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4

For your purposes, the grammar of types looks simple enough that you should be able to write a recursive descent parser that roughly matches the shape of your grammar. As a concrete example, let's say that we're recognizing a similar language. TYPE ::= PRIMITIVETYPE | TUPLETYPE PRIMITIVETYPE ::= 'int' TUPLETYPE ::= '(' ARGLIST ')' ARGLIST ::= TYPE ARGLIST ...


3

You can avoid += by using p[0] = ''.join(p) And for p[0] += p[1]+p[3]+p[5] you can do p[0] += ''.join(p[1::2])


2

You should be able to accomplish this with this error strategy class: internal class MyGrammarErrorStrategy : DefaultErrorStrategy { public override void Recover(Parser recognizer, RecognitionException e) { // This should should move the current position to the next 'END' token base.Recover(recognizer, e); ITokenStream ...


2

No, {} is not an expression in this case. Quoting the relevant parts of the annotated standard: http://es5.github.io/#x12.4 "An ExpressionStatement cannot start with an opening curly brace because that might make it ambiguous with a Block". In your case, {}/a/g is a block, followed by an expression statement consisting of a regular expression literal.


2

An operator grammar is a context-free grammar in which there are no consecutive non-terminals in any right-hand side. (Intuitively, every production has an operator, as in the grammar for mathematical expressions.) A operator precedence grammar is an operator grammar in which the parsing automaton can decide whether to shift or reduce based simply on a ...


2

In python when you have a list of strings, you usually want to use str.join, which is both simpler and more efficient. Here, you'd want something like: p[0] += ''.join( p[1:] ) Assuming that p[0] is already a string. If you need to concatenate particular tokens, your way of doing it is fine. It's a bit of a silly design on the part of ply to put ...


2

Grammars are equivalent to finite deterministic automata parsing and those are equivalent to regular expressions. So instead of external frameworks you can use Java's regular expressions for parsing the text: http://developer.android.com/reference/java/util/regex/Pattern.html If you want named regexps you can consider ...


2

So I've tested a bunch of languages in Sublime that have multiline comments (C/C++, Java, HTML, PHP, JavaScript), and none of the language syntaxes support multiline comments embedded in multiline comments - the syntax highlighting for the comment scope ends with the first "comment close" marker, not with symmetric markers. Now, this isn't to say that it's ...


2

Unambiguous grammars can have first/follow conflicts. Here's an example: S → Ab A → b | ε This grammar can produce two strings, bc and bbc, and it's unambiguous. However, there's a FIRST/FOLLOW conflict on production A → b | ε, because b ∈ FIRST(A) and b ∈ FOLLOW(A) as well. Hope this helps!


2

Bison does not support EBNF, only BNF, so if you want optional or grouped things, you'll have to write the rule yourself: character: '\'' character_char '\'' character_char: '\0' | '\t' | ... integer: opt_negate digits | '0' opt_negate: | '-' Also, note that " characters in bison don't denote literals, so won't do what you want (and are generally ...


1

You just need to introduce a layer between "AND" and "primary": logical_and = left:factor ws+ "&&" ws+ right:logical_and { return {type: "AND", left:left, right:right} } / factor factor = "!" ws* operand:factor { return {type: "NOT", operand: operand } } / primary Since ! is a unary operator, "left" and "right" don't really make sense; I ...


1

If you download just the database files from http://wordnet.princeton.edu/wordnet/download/current-version/ you can extract the words by running these commands: egrep -o "^[0-9]{8}\s[0-9]{2}\s[a-z]\s[0-9]{2}\s[a-zA-Z_]*\s" data.adj | cut -d ' ' -f 5 > conv.data.adj egrep -o "^[0-9]{8}\s[0-9]{2}\s[a-z]\s[0-9]{2}\s[a-zA-Z_]*\s" data.adv | cut -d ' ' -f 5 ...


1

Let's start at the beginning, which in the case of a bottom-up parser is the bottom. var_list is going to be a list of some kind, and it's going to have an append() method of some kind. It needs to be created where it first appears, which is the production var_list ::= VAR So the action there is going to be something like { $$ = new VariableList(); ...


1

I think in nonterminal list, you should have case_condition instead of condition. Your custom scanner ignores the indentation. It has to emit tokens for INDENT and DEDENT. I've found example in yacc. Then you can change your grammar to use those tokens. Your example generates shift/reduce conflict. Documentation says, that: Shift/reduce conflicts are ...


1

This is not a trivial task and there isn't even one right solution. I recommend you review the lecture notes for the class for which you should prepare the assignment and use a technique that was introduced there. If your grammar is context free, you can (after converting it into Chomsky normal form) use the Cocke–Younger–Kasami algorithm to check whether ...


1

You can do it like this: declaration returns [value] : 'enum' ID { $value = {'id': $ID.text, 'fields': []} } '{' (r=statement { $value['fields'].append($r.value) } )* '}' ; Or you can also pass your fields list to the statement ...


1

I think most case if not all can be handled with semantic lookahead. void PossiblyInsertedSemicolon() {} { LOOKAHEAD( {semicolonNeedsInserting()} ) {} | ";" } So where does a semicolon need inserting? When the next token is not a semicolon and is on the next line (getToken(1) != SEMICOLON && getToken(0).endLine == getToken(1).beginLine) ...


1

It's not correct, because it cannot generate the valid sentence: baaab which has one more a than b. It should be obvious that this sentence cannot be generated because every sentence generated by your language has different start and end characters. Edit The edited question is also not correct because the productions: S -> ... | aAa | a | ... A -> ...


1

If possible redesign your language so that the situation is unambiguous. This is why even Javascript has var. Otherwise you're going to need to disambiguate via semantic rules, for example that the first use of an identifier is its declaration. I don't see what the problem is with your case (2): just generate the appropriate code. If B and C haven't been ...


1

The usual way is to have a yacc/bison rule like: expr: ID { $$ = lookupId($1); } where the the lookupId function looks up a symbol in the symbol table and returns its type and value (or type and storage location if you're writing a compiler rather than a strict interpreter). Then, your other expr rules don't need to care whether their operands come from ...



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