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3

This looks like a problem set question, so I won't give a full answer here. However, as a hint, try showing that the string a + a + a has two different parse trees. Hope this helps!


3

Since 1995, there is an ISO/IEC standard for Prolog: ISO/IEC 13211-1:1995. It also contains a grammar defining Prolog's syntax which consists of two levels: Token level: (6.4 Tokens, 6.5 Processor character set) These are defined by regular expressions and using the longest input match/eager consumer rule/greedy match/maximal munch like many languages of ...


3

#include <abc=> is valid in a C program. The text inside the <...> can be any member of the source character set except a newline and >. This means that most character sequences, including !? and <<<, could theoretically appear.


2

There isn't an "and" operator like that as such but you could do it with a set of contains checks: Rule: OrgTitlePer ({Sentence contains {Organization}, Sentence contains {JobTitle}, Sentence contains {Person}}):sent --> :sent.Interesting = {} When you have several constraints within the same set of braces that involve the same annotation type on ...


2

This is explained in the SableCC documentation, aka Étienne Gagnon's master's thesis: Unlike alternatives, elements have an obvious candidate for name which is the identifier of the element itself. This will work, as long as an element does not appear twice in the same alternative. In that case the current version SableCC requires a name for at least one ...


2

One thing I noticed is that you're not setting the Culture property of the GrammarBuilder. The Culture property of the GrammarBuilder must match that of the SpeechRecognitionEngine or else you won't get any recognitions. The Microsoft.Speech recognition engine doesn't support dictation, so that's not an option. The grammar you've supplied matches one ...


2

For SWI-Prolog in particular, things are a bit "complicated". It has never strictly conformed to ISO, and the current development version (SWI-Prolog 7 and beyond) has departed even further from ISO compliance. The development version is at the moment the only "actively" maintained version, meaning that soon you might expect bugs not to be removed from ...


2

At least, there is ISO standard (see its creator page).


2

Conflicts in your grammar mean that the grammar is not LALR(1). That may be due to the grammar being ambiguous or it may be due to the grammar requiring more than one token of lookahead. Whenever you have a conflict, bison resolves it by chosing one of the possible actions (either shift or reduce) based on the precedence directives you have. This results ...


2

It's a reserved keyword, see section 3.9 of the Java Language Specification.


1

In a top-down parser, the parser begins with the start symbol and tries to guess which productions to apply to reach the input string. To do so, top-down parsers need to use contextual clues from the input string to guide its guesswork. Most top-down parsers are directional parsers, which scan the input in some direction (typically, left to right) when ...


1

here says that in PEGs the choice operator is ordered to avoid CFGs ambiguities by using the first match. in your first example [data_type] succedes parsing id, so it fails when it founds : instead of another identifier. that may be because [data_type] behaves like (data_type | ε) so it will allways parse data_type with the first id. in [data_type ...


1

Rearranging the grammar slightly makes it work: root = atoms:atom+ { return atoms.join(''); } atom = variable / normalText variable = "_" first:$(variableSegment "_") rest:$(variableSegment "_")* { return '<>' + first + rest + '</>'; } variableSegment = seg:$[^\n_ ]+ normalText = normal:$[^\n] I'm not sure I understand why, exactly. ...


1

Fortunately, this can be written in CNF. Here is one such grammar: S → ε | n | NA N → n A → n | NA Therefore, the language is context-free. Hope this helps!


1

Your grammar is not LR(k) for any k. So you either need to fix the grammar or use a GLR parser. Suppose the input starts with: (((((((((((((x Up to here, there is no problem, because every character has been shifted onto the parser stack. But now what? At the next step, x must be reduced and the lookahead is ). If there is an = somewhere in the future, ...


1

Reduce/reduce conflicts often mean there is a fundamental problem in the grammar. The first step in resolving is to get the output file (bison -v example.y produces example.output). Bison 2.3 says (in part): state 7 4 Expr: Id . 6 Pattern: Id . '=' reduce using rule 6 (Pattern) ')' reduce using rule 4 (Expr) ')' ...


1

I've managed to narrow it down to the semic rule: /* This rule handles semicolons reported by the lexer and situations where the ECMA 3 specification states there should be semicolons automaticly inserted. The auto semicolons are not actually inserted but this rule behaves as if they were. In the following situations an ECMA 3 parser should auto insert ...


1

In addition to all the other quibbles, there are a variety of cases involving macros. The arguments to a macro expansion don't need to be syntactically correct, although of course they would need to be syntactically correct in the context of their expansion. But then, they might never be expanded: #include <errno.h> #define S_(a) #a #define ...


1

throw is a regular java keyword, which is used to "throw" an exceptionThrowable object. in my opinion, throw is not more magic or mysterious than break or continue....


1

throw is used to activate an Exception. throw new Exception("This is an exception"); You can also use Inheritance and make your own type of Exceptions and throw and handle them.



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