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65

Parsing C++ is getting hard. Parsing Java is getting to be just as hard. See this SO answer discussing why C (and C++) is "hard" to parse. The short summary is that C and C++ grammars are inherently ambiguous; they will give you multiple parses and you must use context to resolve the ambiguities. People then make the mistake of assuming you have to ...


6

with open('/dev/null') as x^y|z: pass Yes, this code is valid according to the grammar! Otherwise you'd get a parse error ("invalid syntax"). The parser proper is fine with this syntax, it's another part of the compiler that checks that such expression is not allowed on the left side (because as is semantically equivalent to the assignment). The reason ...


5

Officially: Because there's specific handling for it in the HTML spec. E.g., it's a "by fait" thing. It's not a JavaScript thing, you won't find it in the JavaScript grammar. Unofficially, it would appear that at least some JavaScript engines handle it intrinsically, sometimes in ways that make what I believe is valid JavaScript invalid. For instance, on V8 ...


4

It seems to be a bug in the specification. Quoting from the bug report linked to above (third point in the description): The grammar doesn't define any production for the following expression: new java.security.Permissions() This is a side-effect of removing TypeDeclSpecifier in 4.3, as it interacted poorly with type annotations. The JSR 308 ...


4

Following the algorithm you linked to, you want A -> Aα | β and you have E -> E [ E ] | id so A is E, α is [ E ] and β is id. The result of removing left recursion is A -> β A' and A' -> ε | α A', so you get the rules: E -> id E' E' -> ε | [ E ] E' So it looks like you got the right result, you just ...


3

Is int *something[3] an array of three pointers or a pointer to an array of three ints? How about int **something[3]? A simplified C grammar from the C standard's Appendix A includes: (Many productions omitted) declarator: pointeropt direct-declarator pointer: '*' | '*' pointer direct-declarator: identifier '(' declarator ')' ...


3

First, immediate, response: "I'm trying to pass semantic action in a grammar's inherited argument." instant traumatic shock. You... you... what?! C++ is not very good for higher order programming, certainly not with static polymorphism based on expression templates. In fact it is, but in my previous answer I already cautioned against UB when storing ...


2

Here's an example approach: expr -> addExpr; addExpr -> multExpr '+' multExpr | multExpr '-' multExpr; multExpr -> terminalExpr '*' terminalExpr | terminalExpr '/' terminalExpr; terminalExpr -> integer | variable | '(' expr ')'; This grammar defines the operators * and / as having more precedence as + and -. You declare the operation with ...


2

This is much easier to do with pen and paper. Among all the possibilities, I list three possibilities find by deriving the initial symbol S. S -> SbS -> abS -> abScS -> abacS -> abaca S -> ScS -> Sca -> SbSca -> abSca -> abaca S -> SbS -> SbScS -> abScS -> abSca -> abaca There are others, that's not hard to ...


2

This is explained in the Antlr4 "Getting Started" page. Doing it by hand is as simple as this: $ antlr4 YourGrammar.g4 $ javac YourGrammar*.java ... assuming that you have installed and configured a Java JDK and Antlr. There are a number of ways to use Antrlr with the Netbeans IDE: Just write / generate an Ant build script, and then modify it to ...


2

It’s simply a matter of definition; for languages the grammar does the job. Attribute references are defined at a much broader level than floating point literals. So from a grammar level, the parser has to recognize 1. as a floating point literal and not as a attribute reference. Of course, the parser itself could backtrack when reaching the _ and try to ...


2

The lexer is very simple, and will not backtrack. Language parsers are often divided into a lexing phase and a parsing phase, or a lexer and a parser. The lexer breaks the character stream into tokens, and then the parser determines a program structure from the tokens. The lexer sees four tokens: 1., __hash__, (, ): float, identifier, open-paren, ...


2

The Java Language Specification states If the form is MethodName - that is, just an Identifier - then: Otherwise, let T be the enclosing type declaration of which the method is a member, and let n be an integer such that T is the n'th lexically enclosing type declaration of the class whose declaration immediately contains the method ...


2

Sure. This is closely related to the famed Nabialek Trick. And the enabling mechanism is qi::lazy: pair = -matches[lazy(_r1)] >> -('=' >> -value); I also add #define BOOST_SPIRIT_USE_PHOENIX_V3 (which you may not explicitly have to set, depending on compiler/boost version). Live On Coliru #define BOOST_SPIRIT_USE_PHOENIX_V3 #include ...


1

It is defined by the W3's docs for the user agents: The JavaScript engine allows the string "<!--" to occur at the start of a SCRIPT element, and ignores further characters until the end of the line. So browsers follow these standards


1

They are in fact equivalent, but this is a strange way of converting one to the other. R is the same as (a|b)b*. M recognizes (a|b)(bb)*b?. The right part recognizes 2*n+1 or 2*n b's, where n>=0, hence is equivalent to R. Now on G A recognizes (bb)*b?, which is equivalent to b* (see comment on M). B recognizes bB|bb*|e which is equivalent to bB|b* ...


1

You must understand that the tokens are not created based on what the parser is trying to match. The lexer tries to match as much characters as possible (independently from that parser!): your Text token should be defined differently. You could let the Text rule become a parser rule instead, and match single char tokens like this: grammar Token; prog : ...


1

Back in 2001 I wrote a C++ library that will generate a parser from rules specified at run-time. It is available on SourceForge as project BuildParse with a LGPL license. I've used it in a couple of other projects, and I updated it to work with C++ as of 2009. If it doesn't matter if the parser is fast, it might work for you or save you some work rolling ...


1

Read carefully, it says Whitespace is needed between two tokens only if their concatenation could otherwise be interpreted as a different token (e.g., ab is one token, but a b is two tokens). 1.__hash__() is tokenized as: import io, tokenize for token in tokenize.tokenize(io.BytesIO(b"1.__hash__()").read): print(token.string) #>>> utf-8 ...


1

Here is a grammar you may use: <grammar mode="dtmf" version="1.0" root="oneToFiveSequence"> <rule id="onetofive"> <one-of> <item>1</item> <item>2</item> <item>3</item> <item>4</item> <item>5</item> ...


1

The generated parse tree visitor extends AbstractParseTreeVisitor, which has two methods which would be helpful to override to get the result you are looking for. Firstly, AbstractParseTreeVisitor#defaultResult() returns the default result for every node in the parse tree you visit. By default, it returns null. Second, ...


1

There's at least one case where they aren't equivalent. For example, this code void doStuff(){} void test(){ Runnable r = new Runnable(){ @Override public void run(){ doStuff(); } }; r.run() } Is perfectly valid, while this void doStuff(){} void test(){ Runnable r = new Runnable(){ @Override ...



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