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18

Algorithm for a Solution You're looking for a topological sort algorithm: from collections import defaultdict def topological_sort(dependency_pairs): 'Sort values subject to dependency constraints' num_heads = defaultdict(int) # num arrows pointing in tails = defaultdict(list) # list of arrows going out for h, t in dependency_pairs: ...


18

Hands down Neo4j. Giraph's graph computations run as Hadoop jobs, because they are meant to work for large distributed graphs. The overhead of managing these jobs is too large to be efficient on a small scale graph running on a pseudo-distributed single machine cluster. Not only that, but Neo4j's specialty is traversals. A big reason for that is because ...


11

Neo4j Traversers are built by the Traversal class under the hood, whose configuration is made available as TraversalDescription via the GraphDatabaseService (in Neo4j 2.0). I believe that there are still legacy, deprecated implementations in the code of Neo4J. Traversal comes in 2 types: 1. Unidirectional traversal Instantiate by calling: ...


8

You can use a type like type Graph a = [Node a] data Node a = Node a [Node a] The list of nodes is the outgoing (or incoming if you prefer) edges of that node. Since you can build cyclic data structures this can represent arbitrary (multi-)graphs. The drawback of this kind of graph structure is that it cannot be modified once you have built it it. To ...


8

You will have to have specific path field for each vertex. That way you can keep track of the paths you've chosen, hence the short path found. I will use an String array, just like you used the Boolean array for storing visited vertices. public String findPath(int v, int w) { Queue<Integer> q = new LinkedList<Integer>(); boolean[] ...


7

To remember IDs of the users you've already visited, you need a map of a length of 250,000 integers. That's far from "too much". Just maintain such a map and only traverse through the edges that lead to the already undiscovered users, adding them to that map at the point of finding such edge. As far I can see, you're close to implement Breadth-first ...


6

See Graph. #!/usr/bin/perl use autodie; use strict; use warnings; use Graph; use Graph::TransitiveClosure::Matrix; my $dat = 'kevin-bacon.dat'; my $kbg = Graph->new(undirected => 1); open my $kbf, '<', $dat; my %movies; while ( my $line = <$kbf> ) { last unless $line =~ /\S/; chomp $line; my ($u, $m, $v) = split /;/, $line; ...


6

Disclaimer: below is a mostly pointless exercise in "tying the knot" technique. Fgl is the way to go if you want to actually use your graphs. However if you are wondering how it's possible to represent cyclic data structures functionally, read on. It is pretty easy to represent a graph in Haskell! -- a directed graph data Vertex a b = Vertex { vdata :: a, ...


6

Depth-first tree search can get stuck in an infinite loop, which is why it is not "complete". Graph search keeps track of the nodes it has already searched, so it can avoid following infinite loops. "Redundant paths" are different paths which lead from the same start node to the same end node. Graph search will still explore all these redundant paths, but ...


6

I'll try to describe these parts to the best of my ability. As to the difference between PathExpander and BranchOrderingPolicy: a PathExpander is invoked for each traversal branch the first time the traversal continues from that branch. (A traversal branch is a node including the path leading up to that node, note that there may be many paths, i.e. many ...


5

This isn't an answer, but it's hints towards your answer. You are best served by first looking up what a Breadth First Search is in a graph. Also, if you have not been given a regular expression, you may consider the tokenizing problem and look that up. Possibly that won't be needed. Check the assignment and see if you can just slurp in some information. ...


5

Converting Gremlin Groovy to Gremlin Java shouldn't be very difficult. I would always argue against doing it as you will: Greatly increase the size of your code Make your code less readable Make your code harder to maintain If you work in a "Java shop" that won't hear of an outside programming language, I think that it's not too hard to sell folks on ...


4

A path that visits every node once and only once is called a Hamiltonian Path. The problem of finding a Hamiltonian Path is called Hamiltonian Path Problem. First of all, this problem is NP-Complete. An algorithm whose run time is proportional to at most a polynomial of input size is called a polynomial algorithm. For example, most sorting algorithms ...


4

This is one variant I guess: graph.foldLeft((List[Int](), 1)){ (s, e) => if (e._2.size == 0) (0 :: s._1, s._2) else (s._2 :: s._1, (s._2 + 1)) }._1.reverse Updated: This is an expanded version. Here I fold left over the elements of the map starting out with a tuple of an empty list and number 1. For each element I check the size of the graph and ...


4

You're not going to do this with regex. You're going to need to create a graph data structure modeling the keyboard, with each key being a node and the edges being assigned a direction (so node G would have an edge with direction Right and destination H). You could also have an edge going from a key to it's shifted version (or from shifted to unshifted). ...


4

I fixed this by simply implementing the Evaluator interface, and overwriting the Evaluator.evaluate(Path p) method; public final class MyEvaluator implements Evaluator { private int peopleCount; private int maxPeople; public MyEvaluator(int max) { maxPeople = max; peopleCount = 0; } public Evaluation evaluate(Path p) { ...


4

Maybe this Wikipedia article about the six degrees of separation will answer your question: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_degrees_of_separation


4

You don't provide any significant code that shows how you are using loop, but I think with the right arguments you can get it to do what you want: gremlin> g = TinkerGraphFactory.createTinkerGraph() ==>tinkergraph[vertices:6 edges:6] gremlin> g.v(1).as('x').out.gather.scatter.loop('x'){true}{true} ==>v[2] ==>v[4] ==>v[3] ==>v[5] ...


4

Idea: Use breadth-first search, but also have a count on each node (or, similarly, a list of the inputs). When you visit a node: Increase its count If the count is less than the number of incoming edges it has, don't do anything Otherwise, process the node as usual Your example: Candidates: A We process A. Candidates: C, B, D We visit C, but don't ...


3

I don't see how this is related to regex - do you think you can do this with regular expressions? I can't see how. I think it's a graphing problem, no? Build a graph with all the edges between keys and their neighbors, and then traverse the input and see if it represents a valid traversal of the graph. Your "more complicated runs" are essentially just ...


3

I would suggest a topological sort. And after a quick check, it is easy to do with JGraphT. Also notice: For this iterator to work correctly the graph must be acyclic, and must not be modified during iteration. Currently there are no means to ensure that, nor to fail-fast; the results with cyclic input (including self-loops) or concurrent modifications ...


3

Are you looking for some kind of variation on a Topological Sort? Since you know the starting nodes, you can start the algorithm from them. When you meet an "operation" node, you create the computation with the nodes leading you to it. Naturally, the graph should be consistent in some ways specific to your problem. To implement this in Python, what you ...


3

Another compact (space-wise) solution that us assistants have suggested and doesn't use O(n^2) storage space is to have each node store only which node it came from. This can be done by changing the visited-list to an integer array (int[] visited). step 1: initialize visited list, so that every element is '-1', or "unvisited" step 2: mark the first node as ...


3

Tail Recursive solution: def traverse(graph: Map[Int, Set[Int]], start: Int): List[Int] = { def childrenNotVisited(parent: Int, visited: List[Int]) = graph(parent) filter (x => !visited.contains(x)) @annotation.tailrec def loop(stack: Set[Int], visited: List[Int]): List[Int] = { if (stack isEmpty) visited else ...


3

The Floyd-Warshall generalization that gets a rough approximation of paths is this: procedure FloydWarshall () for k := 1 to n for i := 1 to n for j := 1 to n path[i][j] = path[i][j] + path[i][k]*path[k][j] Here is a very rough idea on how to scale this. Disclaimer - This isn't concrete -it's very hand wavy, but ...


3

Have you thought how many such paths can exist? In such a graph with V vertices, you have about V^2 different pairs. Let's imagine a worst case scenario where you have a full graph (one where edges exist between every pair). Paths can have anywhere between 1 edge and V-1 edges, because you do not allow duplicate vertices in a path. Between each pair of ...


3

Can't offer a complete solution, but it looks related to the travelling salesman problem where the unknown edges are the nodes to be visited. But I think you can't find an optimal solution a priori. Consider this example a-b = 1 b-c = ? b-d = ? a-d = 10 if b-c has low weight (say 1) the shortest path starting from a is a-b-c-b-d which traverses b-c ...


3

Cycles starting and ending at a and including [b,d] simply means cycle must visit nodes a,b,d. [a,b,d,a] = [b,d,a,b] (cycles right). Your problem is called k-TSP. See here. But this is very hard to implement and may not be what you are looking for. So I will just give you a simpler way. First construct shortest cycle that passes through just these nodes. ...


3

Use binary search on the minimal edge weight: Assume your search interval is [m, M]. For a set value L = (m + M) / 2, use BFS or DFS to find a path from source to destination such that all edges have weight >= L. If you can do this, set m = L + 1 and repeat the search. If you cannot do this, set M = L - 1 and repeat the search. This will be O((edges + ...


3

You could avoid passing around the path by returning None on failure, and a partial path on success. In this way, you do not keep some sort of 'breadcrumb trail' from the root to the current node, but you only construct a path from the target back to the root if you find it. Untested code: def VisitNode(self, node, target): # Base case. If we found the ...



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