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5

Converting Gremlin Groovy to Gremlin Java shouldn't be very difficult. I would always argue against doing it as you will: Greatly increase the size of your code Make your code less readable Make your code harder to maintain If you work in a "Java shop" that won't hear of an outside programming language, I think that it's not too hard to sell folks on ...


5

The first is gremlin-groovy syntax: g.V.has('name','hercules').next() and either iterates all vertices looking for vertices that have a "name" property with a value of "hercules". In the event that "name" is indexed then titan will utilize the index to avoid the linear scan to find such vertices. The second is basically Java and the Titan API. The ...


4

it's not really straight forward, hence I'm going to show it using an example. Let's start with the Graph of the Gods + an additional index for god names: g = TitanFactory.open("conf/titan-cassandra-es.properties") GraphOfTheGodsFactory.load(g) m = g.getManagementSystem() name = m.getPropertyKey("name") god = m.getVertexLabel("god") ...


4

Here's how you do it in Gremlin: gremlin> g = TinkerGraphFactory.createTinkerGraph() ==>tinkergraph[vertices:6 edges:6] gremlin> g.v(2).addEdge("knows", g.v(6)) ==>e[0][2-knows->6] gremlin> g.v(6).addEdge("knows", g.v(1)) ==>e[1][6-knows->1] gremlin> v = g.v(1); v.as("v").out().dedup().loop("v") {true} {it.object == v}.path() ...


4

I'm not sure it is possible to manipulate OrientDB schema through Gremlin. Gremlin is independent on OrientDB and is not adapted on schemas because not all of graph databases support schemas. For adding vertex of particular class in OrientDB you can use Graph API (see doc). If you prepend string class: before the name of the class, you will create a vertex ...


3

Looking at your code, you are using the Graph API. After calling getRawGraph() you are not working with the Graph API any more, but with the Document API (method name is a little bit confusing). Having a reference to the OrientGraph there are several possibilities Using orientGraph#getVertex*(..) / orientGraph#getVertices*(..)style of methods Using a ...


3

You can avoid getting the rawGraph and executed command directly with orientGraph and returns an iterable of OrientVertex like this : graph = factory.getTx(); String string = String.format("select * from V where name like \"%s\"", criteria); OSQLSynchQuery<OrientVertex> qr = new OSQLSynchQuery<OrientVertex>(query); Iterable<OrientVertex> ...


3

This should use an index: g.V().has("type" T.in, ["typeA","typeB"]) though I think the 0.5.x line had a bug out there for it. In the mean time you could do: gremlin> g = TinkerGraphFactory.createTinkerGraph() ==>tinkergraph[vertices:6 edges:6] gremlin> ["marko","josh"]._().transform{g.V('name',it).next()} ==>v[1] ==>v[4]


3

Just to close the loop on this here in SO - a GitHub issue has been created for this problem (TinkerGraph does show the correct behavior): https://github.com/thinkaurelius/titan/issues/868 Please follow the resolution there.


3

I see the titan tag so I'm going to give a Titan-specific answer. With Titan, you can add properties to properties. So if you are tagging types by using properties instead of Vertex Labels then you can definitely add meta-properties. That said, types are typically modeled using Vertex Labels and Edge Labels. Property Types, Vertex Labels, and Edge Labels ...


3

Ok, you've already found out, that it's currently impossible in Gremlin and only available through the Query API. Regarding the performance: Your two approaches won't make a difference; under the hood both queries generate the same Cassandra/HBase query (or whatever storage backend you are using). Cheers, Daniel


3

Here's the Gremlin approach...first for movies watched per person (note that this code is written to be run in the Gremlin REPL): m = [:] g.E.has('label','watched').groupCount(m){it.outV.next()}.iterate() The above code shows that we iterate all "watched" edges and group on the out vertex of each "watched" edge (i.e. the user vertex). The group count is ...


3

Since you asked for either Cypher or Gremlin, below are the Cypher queries. It was not obvious to me that your data model had any node labels, so here are some queries that only include user nodes that have watched at least 1 movie. This limitation stems from the fact that there is no way to identify that a node without a watched outgoing relationship is ...


3

I would leverage Gremlin's tree structure and some recursive method calls: import com.google.common.collect.Iterators; import com.tinkerpop.gremlin.process.T; import com.tinkerpop.gremlin.process.Traverser; import com.tinkerpop.gremlin.process.graph.util.Tree; import com.tinkerpop.gremlin.structure.Vertex; import ...


3

You could do: g.V('description',CONTAINS,'developer').as('user').transform{it.bothE.toList()}.as('relationship').select in this way, you should get an empty list for those developers who don't have edges.


3

gremlin in cayley is only for traversals. https://github.com/google/cayley/blob/master/docs/GremlinAPI.md is the complete gremlin API for cayley. use http to add data: https://github.com/google/cayley/blob/master/docs/HTTP.md#apiv1write


3

Not sure if order is important if you just need to remove a parent node and all of it's children. I wrote a junit test that I think solves your problem. import com.tinkerpop.blueprints.Direction; import com.tinkerpop.blueprints.Graph; import com.tinkerpop.blueprints.Vertex; import com.tinkerpop.blueprints.impls.tg.TinkerGraph; import org.junit.Assert; ...


3

Here's a sample using the Tinkergraph toy graph: gremlin> vertices = g.v(2,3,5).toSet() ==>v[2] ==>v[3] ==>v[5] gremlin> vertices._().as("x").bothE().bothV().simplePath().loop("x") {it.loops <= 3} {it.object in vertices}.simplePath().path() {it} {it.label} ==>[v[2], knows, v[1], created, v[3]] ==>[v[2], knows, v[1], knows, v[4], ...


3

You could do: g.V('type','product').or(_().has('discontinued', true), _().has('unitsInStock', 0)) See the or step in GremlinDocs.


3

Here's the sample data I used: graph = TinkerGraph.open() g = graph.traversal() v123=graph.addVertex(id,123,"description","developer","name","bob") v124=graph.addVertex(id,124,"description","developer","name","bill") v125=graph.addVertex(id,125,"description","developer","name","brandy") ...


3

Provided the index was created as a Hash type index. You can look it up by using this command : select from index:<index-name> where key = <key> as explained and documented in OrientDB Manual Indexes.


3

You should use the bothE() step -- either on its own or by including a label like bothE('SOMELABEL') If you only want incoming edges use inE(), and if you only want outgoing edges use outE(). g.V('ip_address','192.168.1.1').bothE() You can find more information on steps at gremlindocs.com.


3

That is not possible given the semantics of the Blueprints API (that Titan implements). If you really need that functionality, you could implement a GraphWrapper (like ReadOnlyGraph or PartitionGraph) and add that method. That might be a lot of boilerplate code to maintain for just one function though. If you are using Gremlin Groovy, I think the better ...


3

There is no such feature in Titan at this time. You would have to manage such logic manually as part of your delete of the vertex: g.v(123).in('some','labels','only').remove() g.v(123).remove()


2

There are two APIs for getting data because one represents a Blueprints-level which is a lower level of abstraction having utility-level functions for accessing graphs and Gremlin-level which is a higher level of abstraction having a much higher degree of expressivity when traversing graphs. The design principle is built around the fact that Blueprints is ...


2

To add to @mscdex valid answer. This is JavaScript-flavored Gremlin code in Node.js using direct Java bindings via node-java. Gremlin is not a language per se but a DSL. It is most of the time written in Groovy (because of its shortened syntax over Java), but it also exists in any JVM-compliant languages (ie. Java, Groovy, Scala, JavaScript via rhino and ...


2

You don't have the right syntax for TinkerPop3. To create the "classic" graph from TinkerPop2 you have to do: \,,,/ (o o) -----oOOo-(3)-oOOo----- plugin activated: tinkerpop.server plugin activated: tinkerpop.utilities plugin activated: tinkerpop.tinkergraph gremlin> g = TinkerFactory.createClassic() ==>tinkergraph[vertices:6 ...


2

I don't think you need all the ifThenElse stuff. Assuming I now have your model right, I think you just need this: gremlin> g = new TinkerGraph() ==>tinkergraph[vertices:0 edges:0] gremlin> g = new TinkerGraph() ...


2

What you are seeing in the second example is the String representation of a pipeline. Both of your example queries return pipelines, but when the Gremlin console sees a pipeline returned it automatically reads all the data out of it and displays it. If you wish to use the data returned from a nested pipeline within a larger query as you do in the second ...


2

This is a very tough question, it seems you need design guidance not a quick neo4j question. Depending on how you're using spreading activation, it might be better not to modify the server, but I can't tell because your use case is probably involved. Keep in mind that you can always use neo4j as a graph store, and then put higher-level concepts like ...



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