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1

The cycle is called Eulerian, iff it contains all edges, exactly one time each. That means that Eulerian cycles can only differ by edge's order (I propose to exclude edge's cyclical permutations as trivial option). It is possible to find Eulerian cycle, using Fleury's algorithm: in short, move as you like (throwing out the edges you went on), but do not ...


0

Yes, they often do. Have a look at this example, which contains multiple disjunct edge circles - you can build many different Eulerian circles from them: Taken from German Wikipedia, created by Chin tin tin


0

Just keep searching in East, SouthEast, South and SouthWest direction at one go recursively for each node having value as 1. If the call to visit function is a fresh call and not from recursion increase the connected components. import java.util.Scanner; public class Solution { public static void visit(int[][] ar, boolean[][] v,int i, int j){ ...


2

Have a look into the GraphHopper project (where I'm the author of) or other routing projects for OSM already doing this. The idea is to count the number of ways one node is member of and mark nodes as junctions if they have a count of two or more (or just one if an endstanding 'junction'). Still the nodes in-between should be accessible as you need to plot ...


0

You are on the right track. Modifying the Bellman Ford algorithm is correct and it also has exactly O(|E||V|) time complexity. As a good guideline I would say think about the problem: "Shortest path from each node", instead of "Shortest path to each node". Is that problem easier to solve ? How do they translate one to another ? If you need additional ...


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It looks like the python bindings to GraphX are delayed at least to Spark 1.4. It is waiting behind the Java API.


0

ok sorry for my bad programming style, but this is only a draft. Anyhow it seems to work, please test on other undirected graphs and improve if necessary: import networkx as nx import matplotlib.pyplot as plt G = nx.Graph() G.add_path(['te','og','oe','sa','oa','ta','tb']) G.add_path(['tf','oe']) G.add_path(['sa','of','td','od']) ...


0

In the example given by top rated answer: (2,-10) goes into priority queue. Agreed. So does (3,x) where x<=-11 as heuristic is admissible. Now (3,x) gets popped as x<-10 and we get to the correct solution. I can't put this as a comment as I don't have enough reputation.


0

Hints Consider the graph consisting of all pairs of positions for 2 rabbits (including positions where the 2 rabbits are at the same location). Add directed edges to this graph representing the changes in position if you use each type of instruction. There will be a meeting path if and only if it is possible to construct a path from every vertex to one of ...


5

You are solving the Longest Path Problem, which is usually NP-Complete. However, in your case, you actually have a Directed Acyclic Graph, and thus an efficient solution is available with the following recurrence formula: D(i,-1) = D(i,m) = -INFINITY //out of bounds D(-1,j) = 0 [ j>=0 ] //succesful path D(i,j) = max{ D(i-1, j-1) , ...


0

Please refer to this implementation by ivan-brugere https://github.com/ivan-brugere/matlab-networks-toolbox


1

Lets optimal solution for given graph be a cycle with avg edge weight X. There is some optimal cycle with edges e_1, e_2 ... e_n, such that avg(e_i) = X. For my proof, I assume all indexes modulo n, so e_(n + 1) is e_1. Lets say that our heuristic can't find this solution, that means: for each i (whatever edge we took first) exists such j (we followed all ...


0

If there is cycle on the path from the first node to the last one, the number of paths is infinitely large. Otherwise, there are no cycles, so a part of the graph we are interested in is acyclic(there a can be a cycle somewhere in the graph, but if does not lie on the path between the first and last node, it does not matter). That's why can use dynamic ...


0

This is not a solution yet but some observations. Firstly with n edges and n vertices, and each vertex is connected to some other vertex except itself, any strongly connected component of size k in this graph must have exactly k edges. This follows from any SCC of size k must have at least k-1 edges. In this graph it's not possible for any SCC to have ...


1

An implementation I did based on second alternative on wikipedia page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topological_sorting public class Graph { Hashtable<Node, ArrayList<Node>> adjList = new Hashtable<Node, ArrayList<Node>>(); ArrayList<Node> nodes = new ArrayList<Node>(); LinkedList<Node> topoSorted; ...


1

You necessarily have edges comming from cycles, so you'll first want to decompose your problem into strongly connected components. Note that the graph of your strongly connected components is acyclic, meaning two nodes from different components are easy to compare. Then, you can probably try to search for cycles and "mark bad" one edge in each cycle, which ...


1

Especially since you only want a good solution and not necessarily the best, it sounds like a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method should work for you. Start with a random enumeration E_0 of the nodes and calculate your score S(E_0) For many steps Every time step j, obtain a new enumeration candidate E* from the current E_j by changing the numbers of two ...


0

I'm going to start with some assumptions regarding the problem: Meaning of connected component: consider the transformation of the graph where each edge becomes undirected. Two vertices are considered connected if there is a path between them in the transformed (undirected) graph. If there is a (directed) edge (i,j) linking two vertices i, j, there can ...


1

This would be my code. Here visited[] is a boolean array or hashtable PROCEDURE SPANNING-TREE(G, v) S := {v} visited[v] := true while S is not empty u := pop(S) for each u' connected to u if u' is not visited visited[u'] := true s.push(u') add-edge(u, u')


3

You can just mark a vertex as visited when you push it to the stack, not when you pop it.


1

The reason you don't find a lot of publications on this is that it's an too easy problem. If you have a symmetric relation, any two neighbors “a” and “c” of a node “b” form such a „1-transitive” connection: b is the link. The pseudocode for map-reduce is def map(b, neighbors): for a in neighbors: for c in neighbors: if not a == c: ...


0

Use a depth first search and keep track of the recursion depth: once you get to depth 2, print all the nodes in your stack. Repeat for each node, eliminating duplicates as needed. I'm not aware of a specific term, you seem to want to find all paths of length 2 between any 2 nodes.


0

I believe you are looking for the connected components of the input graph. Basically, these can be found by using depth-first search. You start at some point in the graph. On termination, all visited nodes form one connected component. Then, you iterate by selecting the next unvisited node, discovering connected components until all nodes are visited.


0

routes is your graph, in adjacency-list format. Each key is a node, the value being a list of (other_node, edge_weight) tuples. So what you're looking for is how "graph.childrenOf" should work. Assuming start, end are simple string node names (like 'a') you can just look them up in the dictionary; e.g. graph[a] will give you [('b', 5.0), ('c', 8.0)]. You ...


0

You can build your graph using a dict of dicts: routes = {'a': {'b': 5.0, 'c': 8.0}, 'c': {'a': 8.0, 'd': 2.0}} Then routes['a']['b'] will return the weight, which is 5.0 in this case. If you need to get all the children of a node you can do routes['a'].keys() and that will return ['c', 'b'].


1

Dijkstra algorithm always finds the shortest path (in graphs without negative edges) and never backtracks. It is easy to reason about it. Always choosing the minimum Think about a node and its edges (it's just part of a larger graph): 6 _ 3 | / 14| /9 |/ 1-------2 7 Dijkstra's algorithm will begin choosing the edge 1-2 ...


3

It would not skip node 3. It would do this: Start from node 1, update distances to neighbours: d[2] = 7 d[3] = 9 d[6] = 14 Pick the next unvisited node with distance from source minimum, in this case node 2 and update the distances to its neighbors: d[3] = min(d[3], d[2] + c(2, 3)) = min(9, 7 + 10) = 9 d[4] = min(d[4], d[2] + c(2,4)) = ...


1

This is not something you want to do with a simplistic Depth-First Search (DFS). DFS, going depth-first, will be blocked if it hits a cycle. Cycles are infinitely-deep. If you want to output (probably using a generator) the inifnite paths to each node when including cycles, you should use a Breadth-First Search (BFS). Being Breadth-first, means that a ...


1

As mentioned in the comment, your algorithm has no reason to terminate if you allow arbitrary cycles. What you could do is allow for a maximum path length and dismiss all paths that are too long: def find_all_paths(graph, start, end, path=[], max_length=10): if len(path) >= max_length: return [] path = path + [start] if start == end: ...


2

As mentioned in another answer, Dijkstra's algorithm is the solution. What wasn't mentioned is how to implement that solution in networkx. Here it is. Simple as this: import networkx as nx my_graph = nx.Graph() my_graph.add_edges_from([('A','B'),('B','C'),('A','C'),('C','D'),('A','D'),('C','E'),('D','E'),('D','F'),('F','G')]) #graph is now defined. ...


2

If you must go from A to G in an efficient way, you aren't looking for a minimum spanning tree algorithm. A simple shortest path algorithm is enough. You just have to adapt you graph to put the weights in the edges instead of the nodes. But it's just a matter of setting the node's weight to the incoming edge. Also, both shortest path and minimum spanning ...


0

I thought this problem would be easier for planar graph, but unfortunately it's not the case. Best match for this problem I was able to find is minimum sum coloring and largest bipartite subgraph. For largest bipartite subgraph, assume that number of reds + number of greens exactly match the size of largest bipartite subgraph. Then this problem is ...


4

First, let's note that the problem is a variant of graph coloring. Now, if you only dealing with 2 colors (red,green) - coloring a graph with 2 colors is fairly easy, and is basically done by finding out if the graph is bipartite, and coloring each "side" of the graph in one color. Finding if a graph is bipartite is fairly simple. However, if you want more ...


1

Instead of pushing all of the neighbors/children, you should just push the nodes that need to be revisited, and then determine which is the next neighbor/child to go to when that node gets popped off. By keeping both nodes-to-be-visited and nodes-to-be-revisited on the same stack, it is no wonder that, at some point, they get confused.


2

I think your approaches are actually equivalent, provided that for approach #1, you record only the shortest distance to each node for each number of red edges used -- you don't need to record the entire path (just as you don't need to record it for ordinary Dijkstra on an ordinary shortest path problem) Also this approach is sound. In particular, your ...



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