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6

It works using the logical fonts. SANS_SERIF will be Arial (primarily) on Windows. import java.awt.*; import javax.swing.*; public class FontTestWithJapaneseCharacters { private JComponent ui = null; class PaintingSurface extends JPanel { @Override public Dimension getPreferredSize() { return new Dimension(400, 20); ...


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It's a very old technique for drawing a shape without clearing the screen. If you want to draw a moving rectangle, the idea is to draw only the difference between the previous frame and the new one (adding the new parts, erasing the old ones, leaving the common part untouched). The XOR trick is that if you draw something with it, it sets your color to the ...


2

x2=e.getX(); y2=e.getY(); repaint(); x1=x2; y1=y2; x1 and x2 will be the same after this regardless of where you call repaint() -- not very useful. Instead do the assignment before getting the mouse position. x1=x2; y1=y2; x2=e.getX(); y2=e.getY(); repaint(); If you want to ...


1

Instead of having an infinite loop, create a timer control. Set the Interval to 20 (thats 20 ms). In the OnTick create an Method that: 1) Send the Enabled property of your timer to 'False' 2) Calls your upLoadData and drawGraphics methods 3) Sets the Enabled property of your timer to 'True' This way you won't simultaneously try to access the data on the ...


1

Usually the way to handle an occasional-update requirement in a GUI app is to use a timer. The timer runs on a background thread and notifies the main thread occasionally that a "tick" has occurred. This way, other operations like processing mouse and keyboard input, drawing to the screen, etc. can continue. I'm not entirely sure why your solution isn't ...


1

Apple's current recommendation is to develop on a device-agnostic Storyboard file and use the new API of Size Classes You can find a lot of resources on SO for using Size Classes.


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They way I personally do it is by using a Storyboard. I find it easiest since that was the way I was brought up in iOS Development. As far as supporting multiple devices, you only need one storyboard and you just need to set constraints using autolayout to everything in your Storyboard's View Controllers. That way it'll support all devices regardless of ...


1

One way to store material ID is by passing that ID to fragment shader as a uniform, and write it to your G-buffer. Assuming that your buffer is 4 channels RGBA8, and material ID is unsigned 8-bit int, which supports 265 materials, your fragment shader in G-buffer pass will look something like this (pseudo): uniform uint inMatId; uniform sampler2D inTexture; ...


1

You cannot have a vertex shader by itself. When using the programmable pipeline, you need to have both a vertex shader and a fragment shader. From section 3.9 "Fragment Shaders" in the OpenGL 3.3 spec: When the program object currently in use includes a fragment shader, its fragment shader is considered active, and is used to process fragments. If the ...


1

The problem is you're trying to manipulate the instance variable dynamicRect from a static context, i.e. from outside of an instance method. Here are your options: Create a method to do your initialization, and call it where appropriate. For example: private void setupRects() { dynamicRect.set(200,200,300,300); // do other stuff } You could also ...


1

Before any advice can be given you need to determine what data you want to group together. Perhaps you can group your data by gender/age. This can be done by changing 'color = Name' into 'color = Gender' if that column exists in your data. The color scheme can be changed with scale_brewer. However, in every palette there are limited colors available so it ...


1

On components with complex output, repaint() should be invoked with arguments which define only the rectangle that needs updating, rather than the no-arg version, which causes the entire component to be repainted. Swing's implementation of paint() factors the call into 3 separate callbacks: paintComponent() paintBorder() paintChildren() ...


1

You can try to index the color vector by the values in your matrix. For example: image(m1, col=terrain.colors(50)[m1]); image(m2, col=terrain.colors(50)[m2]) terrain.colors(50) is a vector of 50 colors. Since m1 goes from 1 to 50 terrain.colors(50)[m1] will be equal to terrain.colors(50), and you will get colors 1 to 50. m2 has decimal numbers from 20 ...


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Store Shape instances in a List. At time of painting, iterate the list and draw each one. When one shape is removed, remove it from the list and call repaint().


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There's two meanings. Using XOR is how you implement rubber banding on a 1970s or 1980s era GUI, when the computers weren't fast enough to redraw the entire screen at interactive rates. (Except for a few heroic/insane assembly language efforts.) As a user interaction technique, rubber banding was being able to draw a line by pressing the mouse button down ...


1

You could try this, the idea is to find the points for each group that would be at the separation of the two regions, then take the middle of these two points and get a LOESS line as boundary: library(dplyr) #make column c numeric and order the dataframe dt$c<-dt$c*1 dt<-dt[order(a,c),] #get all the points that are where the change of "region" ...


1

Canvas draws in a so-called "immediate-mode", it doesn't keep track of painted contents. But you can use renderingContext.isPointInPath() (https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/CanvasRenderingContext2D/isPointInPath) to test if a point, i.e. the coordinate of a mouse-click, is within a path. This function must be used while drawing, so using this ...



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