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70

Now I like ggplot as much as the next guy, but if you want to make the Google Finance type charts, why not just do it with the Google graphics API?!? You're going to love this: install.packages("googleVis") library(googleVis) dates <- seq(as.Date("2011/1/1"), as.Date("2011/12/31"), "days") happiness <- rnorm(365)^ 2 happiness[333:365] <- ...


40

Sure! To set the ticks, just, well... Set the ticks (see matplotlib.pyplot.xticks or ax.set_xticks). (Also, you don't need to manually set the facecolor of the patches. You can just pass in a keyword argument.) For the rest, you'll need to do some slightly more fancy things with the labeling, but matplotlib makes it fairly easy. As an example: import ...


39

Have a look at this flot example which demonstrates tooltips for plot points on the chart. (Make sure you select the Enable tooltip checkbox.)


31

The new GitHub graphs are built with the amazing d3 library by @mbostock. http://github.com/mbostock/d3 This was taken directly from https://github.com/blog/1093-introducing-the-new-github-graphs


30

As much as I like @JD Long's answer, I'll put one that is just in R/ggplot2. The approach is to create a second data set of events and to use that to determine positions. Starting with what @Angelo had: library(ggplot2) data(presidential) data(economics) Pull out the event (presidential) data, and transform it. Compute baseline and offset as fractions ...


29

you can check the documentation yourself. I find it quite comprehensive. I have very little experience with gnuplot-py, so I can not say. Matplotlib is written in and designed specifically for Python, so it fits very nicely with Python idioms and such. Matplotlib is a mature project. NASA uses it for some stuff. I've plotted tens of millions of points in ...


29

use labelpad parameter: pl.xlabel("...", labelpad=20) or set it after: ax.xaxis.labelpad = 20


27

Here is a classic solution. (Supposing your dataframe is named df ) data <- tapply(df$total_dist, list(df$groupname,df$bin), sum) barplot(data,beside=T,col=c("#ee7700","#3333ff") ,main="European Parliament Elections",xlab="Group",ylab="Seats") legend(locator(1),rownames(data),fill=c("#ee7700","#3333ff")) and here is solution using ggplot2 ...


24

You're much better off using ggsave to save the figure as a eps or svg, then opening it in Illustrator (or open source equivalent) and replacing the legend with the images. If you're really dead set on doing it all in R, you can use annotation_raster in the current ggplot2 and add in some text next to it using geom_text. Here is a rough attempt: ...


23

If you are using the 'pylab' for interactive plotting you can set the labelsize at creation time with pylab.ylabel('Example', fontsize=40). If you use pyplot programmatically you can either set the fontsize on creation with ax.set_ylabel('Example', fontsize=40) or afterwards with ax.yaxis.label.set_size(40).


23

You can have the best of both worlds: automatic "escaping" of LaTeX commands and newlines: plt.ylabel( r"My long label with unescaped {\LaTeX} $\Sigma_{C}$ math" "\n" r"continues here with $\pi$" ) (spaces only added for legibility: single spaces would suffice). In fact, Python automatically concatenates string literals that follow each other, ...


19

One way, which isn't particularly clean and especially won't work nicely if you plan to show x- and y-axis tick labels at the same time, is to set the labelMargin option on the grid to a negative value. var plot = $.plot(placeholder, data, { ... grid: { ..., labelMargin: -20, ... } ... }); A second idea could be to grab all div's which have ...


17

I'm surprised no one has mentioned JQPlot yet. I'm not entirely sure it will do everything you need, but it's a very, very capable library. It's in jQuery, just to note. Demos of JQPlot here JQPlot can fit all your needs, it seems: Line Graphs JQPlot supports these just fine, as you'd expect Histograms Histograms are just bar charts, so that should be ...


16

What you are looking for is essentially called a prediction interval. Here is one way to do it in ggplot2 library(ggplot2) # RUN REGRESSION AND APPEND PREDICTION INTERVALS lm_fit = lm(total_bill ~ tip, data = tips) tips_with_pred = data.frame(tips, predict(lm_fit, interval = 'prediction')) # PLOT WITH REGRESSION LINE, CONFIDENCE INTERVAL AND PREDICTION ...


15

matplotlib has pretty good documentation, and seems to be quite stable. The plots it produces are beautiful - "publication quality" for sure. Due to the good documentation and the amount of example code available online, it's easy to learn and use, and I don't think you'll have much trouble translating gnuplot code to it. After all, matplotlib is being used ...


14

Is this what you want? set xdata time set timefmt "%s" # set xtics 3600 set format x "%H:%M:%S" # or whatever plot ...


14

Just look at what sin and cos actually mean in a circle: If you have a point on a circle which forms an angle alpha, the cos alpha is the x-part of the point a sin alpha is the y part. This illustration explains, why the angle is negated. It means, that you can now specify clockwise angles, which most people with analogue clocks prefer.


12

Try TeeChart http://www.steema.com/


12

Edit: I'd had this open and left, so I didn't notice @Ricardo's answer. Because matplotlib will convert things to numpy arrays regardless, there are more efficient ways to do it. As an example: Just plot two different lines, one with a dashed linestyle and another with a solid linestyle. E.g. import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt x = ...


11

This tries to answer all your questions. The code below cycles a maximum of 7 colors. If you need more you should create a more sofisticated generator, as that shown in another answer. import numpy as np from matplotlib import pyplot as plt def get_color(): for item in ['r', 'g', 'b', 'c', 'm', 'y', 'k']: yield item x = 0.3 * ...


11

MS just released one if you are using 3.5 or you could use ZedGraph EDIT: The Link is Just a ASP.NET demo they have a Windows Forms Release as well with DEMOS Microsofts Chart Control


11

There's the newer, open source, Core Plot.


10

After using GNUplot (with my own Python wrapper) for a long time (and really not liking the 80s-looking output), I just started having a look at matplotlib. I must say I like it very much, the output looks really nice and the docs are high quality and extensive (although that also goes for GNUplot). The one thing I spent ages looking for in the matplotlib ...


10

Here is one way. For some dummy data set.seed(2) dat <- rnorm(100, mean = 3, sd = 3) compute the summary sdat <- summary(dat) We can then paste together the names of the summary statistics and their values using paste(), and collapse this to a single string summStr <- paste(names(sdat), format(sdat, digits = 2), collapse = "; ") Note that I ...


9

This behavior is normal. Interpolation methods impose certain continuity conditions in order to give the appearance of a smooth curve. For Hermite interpolation, there is no condition that the interpolating curve through a sequence of increasing values must also be increasing everywhere, and so sometimes you get the effect you show here. There is something ...


9

First, do not double post! If necessary edit your previous question, rather than posting a new question. Second, the error message that you mentioned in your earlier post is pretty self-explanatory. Here's the error message: Error in barplot.default(ufc.means, col = rainbow(20), names.arg = (ufc.means$Species), : 'height' must be a vector or a matrix ...


9

The above answer does not work, as it is explained in the comments. I suggest to use spines. import matplotlib.pyplot as plt fig = plt.figure() ax = fig.add_subplot(111) # you can change each line separately, like: #ax.spines['right'].set_linewidth(0.5) # to change all, just write: for axis in ['top','bottom','left','right']: ...


9

It all depends on how you treat startAngle and endAngle. It looks like this is treating them as starting from horizontal to the right (i.e. an angle of 0 is pointing East) and going clockingwise (so an angle of 45 degrees is pointing South-East. Usually in mathematics we consider angles starting from the horizontal to the right, but increasing ...


8

This would be faster I guess: function getLengthForDeg(phi){ phi = ((phi+45)%90-45)/180*Math.PI; return 1/Math.cos(phi); }



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