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4

The lexer is using the maximal munch principle and will take as many characters as it can to form a valid token to avoid these types of ambiguity. We can confirm this by going to the draft C99 standard section 6.4 Lexical elements which says: If the input stream has been parsed into preprocessing tokens up to a given character, the next preprocessing ...


3

According to the C Standard 4 If the input stream has been parsed into preprocessing tokens up to a given character, the next preprocessing token is the longest sequence of characters that could constitute a preprocessing token. So there is no ambiguity. For example in this program #include <stdio.h> int main( void ) { int a = 1; ...


3

In the C# 5.0 spec, the grammar for the class-declaration production is introduced in section 10.1: 10.1 Class declarations A class-declaration is a type-declaration (ยง9.6) that declares a new class. class-declaration: attributes(opt) class-modifiers(opt) partial(opt) class identifier type-parameter-list(opt) class-base(opt) ...


2

The problem is with the concept of backtracking. PEG parsers don't backtrack like other recursive-descent parsers or Prolog do. Rather, when confronted with a choice, a PEG parser will try every option until one succeeds. Once one succeeds, it will commit to it no matter how the rule was invoked. From the Wikipedia article: Unlike in context-free ...


2

You should parse your input using the most relaxed grammar possible for your language. For example, if an integer is only allowed to have 6 digits, you should still create your Integer token with a rule like the following: Integer : [0-9]+ ; The lexer and parser would not contain any validation that the integer was less than or equal to 6 characters. ...


2

By including 'of' in a parser rule, ANTLR is creating an implicit anonymous token to represent that input. The word of will always have that special token type, so it will never have the type WORD. The only place it may appear in your parse tree is at a location where 'of' appears in a parser rule. You can prevent ANTLR from creating these anonymous token ...


2

I would personally write a grammar to generate a Java program for each script that you could then compile (along with your jar) and run independently... i.e., a 2-step process. For example, with something like the following simple grammar (which I haven't tested and I am sure you would need to extend and adapt), you could replace the parser.eval() statement ...


2

Easiest answer is to use antlr4 not 3, which has no problem with immediate left recursion. It automatically rewrites the grammar underneath the covers to do the right thing. There are plenty of examples. one could for example examine the Java grammar or my little blog entry on left recursive rules. If you are stuck with v3, then there are earlier versions ...


1

This will do it: STRING: ( ~[\t\r\n ] // non-whitespace | ' ' ~[\t\r\n ] // or single space followed by non-whitespace )+ ' '? // may optionally end in a space (if desired, remote the line otherwise) ;


1

I would simply evaluate the script on the fly, not generate Java source files which need to be compiled themselves again. With ANTLR 4 it is highly recommended to keep the grammar and target specific code separate from each other and put any target specific code inside a tree-listener or -visitor. I will give a quick demo how to use a listener. A grammar ...


1

The eval() in ExpParser is implemented through method calls; it's just that the calls have shortcut syntax in the form of operators. As an exercise, change ExpParser adding a Calculator class with (unimplemented) methods for mathematical operators, add(), multiply(), divide(), and so on, and then change the rules to use those methods instead of the ...


1

Are you sure that it's notequal_expression that is causing the issue? The nonterminal and rule that are not used, as I read it, are bool : BOOLEAN {} ; Perhaps instead of simple_expression : identifier | string ; you intended to code simple_expression : identifier | string | bool ;


1

Do something like this instead (check the inline comments I added): tokens { IS_NOT; // added NOT_IN; // added QUERY; INDEXES; } query : expr EOF -> ^(QUERY expr) ; expr : logical_expr ; logical_expr : equality_expr (logical_op^ equality_expr)* ; equality_expr : ID equality_op atom -> ...


1

Your approach is sound. Some parser generation tools have provisions for easily ignoring comments and whitespace. If that's not the case with the tool you're using, doing a comment-removal pass is reasonable, as it considerably simplifies the grammars for the other passes. The only reason I can think of for trying to unify the grammars is that you have a ...



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