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18

The syntax is now: var dispatchTime: DispatchTime = DispatchTime.now() + Double(Int64(0.1 * Double(NSEC_PER_SEC))) / Double(NSEC_PER_SEC) DispatchQueue.main.after(when: dispatchTime, execute: { // your function here }) Or, more simply: DispatchQueue.main.after(when: .now() + 0.1) { // your function here } If you enter your code and then choose "...


14

Since the beginning, Swift has provided some facilities for making ObjC and C more Swifty, adding more with each version. Now, in Swift 3, the new "import as member" feature lets frameworks with certain styles of C API -- where you have a data type that works sort of like a class, and a bunch of global functions to work with it -- act more like Swift-native ...


6

Since Swift 1.x, Swift has been using dispatch_once behind the scenes to perform thread-safe lazy initialization of global variables and static properties. So the static var above was already using dispatch_once, which makes it sort of weird (and possibly problematic to use it again as a token for another dispatch_once. In fact there's really no safe way ...


3

One option is to set a precondition to test directly for the queue or set "specific" on it and retrieve it later. Further, one could use setSpecific and getSpecific. Alternatively, you can use a precondition check if you're on a queue so that should fulfill the "get current" need. src: https://github.com/duemunk/Async/blob/feature/Swift_3.0/AsyncTest/...


2

Only [self doSomething] will be synchronized call and using dispatch_async will be asynchronized call. Statement A [self doSomething] Statement B Above code will start executing Statement A, finish Statement A, Start executing function doSomething, finish function doSomething and then start executing and finish Statement B. Statement A dispatch_async(...


2

The dispatch_group_notify schedules a block object to be submitted to a queue when the group is empty. Thus in your second example you get the crash. The messages in your log appear out-of-order because of calling print from different threads asynchronously. Here is the real situation: Creating new dispatch group Using existing dispatch group Task fired ...


2

The dispatch queue for completionBlock. If NULL (default), the main queue is used. dispatch_group_t group = dispatch_group_create(); dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_queue_create("com.app", DISPATCH_QUEUE_CONCURRENT); AFHTTPSessionManager *manager = [AFHTTPSessionManager manager]; manager.completionQueue = queue; for(int k = 0; k < 10; k++) { ...


2

This type of thing is usually done with a DISPATCH_SOURCE_TYPE_DATA_OR source in GCD. That coalesces multiple requests (triggered via dispatch_source_merge_data()) into a single invocation of the source event handler. It is restricted to 64 bits of "payload" retrievable with dispatch_source_get_data(), (atomically ORed together from all the values passed to ...


2

You should modify self.data on the main thread. dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(QOS_CLASS_USER_INITIATED, 0)) { let data = self.dataOfJson("http://192.168.1.100/practice/studentCourseSelection.php?ID=\(NSUserDefaults.standardUserDefaults().objectForKey("currentUser")!)") self.RefreshTableView(data) } func RefreshTableView(data: ??) { ...


2

Use .dispatchPrecondition(.onQueue(expectedQueue)), the Swift 3 API replacement for the dispatch_assert_queue() C API. This was covered in this year's WWDC GCD session: https://developer.apple.com/videos/play/wwdc2016/720/


2

I cannot test it, because I'm not using a build with that error, but I'm pretty sure by capturing self explicitly you can fix it: dispatch_sync(connectQueue) { [self] in self.test = 20 } EDIT: Apparently it doesn't work, maybe you can try this (not very nice tbh): var copy = self dispatch_sync(connectQueue) { copy.test = 20 } self = copy If you ...


1

Answering my own question: Based on KFDoom's comments, I'm now using setSpecific and getSpecific. This creates a key, sets it on the test queue, and later on, gets it again: let testQueueLabel = "com.example.my-test-queue" let testQueue = DispatchQueue(label: testQueueLabel, attributes: []) let testQueueKey = DispatchSpecificKey<Void>() testQueue....


1

DispatchQueue.main.after(when: .now() + .seconds(0.1)) { // Your code print("Running") }


1

The main thread's run loop has a step in which it runs any blocks queued on the main queue. You might find this answer useful if you want to understand what the run loop does in detail. GCD creates the threads for concurrent queues. A thread doesn't have a run loop until the first time something running on the thread asks for the thread's run loop, at which ...


1

The relationship between the main thread's run loop and the main dispatch queue is merely that they're both run on the main thread and that blocks dispatched to main queue are interleaved on the main thread with events processed on the main runloop. As the Concurrency Programming Guide says: The main dispatch queue is a globally available serial queue ...


1

You could create the queue in your test function. -(void) myTask2:(dispatch_queue_t*)queue { dispatch_async(*queue, ^{ [self.service fetchData]; }); } -(void)testMyTask2{ dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_queue_create("my.sequential.queue", NULL); [myObj myTask2:&queue]; dispatch_sync(queue, ^{ }); } (Just realised ...


1

For execute test in async block use XCTestExpectation class -(void) myTask2 { XCTestExpectation *expectation = [self expectationWithDescription:@"catch is called"]; dispatch_async(dispatch_queue_create("my.sequetial.queue", NULL), ^{ [self.serviceClient fetchDataForUserId:self.userId]; [expectation fulfill]; }); [self ...


1

Tests based on KFDoom's answer: import XCTest import Dispatch class TestQueue: XCTestCase { func testWithSpecificKey() { let queue = DispatchQueue(label: "label") let key = DispatchSpecificKey<Void>() queue.setSpecific(key:key, value:()) let expectation1 = expectation(withDescription: "main") let ...


1

call DispatchQueue.main.after(when: DispatchTime, execute: () -> Void) I'd highly recommend using the Xcode tools to convert to Swift 3 (Edit > Convert > To Current Swift Syntax). It caught this for me


1

you can try with willDismissWithButtonIndex instead of didDismissWithButtonIndex - (void)alertView:(UIAlertView *)alertView willDismissWithButtonIndex:(NSInteger)buttonIndex { if (buttonIndex != alertView.cancelButtonIndex) { [self.navigationController popViewControllerAnimated:YES]; } } for me this work ok!, I hope this helps you


1

Swift 3 version: DispatchQueue.main.async { print("Hello") }


1

The dispatch_async syntax has changed with Swift 3: DispatchQueue.main.async { hostView.addSubview(self.commandField) }


1

I answered the question about cancel dispatch_after here. But when i google to find a solution it also return me to this thread, so... iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite introduced dispatch_block_cancel that allow you to cancel a block before they start executing. You can view detail about that answer here Using dispatch_after get benefit about using variables that ...



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