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0

How about something like: ... and: "an initial set of test values" (1..9).each { statementNo -> participant."statement$statementNo" = statement participant."statement${statementNo}Missing" = statementMissing } when: "the validator is invoked" def isValidConsentData = participant.validate() then: "the appropriate fields are flagged as ...


0

I am not familiar with Grails syntax, so I will offer a solution with pure JPA; you can translate it to Grails if you find it useful: select distinct d from Dealer d join d.vehicles v where v in (select b from Bus b where b.liabilityInsurance = foo) If you have more vehicles with liability insurance (other than Bus), you would preferably extend them from ...


0

Just seen in your profile you are from Philippines (PHT, GMT+8). Since 2015-07-01T16:00:00Z === 2015-07-02T00:00:00+08:00, the most likely cause is that you are using the PHT time zone to display the date when querying the database and the GMT/Zulu time zone when querying/displaying with groovy/grails.


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You could get this error if your using Open JDK instead Oracle JDK. Best option is to switch to the Oracle JDK and check the issue. There is an article which explain how to change the default JDK


0

Any exception thrown during a transaction, even if you catch it and deal with it, will cause the transaction to roll back. To get around this you have a couple of options: Perform a check before the point at which the exception is raised, and don't execute the offending code under conditions where you know it would throw an exception Do the transaction ...


1

I don't think you can do that in GORM, but you can use plain Hibernate with Grails. Add your classes in the src/groovy folder. One example, in src/groovy/example: package example import java.io.Serializable; import javax.persistence.Id import javax.persistence.Entity import javax.persistence.Table import javax.persistence.Column import ...


0

If you want to use resource plugin please comment the asset-pipeline plugin code from your BuildConfig.groovy file. And if you want to use asset-pipeline then just comment the resources plugin from the BuildConfig.groovy. Now see to it that you remove the tag from your layout as this will work only with resources plugin and is not required with ...


0

Documentation is poor, but I found this solution: includeTargets << grailsScript("_GrailsBootstrap") USAGE = """ grails script-name [PARAM] where PARAM = Description """ target (default: "command description") { //... }


1

You can create the named config in the test itself. For example: given: 'register marshaller' JSON.createNamedConfig('complete') { it.registerObjectMarshaller(Map) { Map item -> item } } and: 'create command object' def cmd = new UserByEmailCommand() when: 'controller action is called' controller.userByEmail(cmd) then: // assertion goes here


1

You can get the JDBC driver through this maven command. mvn install:install-file \ -Dfile=/lib/ojdbc7.jar \ -DgroupId=com.oracle \ -DartifactId=ojdbc7 \ -Dversion=12.1.0.1 \ -Dpackaging=jar \ -DgeneratePom=true


0

For what I can see from the code you posted, if you invoke url http://localhost:8080/test/api/secret, it should execute default action (maybe index) in SecretController but the controller you posted is called MyController. To investigate further, you should enable more verbose logging using log4j configuration as suggested in the doc ...


1

Just ran into this issue, here's what fixed it for me: url='jdbc:oracle:thin:@servername:PORT/servicename' It was the forward slash between the port and the service name that tripped me up. If you use a colon there, it reads it as a SID instead of a service name. Good luck!


1

hasOne indicates that there is a bi-directional one-to-one relationship where the child table has the parent's foreign key, as in your example. belongsTo is used to control cascades by indicating that the class belongs to the specified class. In your example, deleting a given Person would cascade the delete to any associated Addresses.


5

Person.getAll(3, 80, 5, 1) Here is how getAll() works. The result list will bear the same order as that of the id's in the list. It also accepts a list as an argument, so: Person.getAll([3, 80, 5, 1]) should be good, or in general: List ids = [3, 80, 5, 1] Person.getAll(*ids) should do as well.


0

Resolved by GUL Foreign key (FK_ must have same number of columns as the referenced primary key class RecoverySetup implements Serializable { static mapping = { table "recovery_setup" id composite: ["division", "peid", "orgkey"] columns { orgkey column: 'org_key', length: 8, sqlType: "char" oneSolName { column name: ...


2

I had a similar issue and I resolved mapping table in this way: class RecoverySetup implements Serializable { static mapping = { table "recovery_setup" id composite: ["division", "peid", "orgkey"] columns { orgkey column: 'org_key', length: 8, sqlType: "char" oneSolName { column name: ...


3

Ref: grails-doc You may use fragment (often called anchor tag). <g:link namespace="print" controller="home" action="terms" fragment="testValue">Terms &amp; Conditions</g:link>


0

Just a thought about "as String" .. if you redefine asType method: Date.metaClass.asType = { Class clazz -> return "Hello" } (new Date()) as String ===> Hello but still: new Date() ===> Wed Jul 01 20:12:35 EEST 2015


0

It looks like you might have to cast the map to JSON first (which would explain why its a string). See this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/2064341/1902587


0

Looks like adding grails.resources.rewrite.css = false can solve my problem. Found here.


0

See documentation : https://grails.github.io/grails-doc/latest/ref/Domain%20Classes/createCriteria.html count Returns the count of the given property name So you need to use rowCount() in projections Enjoy!)


0

You need to check parameter offset, and you need to update your query like this one: def totalsetlist = QuestionSet.createCriteria().list{ order("${params.order ?: 'id'}" maxResults(params.max) firstResult(params.offset ?: 0) } I didn't work with fetch, but I think you can do it by your self


0

I 'got around' this issue by adding an 'AssetService' to my Angularjs project. angular.module('myApp.assets') .service('AssetService', [ function () { this.getAssetDir = function() { return window.grailsSupport.assetsRoot; }; this.getRootDir = function() { return window.grailsSupport.root; }; }]); This requires some code ...


0

To handle 3rd party libraries, you can add flipcountdown folder inside assets folder, ├── assets │ ├── flipcountdown │ │ ├── admin │ │ └── global │ ├── images │ │ ├── apple-touch-icon.png │ │ ├── apple-touch-icon-retina.png │ │ ├── favicon.ico │ │ ├── grails_logo.png │ │ ├── skin │ ...


0

Here you can find a detailed example with Grails build-in Ajax support. You can also use JQuery (example here) EDIT: Your controller needs to look like this: import grails.converters.JSON class ExampleController { .... def searchItem() { def itemFound = MyService.searchP20Code(params["item"]) def resultMap = [:] ...


0

If you are writing unit tests you can put them under test/unit/resources and if you are writing integration tests you put them under test/integration/resources.


0

You can try to use formatters to convert the date field into the correct target type (or at least format it as in the example below). def dateFormatter = {_,value -> value?.format('dd-MM-yyyy hh:mm:ss:SSS')} def formatters = [dateField:dateFormatter] exportService.export("excel", new FileOutputStream(new File(pathFile + "BSE.xls")), bseRecordList, [:], ...


0

Use getRowClass method and add different class names for rows depending on 'Code' value. Refer the code shown below. viewConfig: { getRowClass: function(record, rowIndex, rp, ds){ if(record.get('Code')=="CustomerCode"){ return 'row-green'; } else { return 'row-red'; } } }, CSS ...


0

Although actual Oracle DB column type is CLOB, type:'text' didn't help when dbCreate is set to validate in DataSource.groovy. But this works for my Grails 2.2.0: static mapping = { stuff sqlType: 'clob' }


1

We use grails, tomcat, and elastic load balancers and have scripted instance startup / provisioning / deployment via AWS infrastructure. An S3 bucket contains our war file which is placed there by our Jenkins server as part of a plugin we configured. This is versioned by build number and Jenkins job name so we have one for each environment. A chef script ...


0

You must provide the back-ref to enable the cascading delete: class Shift { static belongsTo = [ schedule:Schedule ] } then you should be able to do schedule.delete() to remove also the shift-instances


0

Solved doing this: def shifts = schedules.shifts shifts*.delete()


0

DomainClass.findAll().each { it.delete() } If you want to avoid any GORM gotchas, such as needing to delete the object immediately and checking to make sure it actually gets deleted, add some arguments. DomainClass.findAll().each { it.delete(flush:true, failOnError:true) }


0

I think if you add: designation: { id: 123 } to your person JSON, that should do the trick.


0

Consider using grails chain. According to the docs: [Chain] uses flash storage to implicitly retain the model following an HTTP redirect from one action to another. and can be used as: def one() { chain action: 'two', model: [name: 'Tony', town: 'Birmingham'] } def two() { [name: 'Anthony', country: 'England'] }


1

yes this will be OK for meanwhile. But there are details missing. I'll post detailed instructions as soon as i get to the office. Actually there is a sample for mySql somewhere on the grails site, and from it it's pretty clear how to make same for an oracle DB. I just have created a new app and compared it with myne for oracle 11g. Here it is: ...


0

Did you checked if ${result.id} is correctly resolved in both variants? How looks the SQL? For Counting I prefer this: Message.createCriteria().count(){ eq ("code", "category.name.${result.id}") eq ("entityType",EntityType.APPLICATION_TEXT) }


0

I was facing a similar problem. I was getting the object via a dynamic method. Then passing a property to another method. In the other method I was again getting the object by a dynamic finder. I saved the domain object but it was not getting saved. I tried failOnError as well as flush but did not work. I passed the domain object instead of using dynamic ...


0

Firstly autowire at your controller: def grailsApplication then use below line to get entpointUrl: def endpointUrl=grailsApplication.config.grails.plugin.springsecurity.rest.login.endpointUrl I hope it will help you..


0

I had the same issue. Going into my virus scanner's settings and turning off outbound mail scanning solved the issue.


0

Ok, I figured it out. I extracted two lists from the JSON Array (results) and passed it to the GSP view like so.. def keys = []; def values = [] results.each { keys.add(it.get("id")) values.add(it.get("display_name")) } render(view: "main", model:[siteNameKeys:keys, siteNameValues:values]) And then I just passed these lists ...


0

Turns out to be a stupid question I had JAVA_OPTS=-Dblah.env=Something when I should have had set JAVA_OPTS=-Dblah.env=Something


0

Poi does have a high memory footprint. Please see: http://poi.apache.org/spreadsheet/index.html You can try SXSSF. SXSSF is an API-compatible streaming extension of XSSF to be used when very large spreadsheets have to be produced, and heap space is limited.


0

Unfortunately, cascade "all-delete-orphan", which sounds very appropriate, applies only to one-to-many relationships (I've just tested it on your scenario and it really doesn't work). I can't think of a more elegant way of handling this other than using the beforeDelete hibernate event on A to remove all the orphaned B's. Consider mapping the join table as ...


0

I ended up having to create a new Grails 2.3.4 project then copy all of my code from the old project over to the new project. This resolved my problem; I no longer had to run grails clean before running grails run-app. I still don't know what caused this issue, but I was handed this code and the previous developer had the same issue. My only guess at this ...


1

You should be able to do that with grails console


0

Following config works for me: elasticSearch.datastoreImpl = 'hibernateDatastore'


1

You can check before the render call, if the view file exists, like here. When it doesn't exist you can change the status code to 404, link. As far as I know it throws an NPE, because a toString() is called in org.codehaus.groovy.grails.web.metaclass.RenderDynamicMethod#renderView on a null map value, because the view doesn't exist.


0

I was having the same problem. I erroneously installed grails install-plugin ckeditor So I did grails uninstall-plugin ckeditor In BuildConfig.groovy, I removed version 4.4.1.0 and put: plugins { ... compile ":ckeditor:3.6.6.1.0" ... } It doesn't seem to work with 4.4.1.0. In main.gsp I put in the head section: ...


0

As you can see here you can add multiple dataSources to your domain Class. An Service can only have one DataSource, but you could make an Service for each DataSource and one Service that manage the request, like this: switch(Environment env){ case Environment.A: return dataSourceAService.method() case Environment.B: return ...



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