New answers tagged

1

Generic argument clauses for member expressions of modules It is possible that the generic-argument-clause only has a use case for modules (SomeModule.SomeGeneric<SomeType>()). From the Language Reference - Expressions: Explicit Member Expression An explicit member expression allows access to the members of a named type, a tuple, or a ...


1

Version 2.8 of Xtext comes with support for Whitespace-Aware Languages. This version ships with the "Home Automation Example" that you can use as a template.


0

It's Really Simple. For G1: First (bSa) intersection First(aSb) intersection First(ba) Is empty so Not LL(1). For G2 you do ...


2

The One True Grammar First, understand that the grammar you reference (JLS 7 Chapter 18) isn't actually "The Java 7 syntax specification" (e.g. The One True Grammar). It is a grammar that describes the Java 7 syntax. There are others, including the one in preceding chapters of the same JLS document. The JLS itself clarifies this in section 2.3, The ...


1

You can't use a 'generic match character', such as '-', in a receive. So, just declare a variable, as such: active proctype Receive () { Msg r; byte ignore do :: atomic { (pipe?[1,2]) -> printf("Receive"); pipe?r; } :: atomic { (pipe?[ignore,2]) -> printf("Receive2"); pipe?r; } od } It compiles: $ ...


0

Here is something to get you started: https://jsfiddle.net/nuettt29/3/ You can see that using dragula you can create a bank-like functionality that allows users to drag in elements. var choices = [' a>12 ', ' b<13 ', ' NOT a ', ' NOT b ']; var connections = [' AND ', ' OR ']; choices.forEach(function(choice) { var li = ...


0

eval() function will help you to convert string to Javascript expression, you just need to group your conditions based on user selection (and/or).


0

If you want to split lexer and parser. Lexer: lexer grammar HelloLexer; Hello : 'hello' ; ID : [a-z]+ ; // match lower-case identifiers WS : [ \t\r\n]+ -> skip ; // skip spaces, tabs, newlines Parser: parser grammar HelloParser; options { tokenVocab=HelloLexer; } r : Hello ID ; Remember to name the files HelloLexer.g4 and ...


0

You are trying to build a computer algebra system. Your task is conceptually simple: Define a lexer for the atoms of your "boolean" expressions Define a parser for propositional logic in terms of the lexemes Build a tree that stores the expressions Define procedures that implement logical equivalences (DeMorgan's theorem is one), that find a place in the ...


1

First one will generate (ab)^i, and you just want even numbers of ab pairs in words, so you have to define it as S -> ababA A -> ababA | c You also have to use A on the right hand side, in the second rule, as your rules will create a word of max length 5. Second one S -> AbbB A -> aAb | epsilon (empty string) B -> aAb For the first ...


4

The simple answer is that you just build the tree in your semantic actions, with rules like this: expr: expr '+' expr { $0 = make_op_node(OP_ADD, $1, $3); } That would be backed by an implementation function like: Node* make_op_node(enum OP opcode, Node* left, Node* right) { Node* rv = malloc(sizeof *rv); rv->opcode = opcode; rv->left = ...


4

Your text and your grammar don't quite line up. Or maybe I'm not understanding your text correctly. You say: on the left side, functions can be defined by assigning to them (an identifier followed by a list of identifiers - assignment_expression and identifier_list in the grammar) In my head, I imagine an example of that to be something like: comb(n, ...


0

1) The question is about modifying the grammar to obtain a new language; so don't modify directly the language… Your grammar generates the empty word because of the production: S -> λ So you could think of removing this production altogether. This yields the following grammar: S -> SS S -> aSb S -> bSa Unfortunately, this grammar doesn't ...


1

"Arguments" is the correct term for what is passed to a function. An operand is one type of argument, generally associated with a particular operation, such as arithmetic computations. Do you have more context for us, such as the full text of the question, and perhaps some context of the course?


0

"I think that is not intuitive and therefore not correct." Perhaps. But often intuition is in the eye of the beholder, and a precise specification is always more useful than "the parser does the intuitive thing". (Unless you like Perl, I suppose. But then you need the correct intuitions.) Having said that, I can't find a precise specification of the pcap ...


0

While not in BNF, EBNF does have the except-symbol (typically defined as "-"). In your case, the syntax would be: alphaNum="a"|"b"|...|"z"|"0"|"1"|...|"9"|"A"|...|"Z"; S= (alphaNum,{alphaNum}) - "foo"; Or if you want it to be case insensitive: foo="f"|"F","o"|"O","o"|"O"; alphaNum="a"|"b"|...|"z"|"0"|"1"|...|"9"|"A"|...|"Z"; S= (alphaNum,{alphaNum}) - ...


1

Some questions that are undecidable for wider classes of grammars become decidable for context-free grammars Language equality is one of the questions that open in cs and not decidable.. but in this case, you can actually build G1' as Greinbach normal form by Sheila Greibach, then you can prove L(G2)=L(G1') by the use of SUBSTITUTION (in order to change ...


0

You actually can't. It's undecidable. You can show that the problem of determining whether a grammar generates Σ* is undecidable. This means that it's undecidable to test whether two grammars produce the same language, because you could build a grammar for Σ* and testing whether another grammar generates the same language would then let ...


0

What is you want is called a structure editor. Such an editor knows the grammar of the language you want to work with, and works with an AST for program rather than text. What you see in the Editor window is a rendering of the AST as surface syntax text. Your cursor selects an AST node by virtue of being nearest to text from that AST node. Given a ...


0

This is the gist of what he was looking for (excluding the output; he didn't care about that one): Stack: Input String: S# dbbe# <- S->ABe ABe# dbbe# <- A->db dbBe# dbbe# <- Pop off matching 'd' at beginning of stack and string bBe# bbe# <- Pop off the matching 'b's... Be# ...


4

Fyodor Soikin's answer explains why func1 and func2 are logically the same. However, I don't want you to come away from this thinking that there is some magical language feature called "partial application". To stretch your mind, you need to understand how this arises from how functions work in OCaml. In the ML languages, there is no such thing as a ...


1

The semantics of _localctx in a predicate are not defined. Allowable behavior includes, but is not limited to the following (and may change during any release): Failing to compile (no identifier with that name) Using the wrong context object Not having a context object (null) To reference the context of the current rule from within a predicate, you need ...


6

When func1 is called with one argument, it returns another function, let's call it func3: let func3 = func1 awksub_rules At this point, there is no argument x yet. This new function still expects this argument to be passed in. When you call this new function, you will pass in the value of x, and the computation will commence: let result = func3 Num I ...


0

Well, sorry to have bothered anyone looking at my question, but I found an answer myself, using python magic. Maybe that can help someone someday. I reworked parameter[n] to take as input either an int or a tuple: parameter[n] locals[i = 1] : '[' NUM ( ',' NUM {$i += 1} )* ']' {($i == $n or $i in $n)}? ; Note the parenthesis in ...


1

It's usually a lot easier to convert a finite automaton for a regular language into a regular grammar than it is to convert a regular expression into a regular grammar. I'd recommend starting off by building an automaton for the regular expression - either manually or by applying Thompson's algorithm to mechanically convert the regex to an automaton - and ...



Top 50 recent answers are included