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4

Some Prolog systems translate DCGs to clauses in a way that is different from the one in the answers by @repeat and @PauloMoura: direct unification of terminals with members of the list that is being analyzed/generated is replaced by a call to a predicate 'C'/3. For instance a(X) --> b(X), [x, y], c(X). is translated to a(A,B,C) :- b(A,B,D), ...


3

If your Prolog system provides an expand_term/2 built-in predicate, you can use usually to expand grammar rules into clauses. For example: ?- expand_term((a --> b, c), Clause). Clause = (a(_G1012, _G1013):-b(_G1012, _G1028), c(_G1028, _G1013)). For a bit more readable output (and for this purpose only), try: ?- expand_term((a --> b, c), Clause), ...


3

You are on the right track! Keep on going and you will get to something like this: expr(Xs0,Xs) :- % expr --> term(Xs0,Xs1), % term, addterm(Xs1,Xs). % addterm. addterm(Xs0,Xs) :- % addterm --> Xs0 = Xs. % []. ...


3

Not easily; ANTLR isn't really designed to do this. You can investigate StringTemplates, which will let you walk the tree and spit out code that is roughly right. If you want to regenerate the source in good detail, this isn't enough. See my SO answer on How to build a prettyprinter.


3

A more expansive definition of "syntax" would be the set of all ordered combinations of symbols which form a correct document, in the given language. Thus, "syntactic grammar" can be summarily described as the portion of the language's grammar that describes how various tokens can be ordered, to form meaningful phrases. Of course this folds back on your ...


2

Assuming that your lexer continues to be stateful, so that a single HTML token will be emitted for the text between END and BEGIN, there is little difference in the grammar. Aside from the first and last HTML token, every other HTML token will be preceded by END and followed by BEGIN. In other words, we have: html: END HTML BEGIN; The slight complication ...


2

The problem is that your grammar is ambiguous. For example 0 NAND 0 NAND 0 has at least two leftmost derivations: A => 0 A' => 0 NAND A A' => 0 NAND 0 A' A' => 0 NAND 0 NAND A A' A' => => 0 NAND 0 NAND 0 A' A' A' =>* 0 NAND 0 NAND 0 A => 0 A' => 0 NAND A A' => 0 NAND 0 A' A' => 0 NAND 0 A' => => 0 NAND 0 NAND A ...


2

Context sensitive means something quite different. If you were to use a more formal notation, you'd see that your original grammar was ambiguous, as Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams said, and your edited grammar could be handled fine by an LR(1) (or even LL(1)) parser generator. Here is an unproblematic bison grammar: %start number %% digit : '0' | '1' | '2' | '3' | ...


2

No, this grammar is not SLR. It is ambiguous. Left recursion is not a problem for LR parsers. Left recursion elimination is only necessary for LL parsers.


2

Use lexical modes to separately handle JQuery and Java blocks (even though the Java blocks are trivial in your case). Note, lexer modes are only available in Lexer grammars and not in combined grammars. Also, the Java catchall must match a single character at a time. Otherwise it can consume the JQuery begin sequence (this is likely the source of the ...


1

The problem cannot be solved in the lexer, since the lexer does always return one token type for the same string. But it would be quite easy to resolve it in the parser. Just rewrite the rules lower case: equals : '=' ; op :'|=' | '*=' | '~=' | '$=' | '=' | '!=' | '^=' ;


1

Pairwise Disjoint As far as I know, the only way to check if a set is pairwise disjoint is to enumerate every possible pair and check for matches. Note that this does not follow the racket syntax, but the meaning should still be pretty clear. (define (contains-match? x lst) (cond ((null? x) #f) ; Nothing to do ((null? lst) #f) ...


1

Data Types If you have Terminals and Non-Terminals, why not make data-types for each? In #lang racket the way to introduce new data type is with struct. ;; A Terminal is just has a name. (struct Terminal (name)) ;; A Non-terminal has a name and a list of terms ;; The list of terms may contain Terminals, Non-Terminals, or both. (struct Non-terminal (name ...


1

Perhaps I'm misunderstanding something here, but it seems to me that you want to represent an EBNF as a piece of data. If this is the case, you could simply use an s-expression. Something like this, perhaps? #lang racket (define my-ebnf `((A (a A b)) (Q (z z Q z)) (T (A p Q))))


1

I recommend taking a look at this classic, recursive descent parser: http://www.cs.indiana.edu/eip/compile/scan-numlist.ss The example consists of a lexer for a small Scheme subset. It was used for he the Scheme compiler workshop in 1996. http://www.cs.indiana.edu/eip/compile/


1

Your formula rule seems to be causing the issue here: LEFT_PAREN formula RIGHT_PAREN OR LEFT_PAREN formulaConjunction RIGHT_PAREN. That's saying that only formulas of the form (FORMULA)|(CONJUNCTIVE) will be accepted by the language. Instead, specify precedence rules for each operator, and use a nonterminal for each level of precedence. For example, your ...


1

Solution is to create and load grammar that is similar to the word / grammar / speech you want to use, this will increase accuracy. Then to evaluate hypothesized trigger 1, trigger 2 and then recognized confidence levels and result text. Not very practical as this would be different for each person / user. There is no way to prevent the .NET Speech ...


1

You can. Just use semantic actions with phx::bind: namespace phx = boost::phoenix; switch_cp = qi::int_ [ phx::bind(&MyGrammar::_codepage, this) = _1 ]; However, keep in mind that ruins reentrancy: don't use it if the related rules can be nested. Alternatively, calling methods would look like: e.g. switch_cp = qi::int_ [ ...


1

As written, the grammar is ambiguous because there is no way to distinguish the operator ++ from two instances of +. Normally, this problem is resolved in the lexical scanner using the "maximal munch" rule, so that the expression a+++b would broken into the lexical items ID PLUSPLUS PLUS ID, resulting in the parse (a++) + b. In that case, if the user ...


1

Is there any reason inherent to the design of the VHDL language, why the following can not be done? process (clk) variable b : std_logic_vector(15 downto 0); -- This would be nice, but is not permitted: signal c : std_logic_vector(15 downto 0); begin (Declare a signal in a process.) How would you resolve visibility? A process ...


1

Yes you should be able to do it and no you cannot and I don't believe VHDL2008 is fixing it (but a lot of awesome things are being fixed/added in VHDL2008). You can use always true generate statements (as already mentioned in a comment). Although if your using always true generate statements your module is probably to big and you should break it up. I did ...


1

First, Let's talk about import. What import does is similar to #include in C/C++ language, which is copying the src to dst. ANTLR4 will try to merge some the two grammar if there are some conflicts. Using import is kind of frastrating because there are so many constraints: Not every kind of grammar can import every other kind of grammar. Lexer grammars ...


1

The body of your first clause is a list and this is taken by Prolog systems as being a call to the predefined predicate consult used to open files and loading their contents as programs. This is not what you want... The head of the clause seems to indicate you want to have a predicate for each non-terminal (class name) of the EBNF. If that is the case you ...


1

I've found the following answer here: http://www.mersenneforum.org/showthread.php?t=11676 S→LAYR ZA→aAZ Za→aZ ZR→AAYR aY→Ya AY→YA LY→LZ YR→X aX→Xa AX→Xa LX→ε Since n^2 =\sum_{i=1}^{n} (2i-1), at any instance, for n=i, we have (i-1)^2 A's and (2i-1) a's. For n=i+1, all the A's are converted into a's, and goes ahead. Though I have not ...


1

The basic problem is that an ltl can match a parenthesized lexpr in two ways: ltl ltl / | \ | TLPAREN ltl TRPAREN formula | | formula lexpr | | ...


1

The issue here has to do with precedence in the lexer grammar. Because ANY_WORD is listed before CAPITAL_WORD, it is given higher precedence. The lexer will identify Hello as a CAPITAL_WORD, but since an ANY_WORD can be just a CAPITAL_WORD, and the lexer is set up to prefer ANY_WORD, it will output the token ANY_WORD. The parser acts on the output of the ...


1

Your grammar is correct, as far as I can tell. On my machine using Antlr4, I tested a = 12 through your kvpair rule, and it parsed fine. As far as I can tell by visual inspection, your code should work on previous versions of Antlr as well. I would try deleting all your Antlr generated files, and rebuilding the grammar to see if that is your issue.


1

Have to build both the lexer and parser. Here is a simple test rig builder: @echo off rem Execute the Antlr compiler/generator tool rem put grammar files in "D:/DevFiles/Java/src/test/parser" SETLOCAL set files=../UsefulLexer.g4 ../UsefulParser.g4 set CLASSPATH=D:/DevFiles/Java/lib/antlr-4.5-complete.jar set tool=org.antlr.v4.Tool set cmd="C:/Program ...


1

array: [] | [ elements ] elements: value | value , elements it seems not LL(1) to me. Clear cannot parse on "value"


1

You still have a lot of work to do. When you say that it works for DATA: PROGRAM: add, well, it does not: you have been bitten by a "feature" for Lex: unrecognized characters are printed on the standard output. So: tell Flex you don't want unknown characters to pass-through. %option nodefault you need to teach Bison that tokens such as "DATA:" will be ...



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