Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

It does have a shift-reduce conflict. Here's the state machine produced by selecting shift. The conflict is in state 4. I should point out that your question is a bit off. A grammar can be unambiguous and still not LR(1). But this one happens to be provably ambiguous. Consider the string ddudu. Two leftmost derivations are ...


3

Your grammar is still ambiguous, so it can't be LL(1). This production F → -E makes it possible to mix an expression with lower precedence operators in a level (unary operator) where they shouldn't appear. Note that id + - id + id has two derivation trees. You shouldn't use E there, but a symbol that represents an atomic value. You could replace F → id ...


2

The JSON lexical grammar is used to translate character sequences into tokens and is similar to parts of the ECMAScript lexical grammar. The JSON syntactic grammar describes how sequences of tokens from the JSON lexical grammar can form syntactically correct JSON object descriptions. Lexical rules ("::") for tokens mean "what the parts of the language ...


2

Don't you mean IntTuple($2, $3) as opposed to B($2, $3)? I'd try IntTuple{x=$2; y=$3} EDIT: this works: module Ast type B = { x : int; y : int } type A = | Int of int | String of string | IntTuple of B and %{ open Ast %} %start a %token <string> STRING %token <System.Int32> INT %token ATOMTOKEN TUPLETOKEN %type < Ast.A ...


2

You have no whitespace rule so StringCharacter matches everything except quote and backslash chars (+ the escape sequenc). Include a whitespace rule to make it match individual AND/OR tokens. Additionally, I recommend to define lexer rules for string literals ('AND', 'OR') instead of embedding them in the (parser) rule(s). This way you not only get speaking ...


1

The problem here is that your original grammar is ambiguous. E → E + E E → P means that P + P + P can be parsed either as (P + P) + P or P + (P + P). Eliminating left recursion doesn't fix the ambiguity, so the modified grammar is also ambiguous. And ambiguous grammars can't be LL(k) (or, for that matter, LR(k)). So you need to make the grammar ...


1

This is due to an incompatible change in the latest Xtext release (2.8.0). I filed a ticket for that (https://bugs.eclipse.org/bugs/show_bug.cgi?id=464016) and already solved it. It will work fine again with Xtext 2.8.2 which will be released later this week.


1

You haven't pasted enough of your grammar to answer the question, but it is almost certainly related to the fact that var_part_multi can be empty. The question is what is the context of the use of var_part; specifically, how it is possible for var_part to be followed by something which starts with ID. In that case, since var_part_multi can be empty, the ...


1

The closest I can come is to put the test in the parser instead of the lexer. That's not exactly what you're asking for, but it does work. The trick is to use a semantic predicate before any string that must be tested for any Evil Characters. The actual testing is done in Java. grammar myTest; @header { import java.util.*; } @parser::members { ...


1

See Standard ECMA-262 5.1 Edition / June 2011/ 5.1.1 Context-Free Grammars A context-free grammar consists of a number of productions. Each production has an abstract symbol called a nonterminal as its left-hand side, and a sequence of zero or more nonterminal and terminal symbols as its right-hand side. For each grammar, the terminal ...


1

There is no better way. Either you want the whitespaces to get stripped out or not. You cannot get wet and stay dry at the same time. If you really want to enforce whitespaces between (certain) tokens then you have to take in WS everywhere, no way around that. Though, I question your intention. Usually it works very well to simply ignore whitespaces, except ...


1

I finally found the error. (may be useful for others) The %nonterm declarations for fundec and fundeclist were wrong. I was just omitting the token "of ..." to specify that fundec/ fundeclist actually have a value. Correct version: %nonterm fundec of A.fundec | fundeclist of A.fundec list My initial version: %nonterm fundec | fundeclist ...


1

The key issue for your specific problem is that when there is alternation in an EBNF rule, the parser for the nonterminal must call all the alternatives and ask each if it recognizes the construct; each subparser has to return a flag indicating yes or no. What you probably need are general principles for writing a recursive descent parser.


1

Yet a naive solution: StringSequence : (StringCharacter | NotAnd | NotOr)+ ; fragment NotAnd : 'AN' ~'D' | 'A' ~'N' ; fragment NotOr: 'O' ~('R') ; fragment StringCharacter : ~('O'|'A') ; Gets a bit more complex with Whitespace rules. Another solution would be with semantic predicates looking ahead and preventing the read of keywords.


1

This question has been around for a while and covers a topic that is is often visited by beginners in the subject. One often find that those who have done a compilers course in their undergraduate degree know that this is one of those questions that has no easy or single answer. You might have noticed that you have two questions on the same topic, neither of ...


1

This question has been around for a while and covers a topic that is is often visited by beginners in the subject. One often find that those who have done a compilers course in their undergraduate degree know that this is one of those questions that has no easy or single answer. You might have noticed that you have two questions on the same topic, neither of ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible