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5

This is an NP-hard optimization problem. For example, the Partition problem can be reduced into this easily (the planarity property does not cause a problem). So an algorithm that calculates an optimal solution (and you seem to ask for an optimal solution in your comment) is unlikely to be practical for "tens of thousands of nodes". If you don't actually ...


4

You are right. That is a very expensive method to achieve what you want. I can only speculate if there is a mathematically sound way to optimize and ensure that it is close to being a uniform distribution. I'm not even sure that your method leads to a uniform distribution although it seems like it would. Let me try: Based on the docs for ...


3

Having done a bit of reading, it looks as though the best solution might be the generalized version of Gleeson's algorithm presented in this paper. However, I still don't really understand how to implement it, so for the time being I've been working on Bansal et al's algorithm. Like my naive approach, this is a Markov chain-based method that uses random ...


2

The details of the instance change everything. Call a vertex heavy if it's over threshold by itself. It never makes sense to have a subgraph with two heavy vertices, because we could split it in two. Thus, the number of subgraphs in the optimal solution is related additively to the number of subgraphs containing no heavy vertex. As a result, we can delete ...


2

The redundant permutations are filtered out because the start node of each returned permutation is always less than all the remaining elements (under some ordering). I suspect the problem is in a missing implementation of these steps: AK:= adjacency structure of strong component K with least vertex in subgraph of G induced by {s, s+ 1, n}; and s ...


1

Looks like the wikipedia code is in first order logic; pseudocode would look something like the following, disclaimer: I'm not familiar with this algorithm and am only going off of the FOL "code" Set<Node> pred(Node n); Set<Node> succ(Node n); Set<Node> succ(Set<Node> interval) { Set<Node> retVal = new Set() // union of ...


1

In a well structured program (i.e. no gotos), the beginning of a loop must dominate the contents of the loop. Every node which has incoming backedges must be the head of a loop. However, you have some freedom to the actual loop contents thanks to the ability to specify explicit continues. The minimal set of nodes that must be in the loop are all blocks ...


1

One way would be to write your own algorithm using some sort of electrostatic repulsion as in the paper you linked. Can probably be done in less than 40 lines of Matlab (it seems others have tried). But sometimes, it is better to use external tools than to do everything in Matlab. The best tool for drawing graphs is probably Graphviz, which comes with a ...


1

There will be O(n^2) edges when you create one between all vertices (a complete graph). You can't have lesser complexity than that.


1

The problem is NP-hard then I will highlight an exponential solution. This solution Have many improve points, I will highlight somes. The whole idea is: each partition of vertex are connected by some edges then you can ensure that if you try with all the possible sets of edges that makes a correct partition of the graph. You can find the best case counting ...


1

The standard algorithm for finding Minimum Bottleneck Spanning Tree (MBST) is known as Camerini’s algorithm. It runs in linear time and is as follows: 1. Find a median edge weight in graph and partition all edges in to two partitions A and B around it. Let A have all edges greater than pivot and B has all edges less than or equal to pivot. ...


1

hopfield neural network can be used to determine optimal path but you can tweak it to use for routing. There is a simple implementation here.



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