Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

46

From what I could find, it seems that some implementations of JavaScript just don't follow the spec on that point. From the MDN site: Note that decimal literals can start with a zero (0) followed by another decimal digit, but If the next digit after the leading 0 is smaller than 8, the number gets parsed as an octal number. This won't throw in ...


11

I believe it should actually be base-access: base . identifier type-argument-list_opt base [ expression-list ] ... which would make it just like member-access: member-access: primary-expression . identifier type-argument-list_opt predefined-type . identifier type-argument-list_opt qualified-alias-member . ...


8

Technically it could have gone either way, but there are many strong reasons to use semicolons. In programming languages, it's more common to see semicolons marking the ends of lines and commas separating things within a line (there are a few exceptions to this, like enums). Most TypeScript types are large enough that they span multiple lines, which makes ...


5

If you look at an ascii table you will find that the octal value 054 (decimal: 44) is a comma. You can find more on the Values, variables, and literals - JavaScript | MDN page that specifies: Table 2.1 JavaScript special characters Character   Meaning XXX           The character with the ...


4

The set of context-free languages is closed under the operation of string reversal, which is a mathematical way of saying that if you have a context-free language, then the language which consists of the same strings backwards is also context-free. The proof is simple, and is based precisely on the transformation indicated: take a context-free grammar and ...


4

LL(1) means that a parser can be constructed that uses a single token look-ahead, and in stmt, both assignment and subr_call start with ID so a parser cannot distinguish between the two cases just by looking at the first token (ID).


2

Lexer rules are matched from top to bottom. When 2 or more lexer rules match the same amount of characters, the one defined first will win. Because of that, a single digit integer will get matched as a DIGIT instead of a NUM. Try parsing the following instead: class Program { void main(){ return 33 + 55 ; } } which will be parsed just ...


2

The Oct code for , is 054. Check this Ascii Table Why you have to put "\" before that Oct code then?? From a quick search you'll find lots of solutions. But this one gave me a better clearification. Octal escape sequences Any character with a character code lower than 256 (i.e. any character in the extended ASCII range) can be escaped using its ...


2

FWIW, Grune & Jacobs' Parsing Techniques 2nd ed. 2008 (p. 68) defines reversal of a grammar differently (as turning lhs to rhs, start to a terminal and adding a new start), in terms of bottom-up and top-down parsing and production/reduction duality. However, can't see why a reversed string can't be parsed with the grammar reversed as you describe. If ...


1

You can use Append method with repeat: gb.Append(choices, 1, 10);


1

From the comments, you're fundamentally taking the wrong approach. You need to be using something like System.Speech.Recognition.DictationGrammar - which uses the Microsoft desktop SR engine. This will accept most English words. If you need to limit it to 1000 words, there are a couple of options. If your word list contains words that aren't in the ...


1

How about this? HELLO : 'hello' {_input.LA(1)!=' '}? ;


1

Using the hint that Terrance gives in his answer, I think this is what Roger is looking for: grammar UseLookahead; parserRule : LexerRule; LexerRule : .+? { (_input.LA(1) == 'X') && (_input.LA(2) == 'Y') && (_input.LA(3) == 'Z') }? ; This gives the answers required, hello and ...


1

If you want good performance, you need to use a form which does not use predicates. I would use code modeled after PositionAdjustingLexer.g4 to reset the position if the token ends with XYZ. Edit: Don't underestimate the performance hit of the answer using a semantic predicate. The predicate will be evaluated at least once for every character of your entire ...


1

Given your grammar, it is clearly ambiguous. Here, it doesn't define the preference between + and * operator. As you said, if you have to parse this 0110 + 110 * 01111, it can be done using two ways :- 0110 + 110 * 01111 ----> (0110 + 110) * 01111 0110 + 110 * 01111 ----> 0110 + (110 * 01111) So, this grammar is pretty ambiguous as it doesn't define ...


1

It is important to review other parts of your grammar to give a precise answer. I do not know if what I think is right, but from what I saw in your code, you could create a rule explicitly for the arguments in the order that you want without nesting one inside the other: args: | "(" simple_expression ")" args { /*Do something with $2*/ } | ...


1

You might be able to do this by playing games with precedence relations, but I think the most straightforward solution is to be clear. What you want to say is that callArgs cannot directly contain a callExpr. As in your example, if you want to pass a callExpr as an argument, you need to enclose it in parentheses, in which case it will match some other ...


1

Maybe you can try this: Pet: {Pet} (isFeline?='cat' | 'dog'); Normally it should do what you want!


1

If i generate your Grammar i get warning(200): ../org.xtext.example.mydsl4/src-gen/org/xtext/example/mydsl4/parser/antlr/internal/InternalMyDsl.g:297:1: Decision can match input such as "RULE_ANY_OTHER" using multiple alternatives: 1, 2 As a result, alternative(s) 2 were disabled for that input warning(200): ...


1

ANTLR is ready to accept 16-bit characters but, by default, many locales will read in characters as bytes (8 bits). You need to specify the appropriate encoding when you read from the file using the Java libraries. If you are using the TestRig, perhaps through alias/script grun, then use argument -encoding utf-8 or whatever. If you look at the source code of ...


1

Nope, just look at the parse trees produced by textbook grammar vs. suggested grammar (code). Note: parse trees represent derivations.


1

Why not do something like this: grammar T; parse : ( c_comment | plus_comment )* EOF ; c_comment : C_COMMENT ; plus_comment : PLUS_COMMENT ; PLUS_COMMENT : '/*' S* '+' .* '*/' ; C_COMMENT : '/*' .* '*/' ; SPACES : S+ {skip();} ; fragment S : ' ' | '\t' | '\r' | '\n' ; which will parse the input: /**/ /* + as*/ /* ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible