I don't think there is an operator like that in the datastore. Do you control the input of the category data? If so, you should choose a canonical form to store it in (all lowercase or all uppercase). If you need to store the original case for some reason, then you could just store two columns - one with the original, one with the standardized one. That ...


11

When using filter(), you are required to have a space between the field name and the operator. To get your filter() call to work as intended, you just need to insert a space before the equal sign: randy_res = Vote.all().filter('created_by =', randy).fetch(limit=10)


11

SELECT * FROM simpletable WHERE datefield < DATETIME(year, month, day, hour, minute, second) computing those year, month, &c, in your application code.


8

Although ancestor is described as a "filter", it actually just updates the query to add the ancestor condition. You don't send a request to the datastore until you iterate over the query, so what you have will work fine. One minor point though: 500 entities with the same parent can hurt scalability, since writes are serialized to members of an entity group. ...


8

The SQL aggregate functions are not available. What you want to do is follow patterns like the sharded counters example: http://code.google.com/appengine/articles/sharding_counters.html which explain that instead of aggregating the values on queries, you want to keep the counters up to date when the values are inserted, updated, or deleted. The example ...


5

The datastore doesn't support case insensitive comparisons, because you can't index queries that use them (barring an index that transforms values). The solution is to store a normalized version of your string in addition to the standard one, as Peter suggests. The property classes in the AETycoon library may prove helpful, in particular, DerivedProperty.


5

I've implemented Ranker in several GAE apps. They're Facebook Applications that have thousands up to hundreds of thousands of people playing. It works well, but for my purposes it has one big drawback: you need to declare in advance the final range over which the participant's scores will fall in. So this is bad for two reasons: if you have a contest ...


5

when doing a get() if there are no results you will have an object containing None I normally do result = query.get() if result is None: #do the following or if you want to check that its not none then if result is not None: #do the following


5

No Though app engine supports an "IN" query, it does not support a "NOT IN" query. However, if your list of entities you don't want is small, then you might as well just retrieve every entity and filter out the ones you don't need yourself. Alternatively, if the list of entities you want to exclude is a large fraction of all entities, then the above ...


4

This thread on the google-appengine group will probably be of interest. It also looks like there's a library, ranklist, specifically for this. Basically, it sounds like they did something similar to sharded counters.


4

Count functions in all databases are slow (eg, O(n)) - the GAE datastore just makes that more obvious. As Jehiah suggests, you need to store the computed count in an entity and refer to that if you want scalability. This isn't unique to App Engine - other databases just hide it better, up until the point where you're trying to count tens of thousands of ...


4

Edit2: Ah, the raw-GQL for use in the data-viewer... Here's one way: 1) Run this and get the ID number: SELECT * FROM Author where name = 'shakespeare' 2) Using ID number from previous query, run this: SELECT * FROM Story where author = key('Author', 12345) Edit: at long last, the raw GQL: (Easiest way: Use the implicit backreference property ...


4

There's no way to retrieve from Datastore different Kinds using the same GQL Select statement. Another option would be using the ReferenceProperty to create a many-to-one relationship between UsersRSS and Files, refactoring your code in this way: class UsersRSS(db.Model): userId = db.IntegerProperty() file = db.ReferenceProperty(Files) added ...


4

There is a useful presentation at Google I/O a while back by Brett Slatkin which describes building a scalable twitter-like microblog app, and deals with this very question at length: http://www.google.com/events/io/2009/sessions/BuildingScalableComplexApps.html


4

The query does not work because you are passing a "CatName" string instead of a ProjectCategory instance's key. Retrieve your desired ProjectCategory entity from Datastore first with: pjc = GqlQuery("SELECT * FROM ProjectCategory WHERE name = :1", "CatName").get() then use it as parameter in the query like this: db.GqlQuery("SELECT * FROM Project WHERE ...


4

According to The Google Appengine Documentation, your code might look like this: myNumber = 4 myResult = db.GqlQuery("SELECT * FROM myData WHERE filter = :num", num=myNumber) or myNumber = 4 myResult = db.GqlQuery("SELECT * FROM myData WHERE filter = :1", myNumber) depending on whether you want to use a named or positional variable.


4

GQL doesn't have a NOT IN statement, so unfortunately, it's not possible to do exactly what you want. If the total set of userIds is small, you can reverse your query to use the IN statement. For instance: SELECT * FROM Answer WHERE userId IN ('2', '3') Note that this is executing a subquery for each value in the IN statement and you are allowed a ...


4

It's basically just a String property. No validation is performed or any kind of structure is assumed. They probably used it in order to support the gd:postalAddress element. https://developers.google.com/gdata/docs/1.0/elements?hl=el#gdPostalAddress


3

You do not have to create strings when querying DateTimeProperty types. Try this: import datetime q = db.GqlQuery("SELECT * FROM LiveData WHERE timestamp > :1", datetime.datetime.now())


3

No. You need to run two queries, one for each kind. Check out the GQL and GqlQuery class references. You can actually do a kindless query using db.GqlQuery('SELECT') to fetch everything. However, you can not filter or order it (other than by key). edit: You may want to check out PolyModel.


3

Whilst it's possible to filter on key - see @dplouffe's answer - it's not a good idea. 'IN' clauses execute one query for each item in the clause, so you end up doing as many queries as there are keys, which is a particularly inefficient way to achieve your goal. Instead, use a batch fetch operation, as @Luke documents, then filter any elements you don't ...


3

The ReferenceProperty creates an automatic query in the referenced entity (using the collection_name if you provided one, which you did): sams_bills = Student.all().filter("name =", "Samuel").get().bills sams_bills is now a db.Query for the bills, which you can call .fetch() on to retrieve one or more bills.


3

GQL doesn't have an OR. See http://code.google.com/appengine/docs/python/datastore/gqlreference.html You'll need to do this as multiple queries.


3

GQL does not have an OR operator. However, it does have an IN operator, which provides a limited form of OR. Docs clearly says that GQL doesn't have an OR operator.. You could do something like this ..Make two queries and combine the results... vendors=vendor.all() pub_vendors = vendors.filter("access = ","public") vendors=vendor.all() ...


3

If an entity in the datastore does not have the new attribute set, then it is impossible to query on it. The entities will not have a null value for the property, the property simply will not exist, therfore will not be included in any indexes that you would use to query your entities. The only way to find your entities that need updating is to map over ALL ...


3

You can't. GQL is not SQL, and the datastore is not a relational database. An entity is stored as a single serialized protocol buffer, and it's impossible to fetch part of an entity; the whole thing needs to be deserialized.


3

Construct a list (value) to be inserted and just update the value of a key: items["BE1234"] = ["2", "100"] detailed (Shiva's comment has a "cleaner" way of doing the same thing): current_val = items["BE1234"] new_val = "100"; new_array = [current_val, new_val] items["BE1234"] = new_array



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