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I have a worked example using AngularJS and Grail here: http://wordpress.transentia.com.au/wordpress/2013/12/24/keeping-up-with-the-joneses/ (apologies if this is not appropriate SO 'style', but I dont' think that posting 100s of lines of code and verbiage is appropriate, either).


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Pass event parameter from sendErrorEmail method above && use the following code in void sendErrorEmail(LoggingEvent event) { StringBuffer buffer = new StringBuffer() String header = layout.getHeader() if(header != null){ buffer.append(header) } buffer.append(layout.format(event)) if(layout.ignoresThrowable()) { ...


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I would say if the message is for request only, use request.message. If a redirect could be involved, use flash and then clear the flash message after displaying it in the gsp: <div class="message"> ${flash?.message} </div> <% // Prevent flash messages displaying twice if there is no redirect flash.message = null %> I would have all ...


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don't expect 100% match between your domain model and the DB schema it's related to. In your case the polymorphism would work only with tablePerHierarchy true for AbstractChildClass. If you do want to stick with tablePerHierarchy false, you can define your class like: class A { static hasMany = [ childrenOne:ExtendingClassOne, ...


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I try to reproduce your bug. http://jsfiddle.net/niscio/63fyrzL8/1/ If you read the documentation the real problem for editing is that you have to use edatagrid declaration $('#ID').edatagrid({... options ...});


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You can use the dynamicUpdate mapping attribute in your Item class: http://grails.org/doc/latest/ref/Database%20Mapping/dynamicUpdate.html With this option enabled, your second way to update a single field using Gorm will be as efficient as the first one.


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In debug, add 'org.optaplanner'. If that doesn't just do it, also make sure that slf4j-log4j.jar is on your classpath. See OptaPlanner docs chapter about logging and Slf4J docs.


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Doing a partial page updates using AJAX is very common with many modern web based UIs or websites. This has little to do with Grails and it's easier to think about what's going on if you think of what is being sent back to the browser as just HTML and ignore the fact it's coming from a Grails template. That said, your question of "... does the old ...


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In order to change the root name you will need to use the NameAwareMarshaller which is slightly more complicated than the implementation you are currently using. While slightly dated, this blog entry explains all the steps in detail. In particular you want to pay attention to the startNode property of the converter. public void marshalObject(Object object, ...


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I figured it out. I took a different route (after more googling). I added dateCreated to my model which is managed by Grails so its updated automatically. So all I needed to do is get the record with the latest date (every year we will add a new record for the coming fiscal year). Take note of the [0] at the end of the call, that flattens the array of ...


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Based on the pointer from Joshua , I found an awesome blog entry by Burt on the same problem. http://burtbeckwith.com/blog/?p=521 It is the exact answer for the problem , I was looking for.


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When you delete an instance that is linked to a hasMany relationship, you also have to remove the object from the 'many' side. For example: employee.removeFromTeam(team) employee.delete(flush: true) It looks like in your example, you likely have a Membership class which holds a Team and an Employee relationship. In this case, you'll need to do the ...


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Seeing as all of the Grails AJAX related tags have been deprecated, I would recommend trying it this way: Markup: <form id="editIndivRecForm" onsubmit="return false;"> <!-- add fields here --> <input type="text" id="uniqueId" value="${something}"> <input type="text" id="secondaryId" value="${something}"> <button id="save" ...


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Without setting the JVM startup parameter: -Dgrails.env=whatever Your grails app will use the value set in <yourapp>/WEB-INF/classes/application.properties There will be a value set like this: grails.env=development This default environment value is determined by what options are used when building the war. You can build the war with ...


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The way you have it set up now, your Components class only allows one product. So you have a one-to-many relationship from Product to Components, this is the reason the join table product_components is not being created. You are also trying to assign a Components instance to multiple products: // To the 'pro' Product new Components(product: pro) // To the ...


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The following findAllBy query should work: Product.findAllBySubIsNotNull() You could also use a where query: Product.where { sub.isEmpty() == false }


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If you have a System property available that tells you what environment you're in you can simply add if statements or a switch statement in your Config.groovy file, like this: if (System.getProperty("foo") == "myTestEnvironment") { myConfigSetting = "test" } else if (System.getProperty("foo") == "myProductionEnvironment") { myConfigSetting = ...


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Set the variable grailsEnv as a environment Java variable for Tomcat below is an example: set CATALINA_OPTS=%CATALINA_OPTS% -Xms256m -Xmx1024m -Dgrails.env=development On a grails command line you add the environment variable: grails run-app -Dgrails.env=stage You can use check the environment variable like this: if ...


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There is no dedicated resource directory for classpath resources, but resources are included from the source directories. You can for instance place your resources in (preferably a sub-directory of) grails-app/conf or src/java. You might run into problems loading them with the system class-loader (who knows what class loader magic is happening in the web ...


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It seems that you can't query for objects which has not-empty collection with dynamic finders (findAllBy*). You can do it using withCriteria instead: Product.withCriteria { isNotEmpty("sub") } It uses Hibernate's Criteria API, which is a bit more powerful than dynamic finders. Grails documentation is quite comprehensive about it.


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The problem is that you're trying to nest a form inside the html table structure. As you figured out, you can have a form inside a single table cell but trying to put a table row inside a form won't work. See this question for some more info: Form inside a table


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maybe your problem may stem from other reasons, I had the same error and after consultation everywhere I suggested making a Grails-CLEAN and everything was solved.


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Rewriting to : onComplete: dataUpdatedOnSuccess() did the trick.


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Have a look at GrailsPluginManager which eventually does that for you. Something like below in BootStrap will be feasible: grailsApplication.mainContext.getBean('pluginManager').allPlugins.each{ plugin-> println "Plugin Info ${plugin.name} - ${plugin.version}" } or just pluginManager.getGrailsPluginForClassName("FooPlugin") if you already have ...


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I believe it should be success: instead of onSuccess:, according to JQuery ajax docs. To demonstrate: http://jsfiddle.net/bL60Lta9/2/


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I found the answer to #2. As per the markdown syntax here: daringfireball.net/projects/markdown/syntax#links , my code should say: def infotext = ""[For further details] (http:\www.myurl.com) "" And it worked!


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grailsApplication is available to Unit tests by default. Just use it directly (even without declaring it as def grailsApplication in tests). Below test should pass. If there is still an element of doubt, print grailsApplication.config in expect:. @TestMixin(GrailsUnitTestMixin) class SampleUnitSpec extends Specification { void "test something"() { ...


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Instead of this static mapping = { week formula('WEEK(DATE_OF_EXPENSE)') //provide the exact column name of the date field month formula('MONTH(DATE_OF_EXPENSE)') year formula ('YEAR(DATE_OF_EXPENSE)') } try this static mapping = { week formula: 'WEEK(DATE)' month formula: 'MONTH(DATE)' year formula: 'YEAR(DATE)' }


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Replace the dash before the version number with a colon, i.e. dependencies { // specify dependencies here under either 'build', 'compile', 'runtime', 'test' or 'provided' scopes e.g. runtime 'mysql:mysql-connector-java:5.0.8' } BTW, 5.0.8 is pretty old. Unless you have a specific reason to use this version, you should use a more recent version ...


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the pattern in your g:field tag will be pass into date template (for example: /_fields/date/_field.gsp) like you pass parameters into other templates. You can access it by ${pattern}. You can use any validator such as bootstrap_validator or jquery_inputmask to do the task


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this config is in my project, using grails 2.3.7 dependencies { // specify dependencies here under either 'build', 'compile', // 'runtime', 'test' or 'provided' scopes eg. compile('org.codehaus.groovy.modules.http-builder:http-builder:0.5.2') { // excludes "xml-apis", "groovy" } }


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This is what you could do In your BuildConfig.groovy add below lines under dependencies. runtime 'org.codehaus.groovy.modules.http-builder:http-builder:0.5.0-RC2' Do a clean and compile after that and then it should pick up your classes.


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First off, using command objects to gather this information is the correct choice. However, implementing complex validation logic within the constraints as custom validators can be a bit overwhelming. You may want to consider injecting a service into your command object then delegating the validation to the service from within the custom validator. For ...


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it may well be happening, because the login action invalidates and re-creates your session during login. For example, Spring-security can do it if configured to. UPDATE: ok, I got it. the key phrase was this one: But when it returns to callback (from twitter oAuth page) action in the same controller: if it does so, a new session is created ...


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save your committee object with flushing: committee.save flush:true then don't load it from the db and save the members so: memberNames.each { CommitteeMembers committeeMembers = new CommitteeMembers( name:it, committee:committee ) if( !committeeMembers.save() ) log.warn "save failed: $committeeMembers.errors" } PS. is the class called ...


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The key here is going to be using log4j Nested Diagnostic Contexts. The documentation for log4j outlines your use case. To illustrate this point, let us take the example of a servlet delivering content to numerous clients. The servlet can build the NDC at the very beginning of the request before executing other code. The contextual information can ...


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This one should work fine: class Person { String name } class SuperHero extends Person { @Override void setName(String name) { super.setName(deriveSuperHeroName(name)) } def deriveSuperHeroName(name) { name } } Or also without @Override annotation: class SuperHero extends Person { void ...


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Looks like the if branch gets executed in edit() instead of the else branch because FilterCategory does not get saved and therfore does not get a proper id.


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What you are trying to do here, is to mock a dependency (DataSource) of a dependency (Sql). This normally leads to a situation, where you a not 100% aware of how the Sql interacts with the DataSource Object. If Sql changes private interaction with the Datasource in a Version Update, you have to deal with the situation. Instead of mocking a dependency of a ...


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You can see the code here: https://github.com/pledbrook/grails-shiro/blob/master/grails-app/taglib/org/apache/shiro/grails/ShiroTagLib.groovy#L119 It looks to me that you might have to include type="ShiroUser" so that it gets a principal with the correct class. So your GSP tag would be <shiro:principal type="ShiroUser" property="firstName" /> ...


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If you assign a value to request.json that will set the content type. You can also set the content type explicitly with something like request.contentType = 'application/json' or request.contentType = JSON_CONTENT_TYPE. For a list of the content type constants available in your unit tests see the "Testing Mime Type Handling" section under ...


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It looks like you've configured both files correctly. grailsApplication.config.app might be null simply because it is not a leaf node, have you tried grailsApplication.config.app.testvar.foo?


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You have two options. Leave the annotation as-is and throw a RuntimeException. The default behavior of @Transactional is to roll back the current transaction when a RuntimeException is encountered. This is not a great choice for obvious reasons. On the other hand, you could throw a checked exception from the action in question if errors are encountered. ...


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Are you looking to have an array of objects? If so, you may need to alter your server's getAllActivitiQueue method to return the data like this: [ {'userId':'FP301', 'taskId':'1', 'storeKey':'001E0', 'callKey':'12634'}, {'userId':'TS206', 'taskId':'2', 'storeKey':'00IAC', 'callKey':'12758'}, {'userId':'SN304', 'taskId':'3', 'storeKey':'00IAC', ...


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I solved the problem with post.save(flush: true) here is the documentation about gorm save


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So you need custom validator. Something like below should do the job. Take a look at Grails documentation - it's quite convenient. static constraints = { questionType validator: { val, obj -> !(val in [Type.Radio, Type.Checkbox, Type.Dropdown] && obj.choices.isEmpty()) } } But then you'll get error message generated by grails. ...


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I haven't test it but I think this should work: Person.withCriteria { createAlias 'history', 'h' ne 'team', h.team } You have to create an alias for the join with history. EDIT: Now I got it! With the following sample data: def t1 = new Team(name: 'team 1').save() def t2 = new Team(name: 'team 2').save() def t3 = new Team(name: 'team 3').save() ...


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You can stick them in the session, in a variable (say old-params) and have the second call use those if they are available.


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If you want to pass the native sql then you can also use spring jdbcTemplate. Configuration: import org.springframework.jdbc.core.JdbcTemplate beans = { .......... jdbcTemplate(JdbcTemplate) { dataSource = ref('dataSource') } } Controller: def jdbcTemplate List actionMethod(){ String query = "your pure native query example select ...


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It's difficult to answer without the domain classes but I think you have the following domain classes: class Committee { ... static hasMany = [members: CommitteeMembers] ... } class CommitteeMember { String name static belongsTo = [committee: Committee] } In this case, to persist a Committee with N CommitteeMembers you have to: ...



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