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8

1 is incorrect, because if we happen to relax the arcs in the topological order of a shortest path tree, then we converge in one iteration, despite the fact that the shortest path tree may be arbitrarily deep. s --> t --> u --> v Relax s->t, t->u, u->v; shortest path from s->v is three hops, but B--F has made two iterations. If we do ...


4

You have few obstacles on a large field. If you treat every square of the field as vertex in your graph, you will end up with a large graph, which requires a lot of memory and will take a long time to traverse. The idea is to reduce the number of squares in the graph by creating rectangular blocks from the squares. To illustrate, you want to convert your ...


4

Assuming D(u,v) = infinity if there is no path from u to v (I really see no reason to assume otherwise, it is weird to assume D(u,v)=0 in this case), the claim is true. Proof: First, assume there is a path for each pair u,v - otherwise sum of all pairs is infinity, and we are done. For each pair of vertices u,v: If D(u,v)>0 and D(v,u)>0 this pair ...


3

The description in the Wikipedia article truly deserves improvement. The first confusing part of the article is, that the description of the randomized Prim's algorithm does not elaborate on the assumed data structure used by the algorithm. Thus, phrases like "opposite cell" become confusing. Basically there are 2 main approaches "maze generator ...


3

In each iteration, exactly one node is extracted from the priority queue, and it will never be added again. Therefore, the priority queue will eventually become empty, and the algorithm stops when that happens. If there is no path to the target node, the unreachable node(s) will have their predecessor pointers set to nil (which was their initial value). The ...


3

Let assume that we have a data structure that supports the following operations efficiently: Add a segment. Delete a segment. Return the maximum number of segments that cover one point(that is, the "best" point). If have such a structure, we can get use the initial problem efficiently in the following manner: Let's create an array of events(one event ...


3

Since repetitions are allowed this can be solved in polynomial time by a slight variation of the Bellman-Ford algorithm. Let OPT(v,i) denote the optimal cost to reach v using i edges and let w(x,y) denote the weight between vertices x and y. Then we have the following recurrence: OPT(v, i+1) = min { OPT(u, i) + w(u,v) }, over all edges (u,v). This can be ...


3

Let's call the original graph T with N vertices and M edges. First compute the condensation of T and let's call it G. Every vertex v of G represents several vertices of T; additionally, you can reach from any of this vertices to another in T. Also, G is a DAG. So, if there's only one vertex in G with in-degree equal to 0 (let's call it v0), that means that ...


2

Since you mention Floyd-Warshall, I think having an adjacency matrix is not a problem. Let us look at it this way: a cycle of length 4 has the form a->b->c->d->a. Split that into two pairs of two edges: a->b->c and c->d->a. Given the adjacency matrix, we can easily compute the matrix of shortest paths using exactly two edges: the ...


2

One way to do it is to take every vertice, and depth search the graph with that vertice as the root. For every depth search you check if you have visited every other vertices. If it has, the player which corresponds to that vertice dominates all the players in the graph. If you are familiar with C++ , I can write the program here. The time complexity is ~ ...


2

with having negative edges, but didn't have any negative cycle, then Sigma on D(u,v) (sum on all vertex pairs) cannot be negative. D(u, v) = 0 for no arc u -> v Consider the directed graph: 1 -> 2 -> 3 With each arc having cost -1: there is no negative cost cycle, but the sum over all pairs is negative. So the claim is false because we ...


2

You can use Dynamic programming to solve this problem. Let f(i, j) be the smallest lexicographical path (after sorting the path) from (i, j) to (N, M) moving only right and down. Consider the following recurrence: f(i, j) = sort( a(i, j) + smallest(f(i + 1, j), f(i, j + 1))) where a(i, j) is the value in the grid at (i, j), smallest (x, y) returns the ...


2

The key property of DFS here is that, given two nodes u and v, the interval [u.discovered, u.processed] is a subinterval of [v.discovered, v.processed] if and only if u is a descendant of v. The times in BFS do not have this property; you have to do something else, e.g., compute the intervals via DFS on the tree that BFS produced. Then the classification ...


2

Try weighting the walls with uniquely random weights at the very beginning of the procedure. That list of weights will never change. When you choose your next wall from the list of available walls, choose the wall with minimal weight.


2

Your solution doesn't look very wrong. In particular, it is a maze, and (if you cannot walk diagonally) there is a unique path from each (open) location to each other (open) location. The only problem with it seems to be the style. If you consider the "correct" maze you posted, without the outer border, and take the topleft cell to be (0,0), you can observe ...


2

I really suspect that there isn't a known better algorithm for general graphs. All the papers I found on the subject [1] [2] describe algorithms that run in O(|V| * |E|) time. That isn't better than your naïve attempt in the worst case. Even the wikipedia page [3] says the fastest algorithms reduce the problem to matrix multiplication, which the fastest ...


2

I get the impression from papers like http://research.microsoft.com/pubs/144985/todsfinal.pdf that there is no algorithm that does better than O(VE) or O(V^3) in the general case. For sparse graphs and other special graphs there are faster algorithms. It seems, however, that you can still make improvements by separating "index construction" from "query", if ...


1

DFS Algorithm Input the vertices and edges of the graph G = (V, E). Input the source vertex and assign it to the variable S. Push the source vertex to the stack. Repeat the steps 5 and 6 until the stack is empty. Pop the top element of the stack and display it. Push the vertices which is neighbor to just popped element, if it is not in the queue and ...


1

I will assume that you have a State class with the following attributes (if you like graphs, use Node instead of State): Set<Town> unused; // towns not yet visited ArrayList<Town> path; // current path double dist; // total distance in path Then use code like this one to recursively try out every single possible path ...


1

You are basically combining the Knapsack Problem with the Travelling Salesman Problem. Your main problem here seems to be actually the Knapsack Problem, rather then the Travelling Salesman Problem, since it has the one hard restriction (maximum delivery volume). Maybe try to combine the solutions for the Knapsack Problem with the Travelling Salesman. If ...


1

Safe Moves Here are some ideas for safely mutating an existing feasible solution: Any two consecutive stops can always be swapped if they are both pickups, or both deliveries. This is obviously true for the "both deliveries" case; for the "both pickups" case: if you had room to pick up A, then pick up B without delivering anything in between, then you ...


1

How do you implement a proper edge classification for a BFS on a directed graph? As you already established, seeing a node for the first time creates a tree edge. The problem with BFS instead of DFS, as David Eisenstat said before me, is that back edges cannot be distinguished from cross ones just based on traversal order. Instead, you need to do a ...


1

Instead of timeof(), you need an other vertex property, which contains the distance from the root. Let name that distance. You have to processing a v vertex in the following way: for (v0 in v.neighbours) { if (!v0.discovered) { v0.discovered = true; v0.parent = v; v0.distance = v.distance + 1; } } v.processed = true; ...


1

The problem can be solved in O(Nlog(N)) time per test case. Observe that there is an optimal placement of two vertical lines each of which go through some segment endpoints Compress segments' coordinates. More info at What is coordinate compression? Build a sorted set of segment endpoints X Sort segments [a_i,b_i] by a_i Let Q be a priority queue which ...


1

The simple answer to your question is that when adding an edge you need to check if the edge implies removing a wall that is the last neighbour of any of its neighbouring wall pieces. This will prevent any walls from being connected only by the corner.


1

A simple Java implementation of Prim's algorithm: import java.util.LinkedList; import java.util.Random; public class Maze { public static final char PASSAGE_CHAR = ' '; public static final char WALL_CHAR = '▓'; public static final boolean WALL = false; public static final boolean PASSAGE = !WALL; private final boolean map[][]; ...


1

You need to initalize your graph as directed before you start adding edges to it: gd = Graph(directed=True) gd.add_vertices(5) gd.add_edges([(0,1),(1,2)]) print(gd.get_adjacency()) # [[0, 1, 0, 0, 0] # [0, 0, 1, 0, 0] # [0, 0, 0, 0, 0] # [0, 0, 0, 0, 0] # [0, 0, 0, 0, 0]] The .to_directed() method that Matthew mentioned won't do what you want, because ...


1

The algorithm you described is not acceptable because there can be at most 100 rows, so if in each row the number of nodes in the tree doubles, you'll end up with 2^101 nodes in your tree in the worst case. That problem can be solved by a simple dynamic programming, where on each step you have to choose the minimum between the first and the second gap: ...


1

Long story short, it won't loop endlessly since Dijkstra is BFS (traverse level by level) + Greedy (relax the distance from previous level to current level), and it does not traverse back to the previous level. The algorithm will end when the queue is empty. If the destination is not found, the algorithm should return -1 or null.


1

I do not want to give the complete answer, but here is how you approach it: Can you add edge[s] to the tree such that it is not a tree anymore and still the tree contains all the shortest paths? What happens if there is an edge that is shorter than the heaviest edge? it is confusing because the problem says "the shortest path between any two vertexes is on ...



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