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2

Use the -o flag: grep -o 'XXX:.*' <input >output


0

You could just use grep as below: grep -ow 'XXX:some value' myfile.txt > patternMatched.txt


3

To get last n characters of each line using awk: cat file asdf asdfg asdfgh awk -vn=2 '{print substr($0,length($0)-n+1)}' df fg gh Or do you like to get data after XXX, then do: echo "here is my line XXX:22" | awk -F"XXX:" '{print $2}' 22


1

Read in the lines and prefix each line not having a colon with a space. The result will be in DCF format so we can just use read.dcf to read it in, replacing any newlines with comma and space. The resulting structure will have components From, To, Subject and B-CC. Lines <- readLines("myfile.txt") hasColon <- grepl(":", Lines) Lines[!hasColon] ...


0

In additional @markets's answer you can use \k notify in place if look-behind assertion like: grep -P 'name=\K[a-zA-Z0-9_ ]*' The \K ignores anything before matched pattern (name=) and also ignores pattern itself from result. Use -o option to print only matched part.


2

Same as @akrun's but with little modifications. > library(stringr) > lines <- readLines(n=8) From: abc@xyz.com To: qwe@xyz.com, ewq@xyz.com tuu@xyz.com, vbn@xyz.com lkj@xyz.com, jkl@xyz.com Subject: Introduction to R B-CC: qwe@xyz.com, ewq@xyz.com tuu@xyz.com, vbn@xyz.com lkj@xyz.com, jkl@xyz.com > str1 <- paste(str_trim(lines), collapse=', ...


2

You could do: library(stringr) str1 <- paste(str_trim(lines), collapse=', ') str_extract_all(str1, perl('(?=To: ).*(?=, Subject)'))[[1]] #[1] "To: qwe@xyz.com, ewq@xyz.com, tuu@xyz.com, vbn@xyz.com, #lkj@xyz.com, jkl@xyz.com" str_extract_all(str1, perl('(?=B-CC:).*'))[[1]] #[1] "B-CC: qwe@xyz.com, ewq@xyz.com, tuu@xyz.com, vbn@xyz.com, #lkj@xyz.com, ...


0

cat input | sed 's/: /\n/' | awk '/To/{flag=1;next}/Subject/{flag=0}flag' > to.txt cat input | sed 's/: /\n/' | awk '/B-CC/{flag=1;next}/FINISH/{flag=0}flag' > bcc.txt If I have understood your question properly this will work for you.


2

Since this is just a simple subsitution on a single line it's really most appropriate for sed: $ sed -n -r 's/(^Revenue)(,[^,]*){3}(.*),[^,]*,"\t\t".*/\1\3/p' file Revenue,444.000,333.000,222.000,111.00 but you can do the same in awk with gensub() (gawk) or match()/substr() or similar. It will run in the blink of an eye no matter what tool you use.


1

The following is getting close to what I originally wanted: git diff HEAD^ --name-only -G "TODO" | xargs git grep "TODO" -- This prints all TODOs in the files touched in the last commit - and not just the TODOs that were added. But this is also quite useful. In this way I can also check if there may be other TODOs that can now be removed.


1

The shell expands ** -- that is if you've first set shopt -s globstar and are using Bash 4.0 or higher. In that case, you can look to see exactly what files the shell is matching to your globstar. Try these: $ ls -d ~/projects/**/trunk/ or: $ echo ~/projects/**/trunk/ Then, go get a cup of coffee because globstar can take quite a long time to execute. ...


2

This should work: \find -X . -type d -name trunk | xargs -L 1 ack PATTERN The -X argument, from the find manual -X Permit find to be safely used in conjunction with xargs(1). If a file name contains any of the delimiting characters used by xargs(1), a diagnostic message is displayed on standard error, and the file is skipped. The ...


0

Another way with awk using the file twice awk 'a[FNR];a[NR-1]=!((/explorer\.exe/&&c=5)||c&&c--){}' test{,} Example input line 1 line 2 line 3 Rule: r1 Owner: Process explorer.exe Pid 1544 0x01ec350f 8b 45 a8 0f b6 00 8d 4d a8 ff 14 85 c8 7f ed 01 .E.....M........ 0x01ec351f 84 c0 75 ec 8b 4d fc e8 ba f5 fe ff f7 85 b0 fd ...


4

awk this awk one-liner would help: awk 'NR==FNR{if(/explorer[.]exe/)d[++i]=NR;next} {for(x=1;x<=i;x++)if(FNR>=d[x]-1&&FNR<=d[x]+4)next}7' file file see this example: kent$ cat f foo foo2 Rule: r1 Owner: Process explorer.exe Pid 1544 remove1 remove2 remove3 remove4 bar bar2 kent$ awk ...


0

Here is an awk solution: awk '{a[$0]++} END {for (i in a) if (a[i]==1) print i}' file this is line 2


2

Check out man uniq: -u Only output lines that are not repeated in the input. With that in mind, sort does a pairwise comparison to see if it's neighbor matches, meaning that you need to sort your output before feeding it to uniq: $ sort my_list.txt | uniq -u


4

sort x.txt |uniq -u assuming your file is in x.txt which gives this is line 2


2

if eval 'nohup grep "'$arg1' '$arg2' [A-Za-z]\+" /tmp/dict.txt > /dev/null'; then echo 'found match' else If you look closely, you are sending the standard output of grep to /dev/null (i.e. the bit-bucket/no man's land). To see the result of the grep command, change > /dev/null to 2> /dev/null (which will only send stderr to /dev/null) or ...


2

Rather than using tools designed to deal with text files, use an HTML parser, such as Mojo::DOM for Perl: use strict; use warnings; use feature ":5.10"; use Mojo::DOM; use List::Util "first"; # construct DOM object from file my $d = Mojo::DOM->new(do { local $/; <> }); # get all <a> tags my $a = $d->find("a"); ...


0

grep as follows grep --color -F -A 4 -B 4 '/laptops/samsung~brand/pr?sid=6bo,b5g' 'my_file' EDIT since all the data are found on one line you can use grep to find the string and characters surrounding the string grep -o --color '.\{0,3\}/laptops/samsung~brand/pr?sid=6bo,b5g.\{0,3\} This will find the pattern and print 3 chars before and after the ...


0

This is what you need: awk -F, '{print $0 ($2=="" ? "Incomplete" : "")}' file All other currently posted awk solutions will fail given some specific values of $1 and/or $2 (e.g. if $2 has the numeric value zero or $1 contains a space or ...).


1

Seems like there must contain only alphabets before :, if yes then you could try the below. $ grep '^[a-zA-Z]\+:' file all: test test: $(OBJS) clean:


2

This doesn't match your spec exactly, but I think it could be useful posting it too (and can be adapted with minor changes): sed -n 's/^\([^.%#[:space:]]*\):.*$/\1/p' makefile -n Disables default sed behaviour of printing all lines to stdout ^[^.%#[:space:]] Matches lines that don't start with ., %, # or any whitespace character. All characters until the ...


2

Try this grep '^[^!.#\;]*:' MakeFile


1

Here is an awk awk 'NF==1{$0=$0"incomplete"}1' file server01, incomplete server02, incomplete server03, incomplete server04, windows 2008 R2 USA server05, Linux Centos Canada server06, incomplete server07, incomplete server08, Linux RedHat UK server09, incomplete server10, incomplete If its only one field, add extra text. Here is an other variation: ...


3

You can try this sed command sed 's/, $/&Incomplete/' FileName there is no space after server01, try * zero or more occurrence sed 's/, *$/&Incomplete/' Output : server01, Incomplete server02, Incomplete server03, Incomplete server04, windows 2008 R2 USA server05, Linux Centos Canada server06, Incomplete server07, Incomplete server08, Linux ...


1

With bash: while IFS=, read -r A B; do echo -n "$A,"; [[ $B == " " ]] && echo " Incomplete" || echo "$B"; done Output: server01, Incomplete server02, Incomplete server03, Incomplete server04, windows 2008 R2 USA server05, Linux Centos Canada server06, Incomplete server07, Incomplete server08, Linux RedHat UK server09, Incomplete server10, ...


0

Try something like: awk '{if (!$2) {print $1, "Incomplete"} else {print $1, $2}}' myfile.txt Output: server01, Incomplete server02, Incomplete server03, Incomplete server04, windows 2008 R2 USA server05, Linux Centos Canada server06, Incomplete server07, Incomplete server08, Linux RedHat UK server09, Incomplete server10, Incomplete


1

To grab the commands which starts with CREATE BITMAP through grep, $ grep -oPz 'CREATE BITMAP[\S\s]*?;$' file CREATE BITMAP INDEX MY_SCHEMA.MY_TABLE_BITMAP_INDEX_1 ON MY_SCHEMA.MY_TABLE (MY_COLUMN2) TABLESPACE MY_TABLESPACE; From man grep -Z, --null print 0 byte after FILE name -o, --only-matching show only the part of a line ...


2

If this isn't what you expect, you should edit your question to better define what it is you do expect: $ cat my.file foo Here it is: RouteTableId bar $ $ cat config.file myTerm="RouteTableId" myFile="my.file" $ $ cat script.sh . config.file myFunction() { mySubFunction() { myVar=$(grep -m 1 "$1" "$2") echo "$myVar" } ...


3

You are not passing the values of the variables but the variable names themselves as values. i.e. myFunction "myTerm" "myFile" should be myFunction "$myTerm" "$myFile"


0

You better use df -P to force df to output each record on one line. Once you do that awk is easy: df -P | awk 'int($(NF-1)) >= 60 {print $1, $(NF-1)}'


0

The list already is a parameter seperation, so extra quoting with ' is not necessary: grepCommand = ['grep', '-e', r"^commit [a-z0-9]\{{{0}\}}".format("40")]


2

Here's an approach. Non-matching strings will result in NA: match <- gregexpr("((?i)(?<=>\\s)[^<]+(?=<[^;]+;[^>]+>\\s$))", vec, perl = TRUE) unlist(ifelse(match == -1, NA, regmatches(vec, match))) An example: vec <- c("s=\"N01106\" tb=\"429.081\"> ja<TSW();ja> .<LET();.> <au id=\"213\" s=\"N01106\" ...


0

Try using: awk '/%/ && int($4)>=60 {print $4, $5}' filename


0

awk '$4+0>=60{print l, $4}{l=$0}' input


0

You can do this with awk awk '/.js/ && !/.min.js/' To print filename: awk '/.js/ && !/.min.js/ {print FILENAME}' *


0

The following command will work in folder as well. For current dir you can use this find . | xargs grep ".js" | grep -v "min.js" For any specific folder find (folder path) | xargs grep ".js" | grep -v "min.js"


2

Just pipe the output to another grep as grep -H ".js" | grep -vH ".min.js"


1

Lengthy, but something like $ tac input | sed -n '/Tiger/, $ p' | tac Tiger Lion Cat Tiger From man page tac - concatenate and print files in reverse


0

Ok guys I did a nested for loop (probably very in efficient) but I got it working printing the matching mac addresses using this #!/usr/bin/bash for scanlist in `cat scan | cut -d: -f1,2,3` do for listt in `cat list` do if [[ $scanlist == $listt ]]; then grep $scanlist scan fi done done if anyone can make this more elegant but it works for me for ...


0

That -exec command isn't safe for strings with spaces. You want something like this instead (assuming finding any of the strings is reason not to add any of the strings). find /directory/ -name "file.php" -type f -exec sh -c "grep -q 'string1|string2|string3' \"\$1\" || echo -e 'string1\nstring2\nstring3\n' >> \"\$1\"" - {} \; To explain the safety ...


2

You need to escape the backslashes one more time in r. d$SomeColumn[grep("(?ix)<VNW[^;]*;(dis|dat)> \\w*<N\\(", d$Right, perl=TRUE)] <- 1 | |


0

Just tweak this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/25085230/1745001 to print every node in the descent instead of just the root and leaf nodes. For example, this will handle potential infinite recursion such as would occur if your input file contained both k1 k2 and k2 k1 and will print the output in the order the keys appear in the input file: $ cat ...


0

A shorter regex for this task is: (?i)\\w*zz\\w*\\s\\w*zz Find the indices of the matching strings grep("(?i)\\w*zz\\w*\\s\\w*zz", text2) # [1] 2 4 The complete string including the matches grep("(?i)\\w*zz\\w*\\s\\w*zz", text2, value = TRUE) # [1] " szszzz dsdfaarzdzzz" "Zzip zzck"


0

For your updated requirements In Awk awk '{for(i=(b[$2]>0);i<=b[$2];i++){c[$1" "++b[$1]]=$2" "c[$2" "i];print $1,c[$1" "b[$1]]}}' file Example input k1 v1 k1 x1 k1 y1 k2 k1 k2 k4 k3 k2 output k1 v1 k1 x1 k1 y1 k2 k1 v1 k2 k1 x1 k2 k1 y1 k2 k4 k3 k2 k1 v1 k3 k2 k1 x1 k3 k2 k1 y1 k3 k2 k4


1

sed -n '/\[.*JetAirways360/ s///p' YourFile should do your job based on your sample


0

Pipe the output to xargs command like below. ps aux | grep -v grep |grep <process name> | awk '{print $2}' | xargs kill OR ps aux | grep -v grep | awk '/process name/{print $2}' | xargs kill This would kill all the 4 processes.


0

dict={} x1=fileobject.read() for line in x1.splitlines(): if line.split()[1] in dict.keys(): dict[line.split()[0]]=line.split()[1]+" "+dict[line.split()[1]] else: dict[line.split()[0]]=line.split()[1] print dict This way you can have a dictionary of object with keys as you want. Output:{'k3': 'v3', 'k2': 'v2', 'k1': 'v1', 'k5': ...



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