Hot answers tagged

9

You can play around with the agrep command. It can perform fuzzy, approximate matches. The following command worked for me: agrep -2 addition file


8

So you want to match any line starting with a three digit number, followed by "http"? grep -E '^[0-9]{3} http' file.txt More accurate as suggested by fedorqui (thanks) would be this: grep -E '^[1-5][0-9]{2} http' file.txt This matches numbers in the range 100-599, which is closer to the range of HTTP status codes.


6

The regexp below seems to work. I have added a line to your data.frame so that it's a more interesting example. I think the problem came from *s in your regexp, also added braces to define groups for the | but don't think it's mandatory here. df <- data.frame(Cause=c("jasper not able to read the property table after the release", ...


6

The code: $str = 'DAS-1111[DR-Helpfull-R]-RUN--[121668688374]-N-[+helpfull_+string]'; $re = '/([^-[]*(?:\[[^\]]*\])?[^-]*)-?/'; $matches = array(); preg_match_all($re, $str, $matches); print_r($matches[1]); Its output: Array ( [0] => DAS [1] => 1111[DR-Helpfull-R] [2] => RUN [3] => [4] => [121668688374] [5] => ...


5

You could try grep -o 'app_delay_max&quot;:[0-9]*' data.txt -o, --only-matching Print only the matched (non-empty) parts of a matching line, with each such part on a separate output line.


5

With GNU awk (due to multi-char RS), you can set the record separator to //, so that every record is a //-delimited set of characters: $ awk -v RS="//" '/MATCH THIS LINE/' file get the whole block 1 MATCH THIS LINE get the whole block 2 get the whole block 3 Note this leaves an empty line above and below because it catches the new line just after // ...


5

It's the "magic regex" again, that's expected to move the earth in a single pattern It's hard to tell from your question what result you want, but it looks like you want any file that has a dot in its name that doesn't start with readme or makefile So just write that. After all, that's how .gitignore works: it's just a list of files or file patterns to ...


5

You want pkill: pkill myscriptname On some systems there is a similar tool called killall, but be careful because on Solaris it really does kill everything! Note that there is also pgrep which you can use to replace your ps | grep pipeline: pgrep myscriptname It prints the PID for you, and nothing else.


5

This awk one-liner should help you: awk -F'+' -v OFS="" 'NF>2{for(i=2;i<=NF;i+=2)gsub(/\S/,"_",$i)}7' Test kent$ awk -F'+' -v OFS="" 'NF>2{for(i=2;i<=NF;i+=2)gsub(/\S/,"_",$i)}7' <<<"Foo was the +first+ to get a drink at +the bar+." Foo was the _____ to get a drink at ___ ___.


4

This is a task for sort: sort -uk4 file.log This will get the first line when multiple lines are identical starting from 4th field, if you want the last entry use tac to reverse the lines and do the operation: tac file.log | sort -uk4 Example: $ cat file.txt 2016-05-02 11:37:32,211 (glastopf.glastopf) 190.244.96.69 requested GET ...


4

You can use -exec option in find: find . -name '*.axvw' -exec grep -n 'some string' {} + Or else use xargs: find . -name '*.axvw' -print0 | xargs -0 grep -n 'some string'


4

Do awk -v a=5 '{print $1,$2+a}' input.dat


3

grep doesn't print 0, which is what your script checks for. Its exit code is 0. To check the exit code it's simply: if who | grep -wq "$1"; then echo "$1 is logged in" fi


3

Using R, and including the Match column from your data. You want rows where the value of A occurs anywhere in the column B? > x[x$A %in% x$B,] A B Match 3 3 13 YES 8 14 NA YES It looks like you might want to match everything before the _: > with(x, x[sub('_.*', '', A) %in% B,]) A B Match 2 2_1 3 YES 3 3 13 YES 4 3_1 14 ...


3

In Linux there exists a command for that, it is called pgrep. On Ubuntu it is in the package procps together with pkill.


3

You can use xargs for this: xargs -I {} grep -H 'pattern' {} < ~/filenames.txt grep will run against filename on each line from ~/filenames file. This will also work with spaces in filenames.


3

Assume your awk has been taken hostage. A GNU sed/grep solution! To generate a sed script that does what you want, we get the lines to change from the input file: $ grep -wFf pattern.txt file.txt 1 text 3 text 6 text 17 text This matches complete words (-w) so 1 text is matched, but 11 text is not; -F is for fixed strings (no regex, should be faster) and ...


3

What you are doing wrong is trying to store a command in a variable. For simplicity, robustness, etc. commands are stored in aliases (if no arguments) or functions (if arguments), not variables. In this case: $ alias foo='grep X' $ echo "aXb" | foo aXb I recommend you read the book Shell Scripting Recipes by Chris Johnson ASAP to get the basics of shell ...


3

The robust way to store a simple command in a variable in Bash is to use an array: # Store the command names and arguments individually # in the elements of an *array*. cmd=( grep -P '^[^\s]*\s3\s' ) # Use the entire array as the command to execute - be sure to # double-quote ${cmd[@]}. echo 'before 3 after' | "${cmd[@]}" If, by contrast, your command is ...


3

Use a while loop: while read -r i j k; do [ "$j" -gt 3 ] && echo "$i $j $k"; done <file.txt


3

You can do: grep -Ev '\.(png|jpg|css|js)' file.log


3

POSIX defines the behaviour of (POSIX) regular expressions and defines Basic Regular Expressions (BREs) and Extended Regular Expressions (EREs). Using grep -E requires EREs; without the -E, you get BREs (with -F you get no regular expressions). The POSIX definition of * in a BRE says: * The <asterisk> shall be special except when used: ...


3

Both $ and . are non-word constituent characters, so -w matches Linux in both lines, nothing else. man grep states that: -w, --word-regexp Select only those lines containing matches that form whole words. The test is that the matching substring must either be at the beginning of the line, or preceded by a non-word constituent character. ...


3

Would it not be easier to simply exclude those where the time was low? grep 'stopped: ' | grep -v 'stopped: 0'


3

This should work: taskid="}27" awk -F'|' -v tid="$taskid" '$9 == tid' file Output: 3347:tyu|ray|24|0|0|ty6|{89|uh|}27|0 3349:tyo|rtert|28|0|0|ty6|{89|gh|}27|0


3

Use \K (pattern from Perl-regex) to discard the previously matched chars. grep -oP 'Message Sent \[\K.{10}(?= -+)' log/development.log or grep -oP 'Message\s+Sent\s+\[\K.{10}(?=\s+-+)' log/development.log DEMO


3

Grep is not great for this, awk is better. But assuming your columns are separated by spaces, then you want grep -E '^[^ ]+ +3( |$)' Explanation: find something that has a start of line, followed by one or more non-space characters (first column), then one or more space characters (column separator), then the number 3, then either a space (because there's ...


3

You could go for something like this: awk '/CQD/ { for (i = 1; i <= NF; ++i) if ($i == "CQD") col = i } col && $col == 5' file On the line matching the field name of interest, loop through each field to find the column that contains it. When col has been set and the value in the column matches the one you want, print the line (the default ...


3

You don't talk about identifying the files to be processed, but let's assume that you want to remove all IAM A DEFAULT lines from all *.txt files in the current directory This Perl one-line command will doe that for you. It will also save each original file like abc.txt as abc.txt.bak perl -i.bak -lne 'print unless $_ eq "IAM A DEFAULT"' *.txt I hope ...


3

You can use awk command: awk 'FNR==NR{a[$1]; next} $2 in a' file2.txt file1.txt In the first iteration we store all values from file2.txt into an array a. In the 2nd step white iterating file1.txt we check if column 2 is in array a and print it. Output: 1 A bla 9232 1 B tesfs 3049 2 E eor 4042



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible