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5

At 10000 nodes and 1M edges, you shouldn't have problems with plain Gremlin (no Faunus). See the code below where I generate a graph of approximately that size using Furnace: gremlin> g = TitanFactory.open('/tmp/titan/generated') ==>titangraph[local:/tmp/titan/generated] gremlin> import com.tinkerpop.furnace.generators.* ==>import ...


5

The first is gremlin-groovy syntax: g.V.has('name','hercules').next() and either iterates all vertices looking for vertices that have a "name" property with a value of "hercules". In the event that "name" is indexed then titan will utilize the index to avoid the linear scan to find such vertices. The second is basically Java and the Titan API. The ...


4

You can use the loop() and an emit-closure: g.V('name','a').as('here').out('fatherOf').out('wifeOf').loop('here'){true}{true}


4

I interpret this question several ways, but perhaps this is what you are after. One way would be to do: gremlin> g = TinkerGraphFactory.createTinkerGraph() ==>tinkergraph[vertices:6 edges:6] gremlin> g.V.outE.hasNot('label','knows') ==>e[9][1-created->3] ==>e[12][6-created->3] ==>e[10][4-created->5] ...


3

Iterating all vertices with g.V.count() is the only way to get the count. It can't be done "faster". If you're graph is so large that it takes hours to get an answer or your query just never returns at all, you should consider using Faunus. However, even with Faunus you can expect to wait for your answer (such is the nature of Hadoop...no sub-second ...


3

Updating the dictionary/map that comes off a vertex property circumvents the database level since you are directly modifying the value on the heap. In other words, Titan does not know that you updated the map and therefore does not persist the change. Always think of property values as immutable even though they might be mutable java objects because those ...


3

See Rexster Configuation. The <init-scripts> element defines one or more comma-separated script files that gets executed at the initialization of a Gremlin Script Engine. The initialization allows for the creation of user-defined steps and functions to be made available. Cheers, Daniel


3

I probably haven't covered the part B: ...in relation to each applicable term in Ts. ...but the rest should work as expected. I wrote a little helper function that accepts single terms as well as multiple terms: tfidf = { g, terms, N -> def closure = { def paths = it.outE("occursIn").inV().path().toList() def numPaths = paths.size() ...


3

It's pretty much the same in Java. Table t = new Table(); Vertex v1 = graph.getVertex(1); new GremlinPipeline<Vertex, Vertex>(v1).out("knows").as("x").out("created").as("y").table(t).iterate(); Cheers, Daniel


3

If you use Titan server via the shell or bat script, it will automatically start a Titan instance for you and attempt to connect to it over localhost. When you configured it to use Cassandra embedded, the two instances naturally conflict. Is there a particular reason you want to use Cassandra embedded. I'd strongly encourage you to try the out-of-the-box ...


3

There are multiple ways to do this. If you really want to co-mingle the people and cars in a single list you can use the store pipe: list = [] pipe.has("name", "NY").in("lives").has("gender", "male").store(list).out('owns').store(list).iterate() list If you wish to maintain the relationships between the people and their (perhaps multiple) cars then I ...


3

Bulbs was designed to make it easy to work with multiple graph databases. Configure your rexster.xml for each Neo4j database you want to run (each will have a different name and thus a different URL path), and then create a separate Bulbs Config and Graph object for each database: >>> from bulbs.rexster import Graph, Config >>> ...


3

The order step is an in-memory function that is not "pushed-down" to Titan as part of a Vertex Query. That said, I suppose that use of order may end up being redundant to the query if the order defined by the vertex centric index matches the order defined by the query.


3

Since you asked for either Cypher or Gremlin, below are the Cypher queries. It was not obvious to me that your data model had any node labels, so here are some queries that only include user nodes that have watched at least 1 movie. This limitation stems from the fact that there is no way to identify that a node without a watched outgoing relationship is ...


3

Here's the Gremlin approach...first for movies watched per person (note that this code is written to be run in the Gremlin REPL): m = [:] g.E.has('label','watched').groupCount(m){it.outV.next()}.iterate() The above code shows that we iterate all "watched" edges and group on the out vertex of each "watched" edge (i.e. the user vertex). The group count is ...


3

it's not really straight forward, hence I'm going to show it using an example. Let's start with the Graph of the Gods + an additional index for god names: g = TitanFactory.open("conf/titan-cassandra-es.properties") GraphOfTheGodsFactory.load(g) m = g.getManagementSystem() name = m.getPropertyKey("name") god = m.getVertexLabel("god") ...


2

Take a look at the Pattern Match Pattern described here: https://github.com/tinkerpop/gremlin/wiki/Pattern-Match-Pattern startVertex.outE('e1').as('e') .inV().hasProperty('number').inE("e2") .outV().hasProperty("id") .outE("e3") .inV().hasProperty("number").as('d') .table(t) This should give an iterator of maps [e:e1, d:D] From each of these maps, you ...


2

Here's the Gremlin with all the same caveats as the accepted answer from jjaderberg (i.e. expensive so trying to limit what you touch in the graph will likely be necessary): gremlin> g = new TinkerGraph() ==>tinkergraph[vertices:0 edges:0] gremlin> ...


2

You need to next() your pipeline in the filter. It should be: .filter{ it.out('SOURCE').email.next() == 'someone@email.com' } Without the next you are doing an equality on a Pipeline which will never return true. As an added suggestion I would recommend you change your emit closure (the second one) on the loop. The emit closure controls the items ...


2

The best approach is to simply store the date as a Long value and to possibly index upon such a field in an edge such that you could take advantage of limit(), interval, etc. See this Titan wiki page on the topic: https://github.com/thinkaurelius/titan/wiki/Vertex-Centric-Indices It maps to your specific request with a Twitter example where it indexes on ...


2

Your code looks to be somewhat similar to the the shortest path recipe in GremlinDocs: http://gremlindocs.com/#recipes/shortest-path You might want to read that section in full as you are evaluating both directions of a vertex which has consequences and has been shown to be better handled with the store/except pattern. Once you have all the paths need to ...


2

I think you need to iterate your pipeline when within the get_similar_documents function. Meaning: v.as('x').out('auto_tag').in('auto_tag').has('status', 1).except('x').groupCount(m).filter{false}.iterate() It's important to remember that the Gremlin Shell automatically iterates pipelines for you. The shell isn't iterating it within the function so no ...


2

My gremlin-java/pipeline isn't as good as my gremlin-groovy, but one problem I see is that you aren't dealing with vertex equality properly in Java. This part: && bundle.getObject() != v2 is valid for Groovy, but in Java I would write it as: && !bundle.getObject().equals(v2)


2

That doesn't look like valid Gremlin syntax from the REPL: gremlin> g = new Neo4jGraph('/tmp/neo4j') ==>neo4jgraph[EmbeddedGraphDatabase [/tmp/neo4j]] gremlin> g.addVertex([name:'stephen']) ==>v[0] gremlin> g.V.map ==>{name=stephen} gremlin> g.commit() ==>null gremlin> g.shutdown() ==>null gremlin> g = new ...


2

Without messing with your code too much, maybe the easiest thing is to do: results = [] as Set vert.as('l'). bothE.as('e').gather.scatter.as('edge').bothV.or( _().has("time").filter{ it.getProperty('time').toInteger() >= startTime.toInteger()}.store(results), _().has("isRead"), _().has("isWrite")).store(results)) ...


2

I don't think that your last query will support the optimization. Picking apart your query: new GremlinPipeline(graph.getVertices()).has("dmdid", id).has("type", type).cast(classOf[Vertex]).toList() You are feeding all the vertices in the graph into the pipeline which them iterates them out into the has where your index is. As such, the rest of the ...


2

espeed's answer is good. Here's another alternative: gremlin> g = TinkerGraphFactory.createTinkerGraph() ==>tinkergraph[vertices:6 edges:6] gremlin> v1 = g.v(1) ==>v[1] gremlin> v3 = g.v(3) ==>v[3] gremlin> v6 = g.v(6) ==>v[6] gremlin> v1.out.retain([v3]).hasNext() ==>true gremlin> v1.out.retain([v6]).hasNext() ==>false ...


2

What you are seeing in the second example is the String representation of a pipeline. Both of your example queries return pipelines, but when the Gremlin console sees a pipeline returned it automatically reads all the data out of it and displays it. If you wish to use the data returned from a nested pipeline within a larger query as you do in the second ...


2

There are two APIs for getting data because one represents a Blueprints-level which is a lower level of abstraction having utility-level functions for accessing graphs and Gremlin-level which is a higher level of abstraction having a much higher degree of expressivity when traversing graphs. The design principle is built around the fact that Blueprints is ...


2

Ok, you've already found out, that it's currently impossible in Gremlin and only available through the Query API. Regarding the performance: Your two approaches won't make a difference; under the hood both queries generate the same Cassandra/HBase query (or whatever storage backend you are using). Cheers, Daniel



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