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4

Yes. This is a deliberate language feature, and not just something that happened to be the case. PEP 3099 explicitly rejected any changes to this for the Python 2 -> 3 transition (a notably bigger transition than any 3.x -> 3.y will be): The parser won't be more complex than LL(1). Simple is better than complex. This idea extends to the parser. ...


3

token.OP Is a generalization of the operator tokens. This is also mentioned in the tokenize module: To simplify token stream handling, all Operators and Delimiters tokens are returned using the generic token.OP token type. The exact type can be determined by checking the exact_type property on the named tuple returned from tokenize.tokenize(). ...


3

This is called a type witness, and it is referenced in the Type Inference trail: The generic method addBox defines one type parameter named U. Generally, a Java compiler can infer the type parameters of a generic method call. Consequently, in most cases, you do not have to specify them. For example, to invoke the generic method addBox, you can specify ...


2

The answers by @thequark and by @LittleBobbyTables work fine when used with ground strings. But what if they are not bounded in length, like in the following queries? ?- phrase(s(3),_). % expected: success % observed: no answer(s) ?- phrase(s(-10),_). % expected: failure % ...


2

I think your issues are due to the explicit definition of the rule for open and closing curly braces, but then referencing them in some of the parser rules as the string literal. By modifying the expression segment rule to only reference lexer rules, the issue seems to be resolved. Please try out this grammar and see if your issue is fixed expressionString: ...


1

There is no such mechanical procedure because the problem of determining whether a CFG defines a regular language is undecidable. This result is a simple application of Greibach's Thereom.


1

For lexer rules, the rule with the longest match wins, independent of rule ordering. If the match length is the same, then the first listed rule wins. To make rule order meaningful, reduce the possible match length of the ANY_STRING rule to be the same or less than any key word or id: ANY_STRING: ~( ' ' | '\n' | '\t' ) ; // also?: '\r' | '\f' | '_' ...


1

Could you not just leave memberAccessExpression, indexExpression and dictionaryAccessExpression as they are, so that callStatement can use them, end expand these rules inside lExpression: lExpression : simpleNameExpression | Me //instanceExpression 5.6.11 | lExpression '.' unrestrictedName | lExpression '(' argumentList ')' | ...


1

This looks like a problem that would be well suited for Treetop. I don't think I have enough information to be sure that it will work, but being able to combine regular expressions into a larger structure where each of the 29 elements can be managed and their information extracted/represented using any of Ruby's features as appropriate, seems like the sort ...


1

Dinesh thank you for the answer, your solution give me a conflict in JavaCC with (agent-postfix)*. I solved in this way: agent=agent2 agent' agent'= "where" agent_frame "end" agent' | epsilon agent2= agent3 agent2' agent2'= "+" agent3 agent2' | epsilon agent3= agent4 agent3' agent3'= "|" agent4 agent3' | epsilon agent4 = agent5 agent4' agent4'= "\" ...


1

Your asking the recognition engine to perform some tasks that it just doesn't do very well. Highly variable length list of short words (letters in this case). The Nuance engine, in my experience, didn't do this very well. I'm not sure which engines, if any, available today would be better, but I haven't experimented enough. Some of the newer, speaker ...


1

Inserting all those mid-rule actions (MRAs) into your grammar cripples the parser. Since you don't include the definitions of P1 and P2, it's hard to know why you need the MRAs, but it seems unlikely that it is actually necessary to, for example, execute a specific reduction action between the tokens IS and ENUMERATION, rather than executing the reduction ...


1

The error message indicates that you have a single white-space somewhere in your grammar used as a keyword. You have to remove that one.


1

You cannot count on the value of yytext outside of a flex action. Bison grammars typically read a lookahead token before deciding on how to proceed, so in a bison action, yytext has already been replaced with the token value of the lookahead token. (You can't count on that either, though: sometimes no lookahead token is needed.) So you need to make a copy ...


1

It depends on what you mean. If you scroll down the Wikipedia entry, you can see that, formally, cB → Bc does not fit the scheme, but it can be simulated by 4 rules that do fit it: c B → W B W B → W X W X → B X B X → B c So Aa → aA is not a CSG rule in itself, but the langue it generates is. Perhaps whoever told you it is, ...



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