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35

Use Apache Benchmark (ab). It's a command line tool that ships with apache web server. If you're running *nix, chances are it's already installed on your machine. For example, if you want to send 1000 requests to a web server running on localhost using 10 concurrent threads you would do this: $ ab -n 1000 -c 10 http://localhost/ It'll spit out a nice ...


10

Try Grinder, it's reasonably simple to use, and can be scripted.


9

Maybe you could try Gatling . It provides a GUI, recorders, reports (response time distribution, requests per second over time,..),... I think that the biggest difference between gatling and jmeter is that gatling does not use 1 thread for 1 user, but uses async IO. It could be interesting if you have performance issues whith jmeter (and if you cannot use ...


6

Store the functions in a list (without calling them), then use random.shuffle: import random class TestRunner: def __call__(self): users = [user1, user2, user3, user4] random.shuffle(users) for user in users: user()


5

Setup a Linux box as the default router for this machine. Install 'netem' on the linux box: http://www.linuxfoundation.org/collaborate/workgroups/networking/netem


5

How easy is it to integration Jmeter or Grinder with Ant and Junit jMeter can run any jUnit3 test and there is patch to allow it to run with jUnit4. I have run selenium tests from jMeter, the big problem is that you cant run too many tests at once. On my machine I had run 8 tests at once and its not really enough to test performance. also test take ...


5

In older versions of Jython, generators (functions using the yield keyword) are not available by default. You can try enabling the feature by adding from __future__ import generators to the top of your source file. If this doesn't work, you're probably out of luck and generators simply are not available in that version of Jython. In that case, you can try ...


4

Are you using Jython 2.4? try/except/finally was introduced in Python 2.5.


4

Try FunkLoad, a functional and performance testing tool for web apps, written in Python.


4

I don't know jython, but if you want a random choice, this should work import random class TestRunner: def __call__(self): func = random.choice([user1, user2, user3, user3]) func()


3

Well, stupid as it may sound, don't set the Console Host property in the console itself. To set this property open the console -> File -> Options -> Communication tab. Leave the Console Host empty otherwise the agent won't connect to the console (have no idea why, I thought setting it to be my IP was a good idea).


3

In Python, use random.choice: import random elementinthelist = random.choice(lists.list1)


2

You need to include grinder lib dir to CLASSPATH on to your shell. Make sure your environment variable has path added. As a thumb rule make sure GRINDERPATH, GRINDERPROPERTIES, CLASSPATH & JAVA_HOME are set before you start Grinder I would suggest you to create environment variable file (or even add to startup profile script) with the above mentioned ...


2

Ensure you do not have a local antivirus which intercepts TCP connections Ensure your local firewall is not configured too strict Ensure you've set localhost:8001 as the http proxy in your browser, not socks Ensure your browser attempts to go to a real site, not the local proxy Which browser on which OS? Any antivirus? Firewall? Are you connecting to a ...


2

You can ramp in your threads over time, so that as your test progresses, the load increases. See http://grinder.sourceforge.net/g3/script-gallery.html#threadrampup.py It will be up to you to determine at what point the load level is unacceptable. Grinder Analyzer might be helpful for that. http://track.sourceforge.net/ Good luck.


2

I'm just learning Python (less than a week), but I think it may be an issue with the \t. Python is reading this: \tlog('Arvind Purohit') But, instead of a tab, it's expecting 4 spaces, like this: log('Arvind Purohit') That's why it must be working when you copy/paste it. Make sure you're using an editor that shows all characters to avoid this and ...


2

I was having the same problem. The issue seemed to be that JIRA was configured with gzip compression on. Once I turned off gzip compression on the "General Configuration" page, the tests started running.


1

This is a basic way to do this. I have just gone through a run of searching all over google in order to do this. It works. the header need to be set up using NVPair, and you need to tell whatever it is receiving it that it is to expect a json object in the payload that last hanging comma is required. You can add more headers, comma separated NVPair objects, ...


1

No conversion should be required. Change print str(response_string) to print response_string


1

rename your _call_ method to __call__


1

here is sample code for my web service: # coding=utf-8 import traceback from net.grinder.script.Grinder import grinder from net.grinder.script import Test from net.grinder.plugin.http import HTTPPluginControl, HTTPRequest from HTTPClient import NVPair connectionDefaults = HTTPPluginControl.getConnectionDefaults() httpUtilities = ...


1

you imported items from grinder, not grinder itself, try import grinder.logger.info import grinder.statistics.forLastTest it might also be net.grinder.logger.info and net.grinder.statistics.forLastTest if this is the case then your code will need changing to go with the change from grinder to net.grinder


1

Might be more reliable to get info about the host you are running on programmatically. That way you don't need to worry about accidentally setting identical (or otherwise incorrect) values for grinder.hostid on your various agents. You could use something like this: import socket # ... host_id = socket.gethostname() # or alternately host_id = ...


1

Also, if someone else searches this, this can be caused if you are testing with a server on your localhost. When you have a proxy and localhost destination make sure that the proxy settings do not bypass the localhost target (preferences\network\settings in FireFox).


1

Grinder, Funkload, SoapUI (only for Soap Services), Neoload (for load test), Charles Proxy


1

Request Logging Grinder will normally log all of your HTTP requests. So at least for the request logging, the default behaviour may be good enough for you. Look for a log file with a name like <hostname>-0.log In this file, you'll see your requests, plus the server response codes. If you want to explicitly log your http request from your code, ...


1

Other options: WanEM (OpenSource, clock timing can be a challenge in the default VM install which produces inconsistent results. Best used wen installed on physical hardware instead of within a virtual machine) WanEm Download location Shunra (Commercial, My preference in a chassis solution) Shunra Products Anue (Commercial, now Ixia) Anue on Ixia ...


1

You'll need to turn your dictionary into a series of keys and values: def chainDict(mapping): items = [] for item in mapping.iteritems(): items.extend(item) return items event = portTest.event(chainDict(myDict)) This'll pass a list of [keyFoo, valueFoo keyBar, valueBar] to the event method, where keys and values are paired but in ...


1

I haven't used Grinder, so I shant speak to it. I found LoadUI's interface to be bulky and confusing. I ultimately abandoned it for Jmeter. SoapUI was great for getting the SOAP requests and pretty good at customizing scripts once you figure out the tool. It has a medium learning curve. SoapUI has built-in load testing which is pretty decent. Jmeter has ...



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