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4

No, logic programming as embodied by those things and neo4j are quite different. On one level, you're right that they conceptually both amount to graph storage and graph query. But for logic programming, it's only conceptually graph query, there's no guarantee that it's actually stored that way (where with neo4j, it is). Second, with logic programming ...


4

I can't speak for arangodb, but for neo4j this bit has to be addressed by the application. The bits of schema that you can assert about graphs don't address what kinds of relationships can exist off of a node type. Contingent relationships like what you're talking about are a step further than that even. Doing validation like this can be more complex than ...


4

The answer of FrobberOfBits is very good and holds true for the ArangoDB database as well. However ArangoDB offers a micro-service framework called "Foxx" that allows you to define additional API endpoints for your database that can execute custom code. One application for Foxx would exactly be your problem: * Define an endpoint to remove the relation that ...


3

It looks like the notion of country should be a first class citizen in your graph since your query depends on it. Graph model design typically gets influenced a lot by your query patterns. So I suggest to have a node labeled Country for each country and connect the Address node with :LOCATED_IN relationships to the country. (consequently drop the country ...


3

I believe the key problem is data locality and horizontal scalability. A premise of NoSQL is that the read-heavy models of RBDMSs, i.e. those that require joins, lead to bottlenecks. Think of Twitter: the original data model was read-heavy, but the joins you need to make are insanely large (billions of tweets x hundreds of millions of users x tens of ...


2

It all depends on your use-cases, in many cases a simple relationship is good enough but if you want to do more with that entity or fact you turn it into a node, oftentimes it turns out that it is an actually quite important concept in the domain. In our data modeling class there is a specific section on this and also in the "Graph Databases" book it is ...


2

One option is to have another node from address for country, as pointed out by stefan Armbruster. If you do not want to change the data structure, just add an index to the field "country" of Address. Then you can have a query MATCH (:Group{name:'family'})<-[:placed_in_group]-(contact)-[:lives-at]->(:Address{country:'US'})


2

Range probably isn't what you want. Range produces a collection of numbers. It's good for looping, like if you want to go through all the numbers from 1-10, but it's not that useful with other array indexes. You probably want a combination of the + operator on collections, index operations, with possibly a dash of extract and filter. Combining those will ...


1

Try: select * FROM Users LET $c = in.size() ORDER BY $c


1

Method iii) should be the fastest solution since you MERGE against a single property. Do you create the uniqueness constraint before you do the MERGE? Without an index (constraint or normal index), the process will take a long time with a growing number of nodes. CREATE CONSTRAINT ON (book:Book) ASSERT book.isbn IS UNIQUE Followed by: USING PERIODIC ...


1

Use the py2neo module, connect to a REST endpoint for a neo4j server, issue whatever traversal you want in cypher, and process the results. Here are some documentation pointers on how to do that. You need to write a cypher query which does the traversal you want, and feeds you the results in the right order though. A trivial query MATCH n RETURN n will ...


1

You need to have neo4j-shell-<version>.jar on your classpath and set a remote_shell_enabled='true' as config option while initializing your embedded instance. I've written up a blog post on this some time ago: http://blog.armbruster-it.de/2014/01/using-remote-shell-combined-with-neo4j-embedded/


1

The difference between document and graph is just a matter of modelling relation ships. Here you can see a detailed presentation. In short: if you use the document model you have direct relations between documents (vertexes), This means you can not store properties on the edge. If you use the graph model your relationships between documents (vertex) are ...


1

I'm pretty sure this is not possible. If you click on the "Style" tab of the pop-up and click on "View stylesheet" you'll see in the GRASS file that the colors are tied to node labels. If you want a different sort of visualization, you could submit a pull request: https://github.com/neo4j/neo4j/tree/master/community/browser It's important to note that ...


1

The answer is to replace each count( with count(DISTINCT To remove null values!


1

try to introduce a WITH to limit the calculation of :NEXT paths to only those pairs of a, d that are known to be a shortestpath. It's also a good practice to supply an upper limit for variable path length matches - im using 100 here as an example: MATCH route = allShortestPaths( (a:Stop {name:'A'})-[:STOPS_AT*100]-(d:Stop {name:'D'}) ) WITH route, a, d ...


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Navigate to this page on your browser: http://localhost:7474/webadmin/#/info/org.neo4j/Primitive%20count/ (Change the host and port, if needed, to point to the actual neo4j server location.)


1

I'm not sure that you can do this with one cypher query. You might need to first return the keys and then generate a query which gets those keys. To get the keys, you could return all the data, or in Neo4j 2.2.0 (still a release candidate, but hopefully out soon), you can do this: MATCH n UNWIND keys(n) AS key RETURN DISTINCT key That will return you a ...



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