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Constructing an equivalent Regular Grammar from a Regular Expression First, I start with some simple rules to construct Regular Grammar(RG) from Regular Expression(RE). I am writing rules for Right Linear Grammar (leaving as an exercise to write similar rules for Left Linear Grammar) NOTE: Capital letters are used for variables, and small for terminals ...


5

This seems like a problem related to finite state automata and I don't remember everything from my coursework, but I wrote a CYK parser in OCaml, so I'll go ahead and take a shot :) If you're trying to parse an expression like 3- -4 for example, you would have your S -> K S rule consume the -4 and then your A -> O S rule would absorb the - -4. This ...


4

How to write grammar for formal language? Before read my this answer you should read first: Tips for creating Context free grammars. Grammar for {an bm | n,m = 0,1,2,..., n <= 2m } What is you language L = {an bm | n,m = 0,1,2,..., n <= 2m } description? Language description: The language L is consist of set of all strings in which ...


4

To explain what a production is I'd like to introduce a bit of context first. The dragon book states that a context free grammar has 4 components: a set of terminal symbols (tokens) a set of non-terminal symbols (syntactic variables) a set of productions of the form: non-term --> sequence of terminals and non-terminals a non-terminal symbol designated as ...


4

The most straightforward way to do that is to replace every EBNF construct with a new rule. Here are the equivalences you can use: Option A ::= B [C D] E ; A ::= B X E ; X ::= C D | ɛ ; Where ɛ represents the empty string. Repetition A ::= B {C D} E ; Zero or more times: A ::= B X E ; X ::= C D X | ɛ ; One or more times: A ::= B X E ; X ::= C ...


3

Developer of ParseKit here. I see one obvious problem: conjunction is misspelled in a couple of places in your grammar. ParseKit's Grammar Parser's error messages are not the greatest. Ideally, you would receive a nice error message leading you to the problem (but, hey it's open source so anyone is welcome to contribute a fix of this nature). However, ...


3

Try this: CHARACTERS letter = 'A'..'Z' + 'a'..'z' . digit = "0123456789" . messageChar = '\u0020'..'\u007e' - ' ' - '(' - ')' . TOKENS double = ['-'] digit { digit } [ '.' digit { digit } ] . ident = letter { letter | digit | '_' } . message = messageChar { messageChar } CONTEXT (")") . Oh, I have to point out that '\u0020' is ...


2

The grammar is ambiguous, and the parser cannot decide which case to take. You should probably use a grammar like the following: S -> EXPR EXPR -> (EXPR) EXPR -> - EXPR EXPR -> EXPR + EXPR EXPR -> EXPR - EXPR // etc...


2

You may want to look into a PEG generator which has context sensitive tokenization. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parsing_expression_grammar I cannot think of a way you will get around this using COCO/R or similar, as each token needs to be unambiguous. If messages were surrounded by quotes, or some other way of disambiguating then you would not have a ...


2

It's clearly not regular. How is an FA going to recognize (abc)^n c (cba)^n. Strings like this are in your language, right? The argument is a simple one based on the fact that there are infinitely many equivalence classes under the indistinguishability relation I_l.


2

They're just final int's in the Token class , so you could simply introduce an extra int in your lexer like this: grammar T; @lexer::members { public static final int ALTERNATIVE = HIDDEN + 1; } // parser rules ... FOO : 'foo' {$type=ALTERNATIVE;} ; // other lexer rules ... A related Q&A: How do I get an Antlr Parser rule to read from both ...


2

AFAIK you can't setup infix operators and define precedence etc in grammars. These are only currently applicable to extending Perl 6. Here a possible approach. It parses multiplicative terms before additions and also allows words or symbols, e.g. times or *. use v6; grammar TestGrammar { rule TOP { <expr=.add> } rule add { ...


2

If you can draw two parse trees (or equivalently, write two leftmost derivations) for the same sentence, the grammar is ambiguous. No general algorithm exists to do this (ambiguity is an undecidable problem), but for many grammars it's not hard. The example @rici gave is sufficient. If true then s1; s2 One parse tree is <Program> / ...


2

This situation typically arises with what are often called "semi-reserved" words, or what are called "contextual keywords" in C#. In bison/flex, these are a pain to deal with. (Lemon has an undocumented feature where you can define a fallback for a token using the %fallback directive, which is perfect for this use case; you simply make IDENTIFIER the ...


2

The item P -> · is not different from any other item with the · at the right-hand end; the fact that nothing precedes the · does not make it special. The closure of the item B -> id · P will be the state q: B -> id · P P -> · ( E ) P -> · from which goto(q, P) will indicate a transition to B -> id P · and goto(q, () will indicate a ...


1

I used the following test setup: grammar Begin; test: (BEGIN | ID)+; BEGIN : 'begin' ; ID : [a-z]+ ; WS : [ \t\r\n]+ -> skip ; with ANTLRWorks 2.1. It works as expected: with 'begin': Arguments: [Begin, test, -tokens, -tree, -gui, C:\ANTLR\Begin.txt] [@0,0:4='begin',<1>,1:0] [@1,5:4='<EOF>',<-1>,1:5] (test begin) with ...


1

A rewrite rule is a method of replacing subterms of a formula with other terms. In their most basic form, they consist of a set of objects, plus relations on how to transform those objects. An example of a rewrite rule could look like: A → B Now as for what this actually does! You are right on your note, take for example a list of things (and 2 rewrite ...


1

This is not direct answer to your question, but did you considered using Xbase instead of the plain Xtext? With Xbase you can simple use predefined rules, that match everything you need: Java types with generics Expressions Annotations and many more. Here are a couple of useful links: Xbase: https://wiki.eclipse.org/Xbase Extending Xbase blog: ...


1

This grammar parses the example code without throwing errors (the layout is the one favored by Terence Parr, the ANTLR man. I find it helps greatly): Model : (members+=ModelMembers)* ; ModelMembers : Class | MethodDeclaration | Field ; Class : 'class' name=ID '{' '}' ; Field : type=Type name=ID ';' ; PrimitiveType : ("String" ...


1

Turns out the answer was: < S > -> < S >< S > | (< S >) | [< S >] | () | [] mine was "not valid in BNF, no base cases", Oh well.


1

if this is all of the grammar then of course you can: A -> e if not please provide more of your homework ;)


1

To answer this properly, it would be helpful to know your entire grammar. However, here is an attempt for a general answer: Here is the algorithm for calculating follow groups: Init all follow groups to {}, except S which is init to {$}. While there are changes, for each A∈V do:   For each Y → αAβ do:     follow(A) = follow(A) ...


1

I think the First already is wrong. As A and B are optional, and C has a non-empty first: First(S) = First(A) + First(B) + First(C) - {ε} First(A) = {a} + First(C) + {ε} First(B) = First(C) + {d, ε} First(C) = {e, f} => First(A) = {a, e, f, ε} First(B) = {d, e, f, ε} => First(S) = {a, d, e, f} First when occurrence is followed by nt, Follow of ...


1

First, your grammar seems to accept sequences of as separated by single bs, so that no 2 b come together. (aaa...abaaaaa...abaaa...a) This should be equivalent to something like: Q -> P | P b P P -> a | a P


1

Despite the title, this all seems to relate to the scanner, not the parser. I haven't used CoCo/R, so I can't comment on it directly, but in a typical (e.g., lex/Flex) scanner, rules are considered in order, so the rule/pattern that's chosen is the first one that matches. Most scanners I've written include a '.' (i.e., match anything) as their last pattern, ...



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