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4

See http://www.tutorialspoint.com/java/java_string_replaceall.htm You want to remove punctuation from a String. The easiest way is to use a regular expression to find the punctuation and replace all matches with nothing. String noPunctuation = foxes.replaceAll("[\.,:;'\"!\?]", ""); Simply include each symbol you want replaced inside your regular ...


3

When throw was added to the language in 1998 or so, there was a discussion about whether the throw statement required an expression or not. (The alternative would be that a throw without an expression rethrows the current exception object, as in certain other languages.) I can't find any record of this discussion, or of the final resolution -- although we ...


3

We can only guess here why the language authors decided to make it so, but I'd say it's for consistency with return. Both return ¶ value and throw ¶ value are forbidden if you want to complete with the value. That there would be no ambiguity for throw anyway doesn't matter.


2

I think adeneo's comment is on the right track: like return, the operand to throw is typically a valid expression on its own. The problem with return \n "valid on its own"; is one of the most common examples of ASI problems, so restricting return and any other statements taking a value like that is a reasonable safeguard. Looking at the list, most of those ...


2

The appelt priorities work only for the same regions of text (e.g. earlier match wins and longer match wins). Text consumed by a previous rule cannot be matched by a later rule... From the documentation: With the appelt style, only one rule can be fired for the same region of text, according to a set of priority rules. Priority operates in the ...


2

From a comment by Columbo, Of course a nested-name-specifier can be ::, and CC is the identifier, …? That is not the case, at least not in the context of this question. Up until the 2014 version of the C++ standard, a bare double semicolon did not qualify as a nested-name-specifier. The 2003 version of the standard said a nested-name-specifier took on ...


1

The cost of parsing a strict pre- (or post-) order expression is trivial, using either top-down or bottom-up techniques. It will be dwarfed by any of the other tasks, even lexical analysis. The tiny speed differences will be the result of implementation details rather than algorithmic strategy. There's no point in using an LR(1) parser, since you don't need ...


1

Assuming each POS has its own text file consisting of every possible word with that tag on a separate line, you just want to make a dictionary by reading in the lines: lexicon = {} with open('path/to/the/files/NNP.txt', 'r') as NNP_File: # 'with' automatically closes the file once you're done # now update the 'NNP' key in your lexicon with every ...


1

You can use a negative offset in the lookahead functions LA() and LT() (LA gives you just the token type, while LT gives you the entire token). Note: LA(0) is not defined, but you can use LA(-1), LA(-2), LT(5) etc. Another note: looking back further than one step works only with buffered token streams. Unbuffered streams only cache a single token (the ...


1

You don't show the definition of name_str in your scanner code, but it seems likely that it is an array of char. If that's the case, you are risking a buffer overrun since you never check to make sure that name_length is less than the buffer size; furthermore, you might as well use memcpy instead of strncpy because you already know there is no NUL character ...


1

I'm sorry for delay, this issue has been just fixed in trunk in revision 13217, please update and try again, it should work.



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