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12

Just assign counter to grep, my $c = grep {/bcd/} keys %h; From perldoc In scalar context, returns the number of times the expression was true.


9

This happens because grep interprets --- as an option instead of a text to look for. Instead, use --: grep -- "---" your_file This way, you tell grep that the rest is not a command line option. Other options: use grep -e (see Kent's solution, as I added it when he had already posted it - didn't notice it until now): use awk (see anubhava's solution) or ...


8

Using Mojolicious command line tool mojo: mojo get http://www.google.com 'a' Outputs: <a class="gb1" href="http://www.google.com/imghp?hl=en&amp;tab=wi">Images</a> <a class="gb1" href="http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&amp;tab=wl">Maps</a> <a class="gb1" ...


7

Use the echo ${PIPESTATUS[@]} will print out the array of exit-statuses of all commands. $ ls | grep . | wc -l 28 $ echo ${PIPESTATUS[@]} 0 0 0 but $ ls | grep nonexistentfilename | wc -l 0 $ echo ${PIPESTATUS[@]} 0 1 0 #the grep returns 1 - pattern not found or $ ls nonexistentfilename | grep somegibberish | wc -l ls: ...


6

grep can count matching lines: grep -c 'lion' file Output: 2 Syntax: -c: Suppress normal output; instead print a count of matching lines for each input file. With the -v, --invert-match option (see below), count non-matching lines. (-c is specified by POSIX.)


6

Extract Fields Using the Standard Cut Command Use the pipe symbol as a field separator, and extract the 5th field using the standard cut command. For example: $ cut -d\| -f5 /tmp/corpus SAMD11 SAMD11 SAMD11 SAMD11 SAMD11 NOC2L NOC2L NOC2L KLHL17 NOC2L


6

You can do this using awk: awk 'NR==FNR {a[$0]; next} $0 in a {i=0} ++i>3' names.dat text.dat NR==FNR means that the total record number equals the record number of the current file (this is only true for the first file). Use the lines of names.dat to set keys in the array a. next skips to the next line of the input, ignoring any of the other commands ...


6

There's no need for regex here. Just use apply + tail + na.omit: > apply(mydf, 1, function(x) tail(na.omit(x), 1)) [1] "Cucumber" "Apple" "Lime" "Honey" I don't know how this compares in terms of speed, but you You can also use a combination of "data.table" and "reshape2", like this: library(data.table) library(reshape2) ...


5

The messages that you see appear to be standard error messages, not standard output. You can read more about redirection here. As such, you'd need to merge STDERR with STDOUT before piping the output to grep: STATUS=`pvs /dev/sdb 2>&1 | grep failed` Moreover, the other form of command substitution instead of using backticks is somewhat more ...


5

You can use this: awk '/^Amount/ {amount+=$2} END {print amount+0}' file With the +0 trick you make it print 0 in case the value is not set. Explanation There is no need to grep + awk. awk alone can grep (and many more things!): /^Amount/ {} on lines starting with "Amount", perform what is in {}. amount+=$2 add field 2's value to the counter "amount". ...


5

To get the strings that are in the first file and also in the second file: grep -of file1 file2 The result (using the given example) will be: Apple Bat To get the strings that are in the first file but not in the second file, you could: grep -of file1 file2 | cat - file1 | sort | uniq -u Or even simpler (thanks to @triplee's comment): grep -of ...


5

You could use awk, $ awk -F\| '{print $5}' file SAMD11 SAMD11 SAMD11 SAMD11 NOC2L NOC2L NOC2L KLHL17 NOC2L If you want to remove the duplicates then pass the awk output to sort -u, $ awk -F\| '{print $5}' file | sort -u KLHL17 NOC2L SAMD11 As suggested by @jaypal, you could use the below awk one-liner command to remove the duplicates . awk -F\| ...


5

Like Avinash Raj's awk solution, this can be done in Perl, exactly the same way. You can also include the same deduping process: perl -F'\|' -lane'print $F[4] if !$seen{$F[4]}++;' yourfile.txt The !$seen{$F[4]}++ statement returns true for any new keys in the %seen hash. The -a switch is autosplit, to which -F sets the delimiter (in form of a regex). ...


5

month=$(cal | head -1 | grep -oP "[A-Za-z]+") or month=$(date +%B)


5

I don't have Mac OS X handy to test it with, but the following is Posix-standard afaik: grep -l "$ID" csvfolder/* | wc -l The grep will print the name of each file which contains a match. That should work with Gnu grep equally.


5

No need to use select just use [ instead data[,grepl("search_string", colnames(data))] Let's try with iris dataset >iris[,grepl("Sepal", colnames(iris))] Sepal.Length Sepal.Width 1 5.1 3.5 2 4.9 3.0 3 4.7 3.2 4 4.6 3.1 5 5.0 3.6 6 5.4 3.9


5

Within the dplyr world, try: select(iris,contains("Sepal")) See the Selection section in ?select for numerous other helpers like starts_with, ends_with, etc.


4

This is because what you see comes from stderr and you are catching just stdin. Just redirect stderr to stdin like this: 2>&1 So that your variable is defined as follows: STATUS=$(pvs /dev/sdb 2>&1 | grep failed) Note also I am using the $() syntax, which is commonly preferred over ``. Basically, because it allows you to nest them. ...


4

Another way is to escape each - with a backslash. grep '\-\-\-' your_file Escaping only the first - works too: grep '\---' your_file An alternative without quotes: grep \\--- your_file


4

You can try this awk, awk -F"-[0-9]+" '{print $1}' yourfile (OR) awk 'BEGIN{ FS="-[0-9]+" } {print $1}' yourfile Another way ( as Jotne commented ): awk -F"-[0-9]" '{$0=$1}1' yourfile


4

use grep's -e option, it is the right option for your requirement: -e PATTERN, --regexp=PATTERN Use PATTERN as the pattern. This can be used to specify multiple search patterns, or to protect a pattern beginning with a hyphen (-). (-e is specified by POSIX.) to protect a pattern beginning with a hyphen (-)


4

You should use adequate tools to work with JSON data, e.g. jq (lightweight and flexible command-line JSON processor) as trying to parse JSON with awk/grep/sed is always a bad idea as they don't "understand" the JSON format. echo '{ "id" : "0cba-2dbc-11e4-8c2c-bb68" }' | jq '.id' "0cba-2dbc-11e4-8c2c-bb68"


4

This mostly does what you want. The only problem (I know of offhand) is that it collapses runs of blank lines in the input into a single blank line in the output. awk -v RS= '!x[$0]++{print; print ""}' Use the fact that "If RS is set to the null string, then records are separated by blank lines." and print out an extra blank line for the RS that awk ...


4

Try For the first case: dat[Reduce(`|`,lapply(dat[9:11], function(x) grepl("0/1|1/0|1/1", x))),] For the second case based on the conditions mentioned: dat[ Reduce(`|`,lapply(dat[9:10], function(x) grepl("0/1|1/0|1/1", x))) & grepl("0/0", dat[,11]),] Update dat[ Reduce(`|`,lapply(dat[9:10], function(x) grepl("0/1|1/0|1/1", x))) ...


4

The problem is not with cut but with grep which expects a filename, but gets the line contents. Also, the expression doesn't match the IDs: they don't start with S followed by A, B, or D. You can process lines in bash without starting a subshell: while read line ; do echo 11th and 12th characters are: "${line:10:2}". done < temp.txt Your original ...


4

Turns out the relevant variable is actually grep-find-template. This takes a command with a few additional parameters: <D> for the base directory <X> for the find options to restrict directory list <F> for the find options to limit the files matched <C> for the place to put -i if the search is case-insensitive <R> for the ...


4

On systems that don't have grep -P like OSX you can use this awk command: awk -F 'foo' 'NF>1{s=$0; $1=""; if (!index($0,"bar")) print s}' file Script Demo


4

Yes. All free ram is be used to cache data read from your harddisk.


4

$USER:x: is the pattern you give to grep to search in /etc/passwd. It will return those lines containing $USER:x:, where $USER is the user with which you are currently working in the shell. Hence, the command will return the line in /etc/passwd in which your user is defined. If you check how the /etc/passwd file is stored then you see that the 2nd block is ...


4

$ awk 'NR==FNR{a[$1]=$2;next} {$3=a[$3];print}' <(tr , " " <Parameter) Records xxxx xxxx 9001 xxxx xxxx xxxx 9020 xxxx Explanation: Taking it one piece at a time: NR==FNR{a[$1]=$2;next} awk is processing two files, one after the other, one line at a time. NR is the total number of lines read and FNR is the number of lines read in the current ...



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