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5

Use clojure.lang.RT to require clojure.edn and use clojure.edn/read to get a Clojure data structure from a source string or file without evaluating it. A guide to using clojure.lang.RT from Java.


5

Syntactically, a declaration can be a statement; specifically, it's a declaration-statement. (I say "can be" because not all declarations are statements. For example, a declaration at file scope, where a statement cannot legally appear, is not a statement.) Since the syntax of an if statement is: if ( condition ) statement or if ( condition ) statement ...


2

It's certainly possible to write a grammar for this language, but it won't be a context-free grammar. That's easy to demonstrate using the pumping lemma. The pumping lemma states that for any CFL, there is some integer p such that any string s in the language whose length is at least p can be written as uvxyz, where u, v, x, y and z are strings and vy is ...


2

S -> aSb | bSa | SS | ϵ If I’m not completely wrong here, the only issue here is the left recursion of S, so if you remove that, you should be fine: S -> S' S' S' -> aSb | bSa | ϵ This should also eliminate ambiguity. An alternative solution could be this: S -> aSbS | bSaS | ϵ


1

You can nest Choices objects by going through an intermediate GrammarBuilder object. The Choices object has a constructor that takes an array of GrammarBuilders, and the GramarBuilder object has a constructor that takes a Choices object. You'll probably want to use SemanticResultKeys and SemanticValues so that you can figure out what was actually said, ...


1

Following along with an answer I posted several months ago, I offer this suggestion. Realize that I'm leaving out the SpeechFactory class and much of the MySpeechMethods class, please copy it from the other answer. Also, as noted in the other answer, you'll have to do some error handling. With that caveat, you would modify your own code this way. ...


1

Because your grammar allows for statement block without being grouped by {...}, you've got yourself a classic dangling else ambiguity. Short explanation. The input: if expr1 if expr2 ... else ... could be parsed as: Parse 1 if expr1 if expr2 ... else ... but also as this: Parse 2 if expr1 if expr2 ... else ...


1

You can use a multi-mode lexer for this. Since the file starts with freeform text, the default mode will be the one to contain your TEXT rule. lexer grammar MyLexer; TEXT : ( ~'{' | '{' {_input.LA(1) != '{'}? )+ ; OPEN_TAG : '{{' -> pushMode(InTag) ; mode InTag; END_TAG : '}}' -> popMode ; // other rules for tokens ...


1

As written, the grammar is ambiguous, as NotRec will match 0 or more T_NOT or T_MINUS tokens, so if you have an Expr which has no such tokens before the Term, it can be matched by either rule 1 or rule 2. If you remove the NotRec: /*empty*/ rule, then NotRec becomes useless as it won't match any finite sequence of tokens. This changes the language, ...


1

How about s --> [1],oddOnesEvenZeros. s --> [0],oddZerosEvenOnes. oddOnesEvenZeros--> []. oddOnesEvenZeros--> [1],s. oddOnesEvenZeros--> [0],oddZerosOddOnes. oddZerosEvenOnes--> [1],oddZerosOddOnes. oddZerosEvenOnes--> [0],s. oddZerosOddOnes --> [1],oddZerosEvenOnes. oddZerosOddOnes --> [0],oddOnesEvenZeros. The grammar is ...


1

You have a recursion on rule OPTIONS. The conflit exists because there are two ways to stop that recursion. Look, for instance, if you have just One option, there are two different parsing trees. OPTIONS or OPTIONS | | \ OPTION OPTIONS OPTION | ...


1

I had good experiences with grako. I used it for parseWKT. It takes a EBNF as input and generates a PEG parser from it. I think it would be reasonable simple to write a BNF to EBNF Parser in grako, which would then generate a parser from the EBNF


1

Three completely unrelated questions here The rule list: list '\n' allows it to accept (and ignore) blank lines in the input. Without it, any blank line would cause a syntax error. The format specifier %.8g mean print a double argument with 8 digits of precision, using either normal or scientific notation, depending on what the exponent is. If you want to ...


1

You're using way too many lexer rules. When you're defining a token like this: BODY : TERMSPAN COMMA TERMSPAN COMMA SLOP COMMA ORDERED ; then the tokenizer (lexer) will try to create the (single!) token: xxx,xxx,5,true. E.g. it does not allow any space in between it. Lexer rules (the ones starting with a capital) should really be the "atoms" of ...


1

Multiple problems appear in this rule: piExp returns [double value] : p1=multiplyExp {$value = $p1.value;} ('pi' p1=multiplyExp {$value = ($p1.value-$p1.value)+Math.PI;} )* ; The way this rule is structured, to get the value π you need to use an expression like 3pi4, i.e. pi is written as a binary operator instead of a primary ...


1

You can construct a PDA that recognizes the language like this: The characters a and b in the input correspond to a on the stack. The characters c and d correspond to c on the stack. If the stack is empty or the top is a, and a is on the input, consume it and push a to the stack. If the stack is empty or the top is a, and b is on the input, consume it and ...



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