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5

If you had tried debugging it you would have very quickly found the problem lies with the line: TRvii(AdjList[u],it) Think about what u is. In the first go around the while loop u == s due to pq.push(ii(0,s));. In the next, and all subsequent loops however, u == INF due to REP(i,1,V) pq.push(ii(i,INF));. Trying to access AdjList[INF] is "bad" and ...


3

Since you entered hold off before, you need hold on after the first plot. Otherwise, your plots will be replaced. plot(x,pdfNormal_1,'-'); hold on; plot(x,pdfNormal_2,':') plot(x,pdfNormal_3,'--')


3

The axis function is the one you need. you can set the axis to the values you want using axis([xmin xmax ymin ymax]) or you can play with it doing things like: axis equal axis tight axis off etc Go to the documentation for more info: http://www.mathworks.co.uk/help/matlab/ref/axis.html?refresh=true


2

Hint: See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B-tree#Best_case_and_worst_case_heights in your case [log 1000] = 7 so the worst case is 7. Why?


2

Try this, x = -.5:0.0001:3.5; m1 = 1; s1 = 0.5; pdfNormal_1 = normpdf(x, m1, s1); set(gcf,'color','w'); plot(x, pdfNormal_1)%, x, pdfNormal_2); ylim([0 1.5])


2

If you already know the ranges you want displayed, skip calling -scaleToFitPlots: and set the xRange and yRange directly.


2

You can use fancy indexing to assign the values of G directly from your X array: import numpy as np X = np.array([[0,1,1,2,2,3,3,3], [0,1,1,2,2,3,3,4], [0,1,5,5,5,5,3,4]]) G = np.zeros([X.max() + 1]*2) # left-right pairs G[X[:, :-1], X[:, 1:]] = 1 # right-left pairs G[X[:, 1:], X[:, :-1]] = 1 # top-bottom pairs G[X[:-1, :], ...


2

for i in range(1,2) is a loop which only iterates once. Maybe you plan on increasing the number of iterations? If so, bear in mind that it's quicker to load the data once, rather than multiple times in a for-loop. You can do that using np.genfromtxt with the usecols parameter to specify the desired columns. To find the area under the curve, you could use ...


2

The problem is that k=list1.index(x) can only find the first occurrence of x in list1. So you could put a loop here, using the extended form of index(): list1.index(x, start, end) which only looks for an index that lies in the range(start, end) The loop would have to contain a try: ... except block to handle the ValueError exception. But there's another ...


2

You could call setheading(180) to make the turtle look West: import turtle smiles = turtle.Turtle() smiles.penup() smiles.goto(-75,150) smiles.pendown() smiles.circle(10) #eye one smiles.penup() smiles.goto(75,150) smiles.pendown() smiles.circle(10) #eye two smiles.penup() smiles.goto(0,0) smiles.pendown() smiles.circle(100,90) #right smile ...


2

You can specify a separate symbol for every data point. Just provide an array instead of a single value for the pch-option of plot symbol <- rep(16,nrow(df)) symbol[df$prevalence >30] <- 21 plot(df$month, df$prevalence,lwd = 1.8, ylim=c(0,40),pch=symbol, bty='n', ylab="Prevalence (%)", xlab="Month",col='black',cex=1,cex.lab=1.0,cex.axis=1.0)


2

Try: mydf<-structure(list(Name = structure(1:5, .Label = c("A", "B", "C", "D", "E"), class = "factor"), Marks = c(65L, 78L, 55L, 66L, 93L )), .Names = c("Name", "Marks"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, -5L)) barplot(mydf$Marks,names.arg=mydf$Name)


1

The way I read it, they are saying that there are 2^(V^2) ways of building a directed graph with V vertices. Since there are a total of V^2 possible edges, and each possible edge can either be present or not present in a given graph, this is the number of combinations. In the example with 2 vertices, and using your notation, the sets of edges for the 16 ...


1

In the graph case, a clustering method based on minimum spanning trees can be used. The regular algorithm is the following: Find the minimum spanning tree of the graph. Remove the k - 1 longest edges in the spanning tree, where k is the desired number of clusters. However, this works only if the edges differ in length (or weight). In the case of edges ...


1

Your camera near plane is at 0.1 but the far plane value is very large. Try lowering it.


1

Both graph-cut segmentation examples are strongly related. The authors of Image Processing, Analysis, and Machine Vision: A MATLAB Companion book (first example) used the graph cut wrapper code of Shai Bagon (with the author's permission naturally) - the second example. So, what is the data term anyway? The data term represent how each pixel independently ...


1

This would probably not pass the 'Tufte' test, but might be a step in the right direction: library(ggplot2) data <- data.frame(cbind(c('A', 'B', 'C', 'D'), c(65, 78, 55, 66))) names(data) <- c('name', 'marks') ggplot(data, aes(x=name, y=marks)) + geom_bar(stat="identity")


1

It seems greedy works here while k >= 2 mark all leaves of the tree and remove them k = k - 2; if ( k == 1 ) mark any 1 of remaining vertices


1

Something like this...? barplot(-mtcars$cyl, horiz = TRUE, axes=FALSE) axis(1, at=-0:-8, labels=0:8)


1

If you have several 1D variables, lets say, saved in a variable A; you want to create an image (or a mesh) with all your data. So I would do img=A(:,1); for ii=2:size(A,2) img=horzcat(img,A(:,2)) end imshow(img) colormap gray colorbar EDIT: As you dont have image processing toolbox, you can do it this other way A=rand(100,50) % sample data I created ...


1

One common way to store graphs is to use an n-by-n matrix, where n is the number of vertices in the graph. If you simply wanted to store the adjacency, if X is the matrix, then X[i][j] = 1 if vertex j is reachable from vertex i, and 0 otherwise. You could also store edge costs or edge capacities in this manner. The disadvantage is of course the amount of ...


1

use template classes for example template<class t1> class node { public: t1 value; node * link; void getdata(t1 val) { value=val; } }; now you can deal with any type of data


1

Well, I can slightly clean up your query - this might help us understand the issues better. I doubt this one will run faster, but using the cleaned up version we can discuss what's going on: (mostly eliminating unneeded uses of MATCH/WITH) MATCH (parent:Node {nodeid: {ID_parentnode_hierarchy_01}})<-[:REL* {reltype:{isA}}]- ...


1

Maybe you are thinking of what Larry and Sergey called "Personalized PageRank"? You can adjust the weighting of the nodes in the random jump part of the algorithm to create a bias. E.g. In [1]: import networkx as nx In [2]: G = nx.DiGraph() In [3]: G.add_path([1,2,3,4]) In [4]: nx.pagerank_numpy(G) Out[4]: {1: 0.11615582303660349, 2: ...


1

I believe that this problem is NP-hard for arbitrary directed acyclic graphs. The corresponding problem for undirected graphs is known to be NP-hard, and that problem can be converted into the directed version of the problem by directing all of the edges in a way that makes the resulting graph a DAG. Any independent set in the original graph will be an ...


1

Add vertex *parent to your vertex class whatever that is, and add one more input *vertex to your push function and change this line: myQueue.push(extractList((*it)->name, listVertices)); to this: myQueue.push(extractList((*it)->name, listVertices),*vert); after you myQueue.pop(); check if poped node is your destination if it is, break from while ...


1

Pioja's answer is indeed a great one. His jsFiddle shows the full details. It is important to have the following included in your options: canvas: true, grid: { margin: { top:50 } } This will then insert a nice chart title which can be included in the image if you export it.



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