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11

You also need to consider CompoundType ::= AnnotType {‘with’ AnnotType} [Refinement] | Refinement Refinement ::= [nl] ‘{’ RefineStat {semi RefineStat} ‘}’ RefineStat ::= Dcl | ‘type’ TypeDef | informal description # can only follow a SimpleType, but {type λ[α] = Either[A, α]} is a ...


8

# requires SimpleType: SimpleType ‘#’ id However, { … } is a Refinement (see CompoundType), which is not SimpleType unless parenthesised (see ‘(’ Types ‘)’). So, the parse tree of ({type λ[α] = Either[A, α]})#λ is as follows: SimpleType ‘#’ id / \ ‘(’ Types ‘)’ 'λ' | Type = InfixType ...


5

The Regexp::Genex and String::Random modules expands regexes into strings that match the pattern.


3

You want to associate ground terms like x (no need to write 'x') with uninstantiated variables. Certainly that does not constitute a pure relation. So it is not that clear to me that you actually want this. And where do you get the list [x, &&, x] in the first place? You probably have some kind of tokenizer. If possible, try to associate variable ...


3

Yes, according to the official JSON spec double quotes (and only double quotes) are required around every string, including object keys. This is just one reason why JSON is a subset of the Javascript object literal notation, not a complete implementation.


3

Basically, that language is going to be difficult to express with an LR(1) grammar. It's not impossible, but the resulting grammar will not generate the parse trees you would want, so you'll need to post-process the AST. Also, it's really painful to write all the productions, so changing the grammar will be difficult. Unfortunately, GOLD parser does not ...


2

JavaCC produces top-down parsers. I'll say off the top that I'm not a fan of top-down parser generators, so I'm not a JavaCC expert and I don't have it handy to test. (Edit: I thought something else would work, but I realized afterwards that I don't understand how JavaCC attaches lookahead to actually choices; in the case of ( A | B )* C, there are actually ...


2

VP|<NP-PP> is one nonterminal symbol. The vertical bar does not mean multiple options in the traditional sense. Rather, NLTK puts it there to indicate where the rule is derived from, i.e. "this new nonterminal symbol was derived from the combination of VP and NP-PP." It is a new production rule NLTK has created to convert your grammar into Chomsky ...


2

For very simple cases like you mentioned in the comment—just three digits—that's just a small recursion, like here (processing only \d): use strict; use warnings; my %results = (); # global variables are evil sub generate { my ($pattern) = @_; if ( $pattern =~ /^(.*)\\d(.*)$/ ) { my ( $before, $after ) = ( $1, $2 ); for my ...


1

Not sure if you really want to do what you asked. You might do it by keeping a list of variable associations so that you would know when to reuse a variable and when to use a fresh one. This is an example of a greedy descent parser which would parse expressions with && and ||: parse(Exp, Bindings, NBindings)--> parseLeaf(LExp, Bindings, ...


1

Here is yet another approach. It has the advantage of identifying which commas indicate an undefined elements without using any semantic actions. void ArrayLiteral() : {} { "[" MoreArrayLiteral() } void MoreArrayLiteral() : {} { "]" | "," /* undefined item */ MoreArrayLiteral() | AssignmentExpression() ( "]" | "," MoreArrayLiteral() ) }


1

For the example you provide, I would prefer to use syntactic look ahead, which is in a sense necessarily "positive". The production for ExpressionStatement is not the place to tackle the problem as there is no choice. void ExpressionStatement() : {} { Expression() ";" } The problem will arise where there is a choice between an expression statement and a ...


1

Yes, that correctly captures the grammar presented. However, a better rewrite would be: "[" AssignmentExpression ? ( "," AssignmentExpression ? ) * "]" because the rewriting in the OP is not LL(1) -- you cannot distinguish the possibilities without reading the entire AssignmentExpression -- whereas with this one you can figure out which alternative to ...


1

You're probably over-thinking this; the language isn't really intended to be precise. (The grammar for t, on the other hand, is meant to be precise.) I'm not even sure how I would say that -- I think I would have said "syntactic construct" or "syntactic rule" --; he means that all you need to know about the language can be summarized in the recognition of a ...


1

A simple (and traditional) solution is to allow empty statements: program : statement | program '\n' statement statement: %empty | statement_type_1 | ... That doesn't quite provide the same parse tree, since it forces you to ignore an empty statement :) But it has the virtue of being simple. Otherwise, you're stuck with ...


1

I've tried NLTK, PyStatParser, Pattern. IMHO Pattern is best English parser introduced in above article. Because it supports pip install and There is a fancy document on the website (http://www.clips.ua.ac.be/pages/pattern-en). I couldn't find reasonable document for NLTK (And it gave me inaccurate result for me by its default. And I couldn't find how to ...


1

For 2), it can't be (4 - (2 - 1)), for this to be the case following the rule additive-expression: additive-expression - multiplicative-expression then 2 - 1 would have to be a multiplicative expression, an attempt to parse that way (if the grammar is unambiguous) will fail. This is why you can force that interpretation with parenthesis (like 4 - (2 - 1), ...


1

It's easiest to understand how bison precedence works if you understand how LR parsing works, since it's based on a simple modification of the LR algorithm. (Here, I'm just combining SLR, LALR and LR grammars, because the basic algorithm is the same.) An LR(1) machine has two possible classes of action: Reduce the right-hand side of the production which ...


1

If you want to use some class in the grammar (and therefore in the generated parser) you need to import all of them in the grammar with @parser::header { import packageName.ExprData; } And I'm not sure on what do you mean on how to instantiate? exprData is the return variable here, so you can assign to it by referring it from the action with $exprData. ...


1

I'd suggest introducing auxiliary non-terminal symbols: M5 = the number of a's plus 2 times the number of b's modulo 5 in w is 0 M4 = the number of a's plus 2 times the number of b's modulo 4 in w is 0 M3 = the number of a's plus 2 times the number of b's modulo 3 in w is 0 M2 = the number of a's plus 2 times the number of b's modulo 2 in w is 0 Then ...


1

Your left-recursion elimination of M is incomplete -- you forgot the rule NewPro → ε Once you add that, you're left with the problem of S, which is not ambiguous, but needs left factoring. Since FIRST(M) ⊆ FIRST(S), you need to first substitute M into S: S → noun | noun and noun | noun NewPro, noun, and noun and then you can left-factor ...


1

Found it myself: It seems that ANTLR chooses longest tokens first. So since LINE would always match a whole line it is always preferred. To still include some "joker" token into a grammar it should be a single symbol. In my case grammar TestLexer; file : line line; line : 'hello' ' ' 'world' '\n'; LINE : ~[\n]; would work.


1

The early meta compilers META II and TREEMETA and their kin are not exactly recursive decent parser. They were were stated as using recursive functions. That just meant they could call them selves. We do not call C a recursive language. A C or C++ function is recursive in the same way the early meta compilers are recursive. Recursion can be used. They were ...



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